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Shelters The Shelters forum is for the discussion of backpacking shelters (tents, tarps, poncho-tarps, bivy sacks,...).


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  #1  
Old 02-12-2008, 12:09 AM
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Rickosovitch Rickosovitch is offline
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Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 310
Hilleberg Akto: First Impressions

After waiting since early November, my Akto finally arrived last week. I have slept out in it two nights now and I just love it. My feet don't brush the top of the foot of the tent when I'm lying on my back. There's plenty of room for stuff I like to have within easy reach while I sleep. The tent goes up easily and I don't mind having to mess with extra guy lines because I know that one of these nights I'll be hit by a wind that will make me glad of the extra support. There was no condensation inside in the morning and the vestibule is huge. I'm thinking of using it as a carport when I don't have both my external frame Jansport Scout pack and my snowshoes and poles in it. My head does occasionally lightly brush the top when I'm sitting up to cook with my stove in the vestibule (flap open) because my exped 9 downmat is much thicker than the Prolite 3 I'd been using, but I'm confidant my body won't mind adjusting its posture and movement as I get used to being in the nicest tent I've ever slept in. And the bright yellow inside is just plain cheery. Finally, this is the first tent I've ever bought that has a stuff sack that is more than ample. And all this for almost exactly the weight of my old SD Lightyear, which is a fine solo tent, but just not in the same league as Hilleberg. I'm really looking forward to a hike out on the coast in March. Should be some good strong winds for me to listen to while I relax. Snug and smug in my Akto!
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  #2  
Old 02-12-2008, 03:52 AM
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Gary_N9ZYE Gary_N9ZYE is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Indianapolis IN
Posts: 81
I received my Akto last November. I am well pleased with the quality and the design.
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  #3  
Old 02-12-2008, 08:12 AM
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FamilyGuy FamilyGuy is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 309
Outstanding. Enjoy the new Akto.

There have been some criticisms regarding the large stuff sacks that Hilleberg provides, but because they are larger stuffing the tent in is extremely easy. Plus packing it inside your pack actually takes up less space than you would think because your other gear simply compresses the tent.
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  #4  
Old 02-13-2008, 02:23 AM
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Dogwood Dogwood is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 62
Glad to hear U like the Atko. What is the wt.?
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  #5  
Old 02-13-2008, 10:57 PM
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Rickosovitch Rickosovitch is offline
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Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 310
Dog,
The weight is exactly 3 lbs. 5 oz., just as advertised. Mine actually weighs one half ounce less as I've swapped out the overly spacious stuff sack with another that fits easily but more snugly. I like to keep as trim a pack as possible.

I'll be going out again this weekend and will be in fairly deep snow and much colder conditions. It was from eight to ten degrees warmer inside the tent than outside. I'm eager to see what the difference is when the outside temp is lower than just freezing.
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  #6  
Old 02-26-2008, 07:05 PM
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mperry mperry is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 20
Great tent. I have used it in spring and fall, at temperatures in the 30s and 40s overnight. Very comfortable. I am 6' and find it to be spacious.
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  #7  
Old 03-02-2008, 04:07 PM
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Rickosovitch Rickosovitch is offline
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Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 310
Rain (condensation) on my Parade

After half a dozen bone-dry nights in my new Akto, I was shocked to awake last night and find the interior oozing condensation from seemingly every pore. I'm hoping some other Akto owner can shed light on this, so here's what happened: I got to a campsite exhausted from snowshoeing on steep slopes of hard snow and climbing over, through or around about 3/4 of a mile of blowdowns. So I pitched the tent and it didn't look right. Then I remembered you're supposed to stake down the four corners of the floor first. I had staked out the corner guy lines and then inserted the pole. But I was too beat (too dumb) to re-do it so I just put the floor pegs in. My guess is that the inner wall was thus left in contact with the outer wall. When I woke up at 2330 hrs. and saw all the condensation, I went out and tightened all the guy lines and opened both outer end vents and then the inner door vent. I mopped up most of the inside moisture, but in the morning it was pretty bad again. I've given this some thought and the main difference in tent site between the dry nights and last night was the last night I was in a bit of a depression, with a lot of brush around and where there was very little air movement. Other nights I've been in more exposed sites. I sure hope someone can point me in the right direction here. This is so radically different and disappointing compared to my earlier experiences with this tent.
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  #8  
Old 03-03-2008, 09:53 AM
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Random_Walker Random_Walker is offline
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Backpack: Arc'Teryx Needle 65
Sleeping Gear: WM Ponderosa
Shelter: MH SkyLedge
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: The PNW
Posts: 182
What was the temprature / weather (snowing, sleeting and or rain?)
Many times I have pitched the fly well off the ground, had all vents and doors open as far as possible while camping in those PNW damp cloudy foothills with wet slush falling out of the sky. It helps some...
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  #9  
Old 03-03-2008, 10:03 AM
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Rickosovitch Rickosovitch is offline
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Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 310
I've just spoken with Petra at Hilleberg, and at this point it's looking like I made a number of mistakes. So, I'm just waiting for another cold, rainy, snowy day to go try it again. This time I'll make sure to pitch the tent exactly according to instructions, leave wet gear out in the vestibule, and have all vents open right from the start. Once again, I'm really glad I make these shake-down overnighters. My tent and gear are all dried and ready for another go. I'd just hate to be having to deal with this while out on a multi-day hike. I'll post my test results ASAP.
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  #10  
Old 03-16-2008, 06:37 PM
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Crayfisherman Crayfisherman is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 26
when i first got my atko i had a similar experience in similar weather. on still nights, open as much ventilation as possible. i also tie the inner door back. a poster on one of the uk forums has had the ends of his inner professionally altered to put vents in similar to the vents on the outer and claims he is always absolutely dry in all conditions. if i was going down that route i would still tie the inner door open but put a full mesh door on the inner to slow down draughts on very cold nights and give some ventilation and insect proofing at warmer times. however i am not sure i could justify the cost as i more often just use the outer fly to sleep under with everthing open including the door, closing up only when the weather gets bad. since my first mistake i have managed to keep condensation down to acceptable levels and i am sure that as you get more experience you will too. regards from the uk
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