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Sleeping Gear The Sleeping Gear forum is for the discussion of sleeping gear (bags, mats, quilts...).


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  #11  
Old 10-13-2007, 06:24 AM
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Remnant Remnant is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 256
I tried to use a 30 degree bag year round in Missouri ( SlumberJack Superguide) but even supplementing with clothes it couldn't deal with winter in a hammock.
I now use a Campmor goose-down 0 degree
mummy
for winter, and use the SlumberJack for the other 3 seasons. I really like the Superguide, as the footbox is vented and it packs down to 7.5"X12". The only thing I don't like about it is that it's not full-zippered, but that's not a show-stopper.
Hope this helps...
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  #12  
Old 10-17-2007, 03:01 PM
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Flack_Jacket Flack_Jacket is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Michigan
Posts: 21
Well, I think I'm gonna go with the old Poncho w/ Poncho Liner Sleeping bag that I use to use in the Military, plus I think it'll also cut down on weight during the warmer months, and then go with a lower temp rated bag during late fall and winter months.
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  #13  
Old 10-28-2008, 04:26 PM
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brooklynkayak brooklynkayak is offline
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Backpack: 6 moon designs starlite
Sleeping Gear: Exped Wall Creeper Sleeping Bag
Shelter: Henry Shire Rainshadow
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 78
I am a big fan of layering bags. Why carry the extra weight and space of a winter bag in the summer.

I have two down 3 season bags. I'd rate both at approx 30 degrees f, even though the manufactures claim better.
I only bring one on most of my trips and bring both and layer them if I'm going in colder weather.
My main bag is a more expensive water resistant, breathable, hooded and spacious bag(Exped) and the other, a less expensive non-hooded, non-water restant and less spacious bag(Campmor). The combination makes a good water resistant winter bag.

This is quite common with the military of many countries.

What about one 40 degree bag for summmer, one 30 degree bag for spring and fall and both combined for winter?

Maybe one of the bag could be synthetic to resist water and the other down, to cut down on weight and space?

stevie
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  #14  
Old 11-16-2008, 03:02 PM
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bansko bansko is offline
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Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flack_Jacket
Well, I think I'm gonna go with the old Poncho w/ Poncho Liner Sleeping bag that I use to use in the Military, plus I think it'll also cut down on weight during the warmer months, and then go with a lower temp rated bag during late fall and winter months.

For what it's worth, when I retired from the Army I initially used a lot of my former military gear when I got back into recreational backpacking. I was familiar with it and trusted it, so it made sense, as I'm sure it does to you.

That said, six years down the road, I don't use a thing that I used back then. It all comes down to weight. Your'e on the right track though. If you don't want to shell out a lot of bucks right now go ahead with the poncho liner in the summer. Then look around for sales on a good 20 degree down bag. You'll find out quickly which bags are good and which aren't by consulting these forums.
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  #15  
Old 11-17-2008, 07:12 AM
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Kutenay Kutenay is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 81
I used a single bag all year 'round until I was past 30; this in BC where we have a large temp. gradient and highly changeable weather. One region, the "Chilcotin", mostly untouched wild country, ranges from 110*F in summer down to -45*F in winter.

I was too poor to afford more bags and used one single "Pioneer" down barrel bag from 1968-1973; this entailed about 150 nights per annum outside due to my wilderness employment and hunting, etc. It worked pretty well, but, I did "layer" with clothing and used a Blacks' of Greenock bivy plus a tarp from them.

In summer, no problem, I just used the bag as a quilt and in winter, I got by, but, some nights were not too pleasant.

I CAN use one of my current bags for everything, it is my Valandre Shocking Blue, an amazing bag that weighs only 3 lbs. in total and is good to -15. But, the problem here for you is it's high cost.

For one bag, I would buy the best 0 rated down and microfiber bag you can afford, my choice for best here, price considered and my build, as well, would be the Western Mountaineering Kodiak Microfiber at $470.00 and sometimes you can find a discount. This will handle winter and will work as a quilt in summer and the quality is firstclass.

HTH, I know how tough it can be to build your gear selection to meet all your needs.
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  #16  
Old 11-19-2008, 10:35 PM
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Jedval Jedval is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 10
Hi,

I had a similar problem a few years back. Of course having a sleeping bag for each season would be ideal, but that wasn't feasible for me at the time, or even now :( Anyhow, I ended up getting a Marmot Helium and it has worked much better than I thought it was gong to as a four season bag. And it is only 2 lbs.

