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Shelters The Shelters forum is for the discussion of backpacking shelters (tents, tarps, poncho-tarps, bivy sacks,...).


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  #1  
Old 03-16-2008, 01:43 PM
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Gohawks Gohawks is offline
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Suggestions on Rigging Bug Netting in Tarp

My first ever tarp rigging today! Yes I will be replacing the yellow nylon rope with something more appropriate in the near future, and yes I will find a lighter ground cloth than that heavy black tarp. I just wanted to play around with the set up so i used what I had including wal-mart trekking poles that I scored for $5 a piece (I left all the tags on in case I decide to return them, but at $5 I'll probably keep 'em)

My question is: Does anyone have any suggestions for rigging a pyramind style bug netting in a tarp? I hope to camp without the net, but in the midwest (and elsewhere) the mosquitoes can be brutal. My answer was this personal bug net I purchased online. Its ~6 ounces. You can see how I rigged it in the pictures. I pulled the cord from the suspension point of the net verytically and horizontally to clip it to the guy line near the top on the trekking pole.







My concern is that in bad weather I could be a bit exposed? Because the suspension point is not at the far back of the netting, but located towards the center it makes it difficult to fully spead out the net, yet stay completely under the tarp.

I hope that makes sense.

If anyone has a better way of rigging please feel free to share what you have tried.

Thanks in advance.!

Last edited by Gohawks : 03-16-2008 at 01:51 PM.
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  #2  
Old 03-16-2008, 03:32 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Here are some generalized thoughts:

If the netting does not fit well under the tarp, there are a couple of options: 1) Go with a larger tarp; or, 2) Use smaller netting.

However, if the netting seems appropriate to your body/bag length and your tarp adequately covers your body with or without the use of the netting, then (as you know) it's a matter of positioning the netting.

The setup that you're using is the typical method. This should be fine in most situations (during bug season - depending upon location). When needed, you can make adjustments according to the direction of the wind and/or angle/direction of the rain.

Now I realize that this is a broad generalization, but in many cases the bugs are not present when it's pouring down rain. It's not always the case, but often true. So, if it's raining and there are no bugs don't use the netting. Likewise, if it's not raining (and there's no bothersome wind,...) then you may not need the tarp - just use the netting for the bugs.

Something to consider, that may be of help under the tarp, is to use some lightweight elastic cord to attach the netting to your trekking pole or simply put an adjustable knot in the cord. This will give you some flexibility in positioning and perhaps avoid problems with wind pulling on the netting when the tarp is being lifted (from any high wind) -- this, of course, is more meaningful if the tarp and netting are somehow connect together.

I hope these random thoughts are of some help.

Reality
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  #3  
Old 03-16-2008, 06:25 PM
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Trudy Trudy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gohawks
My concern is that in bad weather I could be a bit exposed?
Others here have more experience than I do, but wouldn't you be pitching the tarp lower in the rain?

Otherwise, it looks fine.

How big is the tarp?
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  #4  
Old 03-16-2008, 07:06 PM
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crgowo crgowo is offline
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what if you put some sort of ridgeline(if thats what you would call it) down the center of the tarp( from trekking pole to trekking pole) or tie a permanent cord from grommet to grommet on your tarp down the center so you have another place to hang your bug netting. Just tie some loop in the center of the cord so you can hang it from there.
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  #5  
Old 03-17-2008, 04:49 AM
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Gohawks Gohawks is offline
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Reality, points well taken. I never stopped to consider bug/mosquito activity during the rain may not be an issue, thanks.

Trudy, you are right. I was just trying to figure a way out of securing the netting so as to not leave myself exposed. Its just the way the netting is suspended that kind of forces you towards the front of the tarp. Hard to explain unless you see how the net is suspended

crgowo-

I like that idea, and will investigate further when time permits.

The tarp is an 8x10 by equinox.
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  #6  
Old 03-17-2008, 06:14 AM
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Trudy Trudy is offline
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Gohawks, what kind of bug net is that? I have looked at several on-line but can't decide. I need no-see-um mesh, not mosquito mesh.
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  #7  
Old 03-17-2008, 06:48 AM
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Gohawks Gohawks is offline
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trudy, it is made by stansport. I bought if off of ebay (it also came with a head net). It appears to be similar in dimensions to the one made by coghlan's, but the netting is green as opposed to white, that is why I went with this one.

The hang tag indicates no-seeum.
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  #8  
Old 03-17-2008, 07:59 AM
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Trudy Trudy is offline
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Thanks for the info.
At that price ($15) it would be worth buying and modifying. I think I would sew some tie-outs on it to improve the interior room and maybe add a floor.
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  #9  
Old 03-17-2008, 09:01 AM
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Gohawks Gohawks is offline
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There are 4 loops (one on each corner) to stake or tie out if desired. One suspension loop on the top.
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  #10  
Old 03-17-2008, 09:57 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trudy
I think I would sew some tie-outs on it to improve the interior room and maybe add a floor.
Those are two good points that I believe make practical sense as options to be included with (added to) lightweight netting.

Side tieouts (pullouts) are great for increasing interior space.

Often overlooked with floor-less netting (such as the Stansport Mosquito Net) are crawling/slithering pests (e.g. ants, spiders, scorpions, snakes...). Those who use netting without a floor generally opt for some type of groundsheet, so sewing on a floor and leaving the groundsheet at home is not that much more of a weight penalty and enhances the worthiness of the netting.

Note: If a floor is added to this netting, a doorway will also be needed (e.g. zippered opening,...). IMO, if one's going to alter this netting to the point of adding a floor, tieouts, zipper ..., might as well just start from scratch and use better (darker, nanoseeum) netting. Or simply purchase one of the already made net tents (e.g. MLD Serenity; SMD Serenity).

Reality
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