Practical Backpacking™ Forums

Welcome to Practical Backpacking™ Forums (PBF).

You are currently viewing PBF as a guest which has limited access. By becoming a PBF member, you will have full access to view and participate in tens of thousands of informative discussions, to view links and attachments (photos), and will gain access to other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free! Click to Become a PBF Member! Be sure to also explore the Practical Backpacking Podcast.


Go Back   Practical Backpacking™ Forums > Practical Backpacking™ Gear Discussion > General Gear Discussion
HOME FAQ PBF GUIDELINES BLOG PODCAST GALLERY STORE CALENDAR Mark Forums Read

General Gear Discussion The General Gear Discussion forum is for the discussion of traditional and lightweight (ultralight) backpacking gear that is not covered in other Practical Backpacking™ forums. [Please post about Backpacks, Shelters, Sleeping Gear, Backcountry Kitchen (Food, Stoves) in those respective forum areas.]


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-14-2012, 01:46 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Reality Reality is offline
PBF Administrator & PB Podcast Host
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,954
Winter Buff (Polar Fleece, Merino Wool)

[AdminNote: There is another thread that covers general buff and bandana usage. This thread is specifically for cold, winter weather.]

In a thread regarding scarf use, I mentioned how convenient it could be to wrap a scarf around the face to periodically warm the face - rather than wearing something like a balaclava.

Another versatile winter option is a buff that can be warn as a neck gaiter and then pulled up over the lower face (and even over the top of the head), as needed for periodic warmth. There are a few winter buff options including the Polar Buff, Polar Reversible Buff, and the Wool Buff.


Ways to Wear a Buff (Winter wear options discussed in this thread circled in red)

Reality
Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Sponsors
  #2  
Old 12-14-2012, 09:38 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
beekeeper beekeeper is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
Backpack: Golite Galaxy
Sleeping Gear: Hammock peapod
Shelter: Tarp
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Fairview, TX
Posts: 106
I like their versatility. I own one but it doesn't get cold enough here in Texas generally for me to use it much. I can see their use up in the colder climates, though, especially the polar fleece or wool ones.
I think having a lightweight dark or camo one would be very useful when hunting. I notice they are for sale in the outdoor store around here. On the product website there are an amazing number of print, and styles.

Last edited by beekeeper : 12-14-2012 at 09:49 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-14-2012, 10:51 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
dustin dustin is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
Backpack: Golite Jam
Sleeping Gear: Golite quilt
Shelter: SMD Gatewood Cape
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Lakewood, CO
Posts: 36
I don't own a scarf at all because I have two Buffs.

I use the original, thin Buff for running because it's very breathable, but stops just enough of the wind and cold. It's a great item to take on dayhikes or to use as sleep gear because you can make it serve any purpose you need at the time. It also disappears into a pocket or backpack (sometimes literally, so maybe opt for a bright color or pattern) so I don't think twice about bringing it. In fact, it's on my permanent packing list.

The other Buff I have is a Cyclone Buff, which is basically the Polar Buff, but with Windstopper fleece. I don't use that one as much because it is WARM. Too warm but for the coldest days here in CO. It is also a bit bulky to wear and carry because of the fleece. Also not as stretchy as the thin version, so it's harder to make it into a balaclava. If I could do it over, I would go for the more breathable Polar version.

Overall, I love mine and recommend grabbing one because of their versatility and surprising utility.
Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Sponsors
  #4  
Old 12-14-2012, 11:58 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Reality Reality is offline
PBF Administrator & PB Podcast Host
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,954
Quote:
Originally Posted by beekeeper
I like their versatility.
Me too. They have a lot of on-body uses and offer plenty of other multi-use options around camp.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dustin
The other Buff I have is a Cyclone Buff, which is basically the Polar Buff, but with Windstopper fleece. I don't use that one as much because it is WARM. Too warm but for the coldest days here in CO. It is also a bit bulky to wear and carry because of the fleece. Also not as stretchy as the thin version, so it's harder to make it into a balaclava. If I could do it over, I would go for the more breathable Polar version.
The Cyclone Buff seems like it would come in handy for those who are going to be stationary in very cold weather. But I'm with you on the "too warm" and "bulky" attributes - considering my intended use.

Reality
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-16-2012, 01:24 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: New South Wales
Posts: 275


I have an genuine 'buff' kicking around somewhere here that is in their original standard microfibre material...

And two of different brands that are in a heavier "winter weight" material ~ one is branded as a "SAS Balaclava" and sold in Army disposal shops ~ the one I have is made of a thick brushed polypopylene fleece and is maybe 15 years old (it actually preceded the "buffs" into shops down here..). And I bought a black microfibre polarfleece version only about 5 years ago, (whose brand I don't recall), that actually weighs less than the others.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-24-2012, 09:33 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
captaincoupal captaincoupal is offline
Practical Backpacking™ New Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 8
I have the original buff, and use it for running as well. It's perfect, because once I'm warmed up it's small enough to toss into my small jacket pocket without breaking a stride.

I got my wife the wool one, and it's her go-to now for skating in the winter.
Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Sponsors
Aquaponics 4 You
  #7  
Old 01-08-2013, 09:32 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
ultralightbackpacker ultralightbackpacker is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 21
I prefer merino wool neck gator. Less unused material and if really cold can easily pull it up over nose.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-14-2013, 02:48 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GGervin GGervin is online now
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
Sooner or later, I will make one. Provided I get the material right, I think I can make it function as a darkcloth for my view camera as well as a wearable item. Just not sure what material I need yet, or exactly what design. Probably a dense fleece.

By the way, sometimes modern digital SLR's suffer from screen visibility which could be remedied by the tried and true darkcloth. So this intention of mine may have application to modern digital photographers as well. Maybe not. Just food for thought...
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-14-2013, 03:10 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Reality Reality is offline
PBF Administrator & PB Podcast Host
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,954
One of the remarkable features of a Buff is that it is completely seamless.

This has proven to be more comfortable than a couple of my balaclavas that feature annoying, slightly painful, seams. One in particular has a seam that is positioned directly under where my nose rests - producing a constant pressure ridge.

I've recently used my Polar Reversible Buff a few times and found it to be both comfortable and warm.

Reality
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-29-2013, 11:27 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
ultralightbackpacker ultralightbackpacker is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 21
I would like to revoke my earlier comment, these didn't appeal to me at first glance, but one of my friends had one with him the other day and I really liked it. Looks like a good product. I may invest in one in the future.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Good Socks (Merino Wool Blend) mugs General Gear Discussion 24 08-13-2011 12:38 PM
Possum Down Beanie (PossumDown / Merino Wool Blend) Reality General Gear Discussion 19 03-18-2010 07:36 PM
Durability of Merino Wool Clothing amac General Gear Discussion 7 08-23-2009 08:30 PM
LW Merino Wool T-Shirt Recommendations Reality General Gear Discussion 19 06-09-2008 03:59 PM
Fleece vs Wool Perkolady General Gear Discussion 6 12-16-2006 08:44 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:48 PM.

Backpacking Forums


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2017 Practical Backpacking™
Practical Backpacking is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacker is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Podcast is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Magazine is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™