I have found that I can extend the temp range of the bag by wearing a little more and by sleeping on a pad that provides a lot of insulation. (Exped Downmat 7).

I live and play in Idaho so the temps in the summer are usually around 40 give or take 10 degrees and in the winter it is usually between 35 and 5 during the night. I usually sleep in a snow shelter or a 4 season tent both of which help keep the temps a little higher than what is outside.

If I were to do it again I would say a 15 degree bag would be a pretty good choice for my situation, but I would get one with a full length zipper for venting in the summer and a draft collar for the winter.

Hope this helps,

Josh
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  #17  
Old 12-11-2008, 08:14 AM
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Takas Takas is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4
I need a sleeping bag that can cover most of the year for northern Arkansas. It's not uncommon for our winter temps to drop to 20 or lower. But just as often, it's 50 or even 60 degrees, often in the same week.

I have two bags at my disposal, but both of them are fairly specialized. I got a Kelty 45+ bag back in college when I could only hike during our unreasonably hot and humid summers, and I couldn't ask for a better bag for that use. (Before I got this bag, I used a jacket instead of a bag. This works a little better.) I also have access to a pair of Marmot -40(!) vapor barrier bags for Canada and Alaska trips, but short of the dawn of a new ice age or getting locked in an unusually cold walk-in freezer, I can't find a way to use them here.

I've been looking at the Ultra 20, and despite its advantages, I'm not convinced it's what I'm looking for. The fact that I could one for myself and one for my wife for under $500 is more than a little attractive, and it seems very well suited for our spring and fall. But since it's rated for 20 and a number of you seem skeptical that it would perform well at that temp, I'm hesitant to use it for my winter trips. It's 20º right now, and December isn't even our coldest month. I suppose I could use it as a layer on top of our summer bags.

My inclination is to get a flexible 10 or 15 bag for any time of the year when the temp might drop below 50. Does this sound like the right approach, and if so, do any bags come to mind?
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  #18  
Old 12-11-2008, 11:33 PM
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Jedval Jedval is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 10
The only bags I have experience with are Marmot bags. I have a Helium that is about 3 years old and my brother has a Pinnacle that he got this year. My Helium is lighter but it only has a half zipper and doesn't have a draft collar. The hood fits nice and snug, but there have been times when I would have liked to have a draft collar so I could loosen the hood and not have all the warm air in the bag vent. Also, while not a huge deal I would not buy a bag with a half zipper again, mostly because it makes it almost impossible to vent enough in the summer. My brothers Pinnacle is a really nice bag, it is quite a bit cheaper than the Helium, has a full length zipper, and a draft collar. It is a bit heavier, but I think it is more versatile. If I had the money I would by a Western Mountaineering bag, but the Marmot bags I have used have been more than adequate.

PS- One of the things that often gets overlooked is the importance of the pad. In the summer a Thermarest Prolite 4 is fine for me, but in the winter I would freeze if I didn't take my Exped Downmat.

Hope this helps,

Josh
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  #19  
Old 12-12-2008, 06:54 PM
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Kutenay Kutenay is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 81
The finest bags I know of are Valandre and they have a new model arriving here just post-Christmas. It is the "Bloody Mary" and is a gorgeous piece of gear; this would be my FIRST choice for you and, while costly, you WILL be thrilled by it, just as I am with my Shocking Blue.

I currently have eight bags and my next choice would be Western Mountaineering, and I feel their Microfiber models are, as I said, a real deal in a first quality bag. My Alpinlite Super or a Versalite would do very well for your needs and these are not too pricey.

If, you patiently check the various backpacking and backpack hunting forums, you can oftimes find these highend bags in new condition at steep discounts as guys buy, try, sell and buy to try again. Also, apparently "backcountry" and some of the other dealers are now having sales.
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  #20  
Old 12-31-2008, 10:57 AM
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Truefaith Truefaith is offline
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I have a 20 degree bag from REI, the Zephyr. I also have a cotton sleeping bag liner that I initially got for summer camping here in Texas. So if its cold out, I can put the liner in for an additional 5 degrees or so (they make better liners that can add 10ish degrees to the comfort rating), and can wear a down sweater if I need even more warmth.

Granted I rarely camp below 20, so generally the bag and liner are all I need. I also generally sleep in hot chilies when its cold out since I already have them on under my pants and as a base layer.

During the summer I just use the liner so I have something over me. I don't sleep well when I am hot, so it works out well. It helps that my tent is well ventilated as well.

I always figured if layering is good to regulate temperatures for clothes, why not apply it to my sleep system as well.

Hope that helps.
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