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Backcountry Kitchen The Backcountry Kitchen forum is for the discussion of food and cooking gear related topics for backpacking trips (e.g. menus, recipes, stoves, fuel...).


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  #1  
Old 12-27-2008, 11:56 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Non-Metal Mug / Cup for Hot Beverages

If you use a non-metal, non-disposable mug (cup) for hot beverages, please share the specs (brand, size, weight) and any related commentary regarding how it has performed for you on your backpacking trips.

Reality
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  #2  
Old 12-27-2008, 01:16 PM
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amac amac is offline
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I have a blue lexan cup. Sorry, I don't have a weight for it (can't justify the $$$ for a scale, yet). It's pretty lightweight, rugged as can be, and doesn't keep hot things hot worth a damn. But, Rivet alcohol stove fits in it perfectly, and then the cup fits in my Open Country small aluminum pot nice and snug. I'm sure I can upgrade to something that actually keeps warm things warm, but I'm at the point where I actually have most everything I need, and find it hard to justify spending money to replace what is perfectly functional.


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  #3  
Old 12-27-2008, 02:41 PM
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big_load big_load is offline
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I mainly use an 8 oz. red plastic cup (20g) from an old cook set. I once used it for everything, but eventually decided that I liked to have coffee and oatmeal at the same time. Since then I've also carried an Orikaso folding cup, 52g. That seems kind of heavy, but I'm happy with it.
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Old 12-27-2008, 04:31 PM
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Perkolady Perkolady is offline
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I've been using a GSI Cascadian cup. It's polypropylene, inexpensive, and holds 12 oz., which is a good volume for me. It weighs under 2 oz.

Perkolady
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Old 12-27-2008, 05:10 PM
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Slosteppin Slosteppin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perkolady
I've been using a GSI Cascadian cup. It's polypropylene, inexpensive, and holds 12 oz., which is a good volume for me. It weighs under 2 oz.

Perkolady

I have the GSI Soloist Cookset, which includes a cup. This set can be found on the above site. The cover for the kettle also fits the cup. The set is heavier than other combinations I use but the cup keeps my coffee hotter much longer than the TI cup I often use.

Slosteppin
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Old 12-27-2008, 06:08 PM
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Kylemeister Kylemeister is offline
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I use the GSI 14oz Lexan cup. 100 grams on my scales, but the morning coffee in large doses is a requirement. I was eyeballing other mugs, but for the volume and weight I think I'm set.
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Old 12-28-2008, 06:35 AM
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Gary_N9ZYE Gary_N9ZYE is offline
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I have been using a plastic 8 oz cup from a cookset for many years. I make my oatmeal first and then coffee in the same cup. The coffee cleans the oatmeal and just leaves a simple wipe out before storage.
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Old 12-28-2008, 06:13 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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REI plastic cup with slobber prevention top: 12 ounce cup, 5 ounce weight. Yeah, too heavy by half, but it just ain't campin' without it. Used to pack a similar cup I got from a gas station twenty years or more ago, but finally tossed it during a garage reorg, I think. Well, anyway it came up missing and I just couldn't find a gas station willing to give me another and that's how it all happened.

Sure keeps the coffee hot!

Ben
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Old 01-04-2009, 07:24 PM
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crkmeup crkmeup is offline
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I am sure someone will post info about all the new chemicals I am injesting using my method but here goes...

I use sports drink bottles as my water bottles and I use one of them for my tea and coffee. As I pour the hot/boiling water into it is does seem to change shape a little but the bottle holds up for a few trips before I replace it with another "free" bottle.

I also pack my dogs food in these bottles because I have had the kibble wear holes in plastic bags.
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  #10  
Old 01-04-2009, 08:36 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crkmeup
I use sports drink bottles as my water bottles and I use one of them for my tea and coffee. As I pour the hot/boiling water into it is does seem to change shape a little but the bottle holds up for a few trips before I replace it with another "free" bottle.
Do you use a non-disposable mug/cup at all?

Reality
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