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Bikepacking The Bikebacking forum is for discussion that relates directly to bikepacking (also known as bicycle camping). Subject matter should involve the backpacking/camping/bike gear and trip planning as it relates to mountain biking and bicycle touring.


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  #1  
Old 08-01-2009, 10:08 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Bike Locks

If you use a bike lock on your bikepacking trips, please share which type you use.

Reality
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  #2  
Old 08-01-2009, 10:58 AM
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Cyclesafe Cyclesafe is offline
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I've been using a 19oz combination coiled-cable combo, but I'm thinking about switching to a small (but high quality) combination lock and 5ft thin (4mm) plastic sheathed straight steel combo to save maybe 8oz.

Bike theft happens, but it is rarer in the hinterlands. Mostly thefts of opportunity, but debilitating to the true owner nonetheless. From lifetime habit, I just can't leave my bike out of my sight without locking it. No lock will deter a properly equipped professional, but something just robust enough to require a somewhat specialized tool would deter the teenager looking to "borrow" your bike.
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Old 08-01-2009, 11:34 AM
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Hanger Hanger is offline
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I've been using the same bike locks for the last 4 years. One is a simple then cable lock. I wouldn't trust this since my friend had his cut one time, but it is nice for when I have to lock my bike to something that is larger than normal like a tree. My main lock is a more robust u-lock. I'm with Cyclesafe in that I always lock my bike no matter what. If I'm going to leave my bike somewhere that I deem unsafe, I'll also take the front wheel with me.
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Old 08-01-2009, 11:36 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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don't do a great deal of bikepacking, yet, but i like taking along my city lock(it's already on the bike, why leave it behind?). it's a trek shackle(u-lock) lock, and almost eight feet of cable besides. sure, heavy, but still no real worry, weight wise. if i stop in town, it'll stop anyone who doesn't have a can of liquid nitrogen or a ten foot breaker bar.

it's overkill for most bikepacking, though. i think the majority of tour-riders would be best served with a light steel cable and a good quality keyed lock.

Last edited by dsuursoo : 08-01-2009 at 11:46 AM.
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Old 08-01-2009, 01:41 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclesafe
I've been using a 19oz combination coiled-cable combo, but I'm thinking about switching to a small (but high quality) combination lock and 5ft thin (4mm) plastic sheathed straight steel combo to save maybe 8oz.
Do you have a manufacturer/model in mind? I have something similar to what you're referring to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclesafe
Bike theft happens, but it is rarer in the hinterlands. Mostly thefts of opportunity, but debilitating to the true owner nonetheless. From lifetime habit, I just can't leave my bike out of my sight without locking it. No lock will deter a properly equipped professional, but something just robust enough to require a somewhat specialized tool would deter the teenager looking to "borrow" your bike.
I share similar thoughts on this. [It's not unlike auto and home security.] It's those crimes of opportunity and ease that we can make an effort to avert. A little security goes a long way against the cowardly criminal-opportunists.

Reality
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  #6  
Old 08-01-2009, 02:06 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
It's those crimes of opportunity and ease that we can make an effort to avert. A little security goes a long way against the cowardly criminal-opportunists.


yes. make it look unappealing, and turn them towards an easier target. sort of like judo, redirect their energy elsewhere.
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Old 08-07-2009, 05:25 PM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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I usually use a Kryptonite cable lock, but if I go somewhere I need to use a lock, I use my cheaper, older bike anyway. When I'm with my expensive bike (bike + upgrades = over $2000 replacement value), I make sure I never put myself in a situation where I need to lock it.

Since I'm a trailer fan, I'd need an especially long cable/chain to handle the trailer, too. I'd also prefer to don a u-lock in addition (the more layers of protection you have, the better, right?) and make an attempt to lock BOTH locks so that the bike/trailer still holds if one lock is compromised.

Protecting the gear on the bike/trailer is a little tougher, though. Anybody do anything to secure their overnight gear, food, clothing, repair gear?
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Old 09-25-2011, 11:02 AM
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Debkirk Debkirk is offline
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Well, I tell ya. I have operated police bicycles for a while now and believe it or not, I use a pair of handcuffs for my police bikes and my Rockhopper. A good set costs under $30.00. They last forever and can close around any tube on the bike frame. The keys can be had at any cop shop or gun store.
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