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Shelters The Shelters forum is for the discussion of backpacking shelters (tents, tarps, poncho-tarps, bivy sacks,...).


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  #1  
Old 04-02-2008, 09:37 AM
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Rickosovitch Rickosovitch is offline
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MSR Hubba Dry Run

At last! I woke up yesterday morning to a dry sleeping bag! The MSR Hubba is a great 3-season solo tent! The temp got down to 18ºF, but it was noticeably warmer inside although it is a breezy tent. The breeziness and nearly the all-mesh inner tent probably account for why I awoke so nice and dry. There's so much headroom that, even though sleeping on an exped 9 downmat which is nearly 3" thick, you can sit up without a thought of brushing up against the roof. The sleeping area is quite narrow (26") and at first I was concerned that my elbows were brushing the sides as I got into my longjohns, but because the mesh stays so completely dry it's no problem. The vestibule is very spacious. Plenty of room for pack and poles. I always keep my boots inside the sleeping area of any tent. I can hike out minus a lot of equipment, but not shoeless.

I'm going to replace the lines that attach to the stakes. I'll use very lightweight line and tie prussic knots so I can readily adjust tension and to trim a bit of weight. Also, I'm replacing the pin type stakes with North Face V stakes because I find V stakes work better in more types of soils.

But I now have the 3-season solo tent I've been looking for. It weighs 3lbs, 2.5oz. It has plenty of length and headroom. A vestibule big enough for everything including cooking in a pouring rain. And, best of all, I can rest assured that I'll wake up to a dry interior.

I found a super low buy on this tent. $159 including shipping. But it's worth every penny of the $249 full retail price. Nice going MSR!
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  #2  
Old 04-03-2008, 11:14 AM
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Trailguru Trailguru is offline
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It's hard to imagine a tent actually being worth $249.00 no matter what brand. I guess we are just accustomed to paying $200+ for backpacking shelters when they are being made for a fraction of what retailers sell them for.
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  #3  
Old 04-03-2008, 07:07 PM
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Franco Franco is offline
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Please don't be offended by my comment, but I can tell you that you would not be in business for very long if you hat to make (design,test, advertise and offer a g/tee) a tent like the Hubba and sell it retail for $159. That is a clearance price and not sustainable.
Franco
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Old 04-04-2008, 09:19 AM
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FamilyGuy FamilyGuy is offline
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The Hubba is nice, if not really narrow for wider folks.

Will you be using this in cooler months or even winter? If so, are you concerned that this is going to be one really cold tent as the fly will let breeze in (underneath)? Alternatively, are you concerned that when the outer fly does collect condensation that it can drip through the mesh? I ask because I believe you live in a very humid area. The Hubba HP looks like an interesting alternative for use in the shoulder months (still too narrow for me).
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  #5  
Old 04-05-2008, 06:44 AM
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upwardtrail upwardtrail is offline
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i think that the hp version is even better
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  #6  
Old 04-08-2008, 06:44 PM
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MtnHkr MtnHkr is offline
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Thanks for the review, I think it swayed me to my next solo tent.

MtnHkr
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  #7  
Old 04-08-2008, 08:49 PM
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Wayback Wayback is offline
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It looks like a well made tent, but it's about the size of a coffin. I think I would feel buried if I spent the night in a Hubba.
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  #8  
Old 04-09-2008, 04:49 AM
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LostinthePines LostinthePines is offline
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One of my scouts has one, so being the gear junkie I am, I checked it out. I'm 5'8'' tall and 165# and I found that it was too small. I brushed my head sitting up in it and it felt way to narrow. I liked the large vestible and side entry but only one side has a vestible. This lead to a bit of fun for that scout, as a wasp got under the non-vestible side and was hanging on the mesh wall. He had to pull the fly half off to get it out!
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  #9  
Old 04-09-2008, 03:30 PM
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Rickosovitch Rickosovitch is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FamilyGuy
The Hubba is nice, if not really narrow for wider folks.

Will you be using this in cooler months or even winter? If so, are you concerned that this is going to be one really cold tent as the fly will let breeze in (underneath)? Alternatively, are you concerned that when the outer fly does collect condensation that it can drip through the mesh? I ask because I believe you live in a very humid area. The Hubba HP looks like an interesting alternative for use in the shoulder months (still too narrow for me).

I plan to use the Hubba until I run into conditions it won't handle. I'm not at all concerned about condensation dripping through the mesh because the outer fly is pretty steeply sloped and I think condensation will run down the fly rather than dripping off it. Also, there's almost no way to brush up against the inner mesh hard enough to push it into contact with the outer fly, which is the main way I've had condensation get through to me in tents that have mesh inners. The Hubba's mesh is well away from the outer fly. The breeze coming in is part of why this tent ventilates so well. I don't mind the breeziness as I count on my sleeping bag and pad and sleeping clothes to keep we warm. I just want my tent to keep me dry. I also left this tent out during three days of rain recently and didn't get a drop of rain on the inside. Mind you, it wasn't a storm, so we'll see. But each morning when I wake up and can sit right up without even a thought to brushing the top of the tent I am a very happy little guy. I'm leaving the day after tomorrow for four days and nights up the North Umpqua trail, knowing I'm going to wake up dry and happy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LostinthePines
One of my scouts has one, so being the gear junkie I am, I checked it out. I'm 5'8'' tall and 165# and I found that it was too small. I brushed my head sitting up in it and it felt way to narrow.
This puzzles me. I'm 5' 10", 179 lbs. and one of my favorite things about this tent is that I can sit up without even coming close to brushing my head against the top of the mesh. And I sleep on an exped 9 downmat, which is over two inches thick even with me on it. It is narrow, but since I can't get wet by brushing the sides I've gotten used to it. Every tent makes some compromises. For me, here in the humid PNW, this is the best compromise between shelter, utility and carry weight. To each their own.

Last edited by Rickosovitch : 04-09-2008 at 03:35 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #10  
Old 04-16-2008, 11:21 AM
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Rickosovitch Rickosovitch is offline
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Just got back from doing 54 miles on the North Umpqua Trail with my new Hubba. The terrain is mostly very steep and it's a real challenge to find a place to pitch a tent well off the trail. The Hubba's footprint is very small and I was able to set up camp in several places where a tent requiring a larger footprint just wouldn't have worked. I also cooked in the vestibule (with my alcohol stove) just to see how well that would work. I unzipped the inner mesh tent all the way, and unzipped one half of the vestibule fly and propped it open with one of my trekking poles. There was no danger of a flame-up, such as sometimes happens with a Whisperlite, and not much heat rising anywhere near tent fabric. I cooked my breakfast in dry comfort, sitting on my exped downmat with my sleeping bag tucked up around me like a comforter. This is a wonderful tent.
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