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Sleeping Gear The Sleeping Gear forum is for the discussion of sleeping gear (bags, mats, quilts...).


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  #11  
Old 05-25-2007, 06:21 AM
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c4jc88 c4jc88 is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Kodiak, Ak
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Like everyone else I think a wool or fleece hat will help. I also wear some Sierra Designs Down Booties even in summer. They make a huge difference and I think they were around 10 dollars at REI.

Jason B
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  #12  
Old 05-25-2007, 07:45 AM
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Mike_in_FHAZ Mike_in_FHAZ is offline
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Backpack: jam2
Sleeping Gear: 3 season TQ
Shelter: 10x11 hex tarp
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Fountain Hills AZ
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the most overlooked reason for being cold: dehydration
your body needs water to effectively maintain proper tempurature, warm or cold. On top of eating some high carb foods at bedtime, drink water with it!
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  #13  
Old 05-25-2007, 10:36 AM
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captn captn is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Location: Houston, we have a problm
Posts: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by spirit4earth
I need advice on how to stay warm in a way-too-optimistically rated bag. I have a Marmot Pounder Plus, which is rated to 25 degrees. I'm an average sleeper... On a 47 degree night, I was cold even with long-johns. On a 35 degree night, I was absolutely freezing! I had on socks, longjohns, pants, and four shirts.
Does anyone have thoughts about using a liner? Which liners are good? I can't afford a down bag right now, so I have to make this one work.

Thanks!

What were the other conditions? Were you wearing clothes? In a Tent? In a breathable Bivy? Hat on or off?

I have a Montbell #3 and I typically wear a Patagucci Micropuff Vest to bed along with a Thin Balaclava. When the temps drop I make sure I sleep in my Gatewood cape or a tent to retain heat, and use a lightweight breathable bivy sack as well.

Lastly, I made a light synthetic retangular quilt (48 x 72) to attach to the Bivy top out of half inch sythethic insulation and some nylon taffeta (12 oz total). I added some velcro along the edges and sewed the end to make a big enough foot box that the foot of my bag can fit inside it. This adds almost 20 degrees to my bag with a solid pad for insulation underneath me as long as I wear a good insulated hat to bed.

Just food for thought ... Bag @ 23 oz, Make your own Bivy @ 7 oz, and MYOG Quilt @12 oz gives me a good 10 degree sleep system for 42 oz (2.6 lbs), but minimizing cost at around $300 or so.

The quilt and bivy works for temps at 50 and above, the Bag works down to 30, with Bivy 25 or so, and all three to 10 degrees (especially in a tent).
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  #14  
Old 05-25-2007, 12:43 PM
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big_load big_load is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_in_FHAZ
the most overlooked reason for being cold: dehydration
your body needs water to effectively maintain proper tempurature, warm or cold. On top of eating some high carb foods at bedtime, drink water with it!

This bears repeating and emphasizing. My wife used to complain bitterly about being cold, even at temps 30 degrees above her bag rating. Finally, she grew desperate enough to take my advice ( ) and ever since has become a lot more diligent about maintaining proper hydration and food intake.
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  #15  
Old 05-27-2007, 11:43 PM
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Franco Franco is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 416
Me too

Yes good point about hydration. I had exactly the same problem with my wife, you can never tell her anything she always knows better. Needless to say the few times we hiked together she was cold at night. She never wanted to eat anything either during the hike ,( I munch often), so she always had the big crash, typically an hour or so before destination.
Franco
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  #16  
Old 05-28-2007, 06:41 PM
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Miner Miner is offline
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Backpack: ULA Conduit
Sleeping Gear: 20F Down Quilt
Shelter: Bivy and Tarp
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 121
I just got back from a weekend trip that really illustrates how other factors other then sleeping bag ratings effect how warm you sleep.

Friday night I drove from work to Tuolumne Meadows in Yosemite pigging out on the drive up. I stayed in the walk-in backpackers campsite since the campground was still closed. It was about 40F at 10pm though it would eventually fall to the low 30's by morning. I was sleeping in my Marmot Hydrogen 30F down bag out in the open. I was too warm and sweated the entire night.

Now come Sunday night at around 9pm, I forced marched out of the wilderness exhausted. I really had over exerted myself to get out by dark rather then stay another night as I wanted to drive back early on Monday since I had stuff to do at home (I'm paying for it today). The weather and temperatures were identical to what they were Friday. I'm back in the same campground only this time I have my bivy sack over the top of my sleeping bag which should give extra insulation. It was still about 40F at 10pm (same as Friday) and I was already cold and the temperature was going to drop.

The difference between Friday and Sunday night? I was physically exhausted and I wasn't nearly as well fed (I was well hydrated though) since I was on the go most of the time.

Last edited by Miner : 05-28-2007 at 06:46 PM.
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  #17  
Old 07-15-2007, 10:45 AM
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Finley_Thomas Finley_Thomas is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by spirit4earth
I need advice on how to stay warm in a way-too-optimistically rated bag. I have a Marmot Pounder Plus, which is rated to 25 degrees. I'm an average sleeper... On a 47 degree night, I was cold even with long-johns. On a 35 degree night, I was absolutely freezing! I had on socks, longjohns, pants, and four shirts.
Does anyone have thoughts about using a liner? Which liners are good? I can't afford a down bag right now, so I have to make this one work.

Thanks!

Replace that Marmot bag with one from Western Mountaineering. I'm a cold sleeper too but this is a company that honestly rates their bags' temperature range. I use my WM 30 degree bag down to 30 degrees and is actually keeps me warm (read it: I said warm, not barely holding onto my life) down to that temperature, even a little colder if I tighten the hood.
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  #18  
Old 07-15-2007, 02:36 PM
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Wayback Wayback is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 243
Which clothes one wears in one's bag is almost, if not equally, as important as what clothes are worn in the bag. Wearing the same dirty, sweaty clothes worn all day just carries the dirt and dampness into the bag and degrades the bag's insulating ability. Changing into a clean, dry set of longjohns, hat, and socks (or anything clean and dry) that have not been worn on the trail will make a big difference.

IMHO, omitting a spare set of clean, dry clothing (or even extra dry undergarments) is one of the major problems with many uber light packing lists. It might work in the desert or low-humidity areas in the west, but in the the east and mid-America I think it invites trouble.
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  #19  
Old 02-21-2008, 10:21 AM
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mrNatural mrNatural is offline
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using one of those chemical heat packs down by my feet makes 100% differance in comfort.
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  #20  
Old 02-21-2008, 11:14 AM
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tpeterson1959 tpeterson1959 is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 167
All of the above suggestions are great. I’d try the following:

Sleeping pad. Even a ¼ closed cell foam pad can make a huge difference. I had a scout complain of being cold on a night that got into the 50s despite being in a 20 degree bag. He wasn’t using a sleeping pad.

Hydration. If peeing at night is a problem, use a pee bottle. Also, take along some easy to get into camp shoes or sandals.

Wear a beanie. Wearing a beanie is the number one factor in my warmth.

Put on clean underwear and socks. If you need to add clothes, they should be clean, too.

Add a hot water bottle. Just the other night, my wife worked way too long on a project at her computer and ended up being severely chilled in our home. She filled a couple of 1 ltr soda bottles with hot tap water and was warm in a short time. Adding just a small water bottle to a sleeping bag can make a huge difference. Use the extra hot water for some hot chocolate, tea or decaf.

If you’re not camping in bear country or with a lot of rodents, keep a small snack to eat in the middle of the night.
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