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Shelters The Shelters forum is for the discussion of backpacking shelters (tents, tarps, poncho-tarps, bivy sacks,...).


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  #1  
Old 01-18-2007, 08:29 PM
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yippikiyo yippikiyo is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2006
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Leaving Guyline on Webbed Loops of Shelter

Hi,

For those who use tents, do you leave the cord on the webbed loops of your tent and/or tent fly during storage or do you remove them and replace for every trip? I remove mine because I worry that the constant squishing strain will damage the webbing somehow. Sure is a hassle to replace for every trip, especially in the cold, dark rain. Sometimes I wonder if I'm heading towards minimalism only because I'm a bit on the lazy side. But in the meantime, I'd like to take care of my tents.

Also, while I'm asking, what do you use those loops on the inside of the tent for? I've tied my clothes to them and hung my light from them. My ginormous TNF Basecamp (almost as big as a pop-up camper) has these loops all along the sides and ceiling. The salesperson said it could be used to 'guy-out' from the inside in case of a major wind. While I can't imagine the wind that would bend this thing, I also can't imagine how to guy-out from the inside and to what I'd tie to, the opposite side?

yippikiyo
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  #2  
Old 01-18-2007, 08:33 PM
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aroth87 aroth87 is offline
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I leave the guylines on my tarp while its stored. Normally they are loose enough that I'm not too worried about compromising the webbing.

Adam
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  #3  
Old 01-18-2007, 08:46 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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I leave my guylines on my tents/tarps, though have taken them off of a poncho-tarp on occasion.

I've used inside loops for hanging an LED light and even lightweight clothing at times.

Reality
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  #4  
Old 01-18-2007, 08:58 PM
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big_load big_load is offline
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I leave my guylines attached also. They're extra long, so I can tie up to rocks or trees if necessary. My main tent lacks inside loops, which I miss. I like being able to hang a light or some wet clothes.
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  #5  
Old 01-19-2007, 09:23 AM
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Seeker Seeker is offline
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i leave the tie outs tied to my tarps. if you're that worried, use a sliding knot of some sort at the tie-out loop end, that you can loosen up for storage, but can quickly pull on to tighten up again.

the inside loops can be used to string a clothesline or maybe they're for a gear loft, which is a sort of small trampoline/hammock thing that hangs from 3-4 points up near the 'ceiling' of a tent to hold 'stuff'.

as far as 'interior guy-outs', i've never heard of such a thing. i have 'hurricane bracing' inside the rafters of my house (diagonal pieces that go from low on one side to high on the other) to brace it from another direction (parallel to the ridgeline) but they're stiff braces. cables going in place of them wouldn't do the same thing. in a similar manner, i'm not sure interior guy-outs would work in your tent, unless you used your hiking poles and could fasten them to the loops somehow. make sense?
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  #6  
Old 01-19-2007, 12:07 PM
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chezrad chezrad is offline
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I attach my lines with a quick bowline so when its stored there is no excess pressure or wear on the webbing.
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Old 01-19-2007, 12:19 PM
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aroth87 aroth87 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chezrad
I attach my lines with a quick bowline

I do much the same, I tie a bowline or figure 8 on a bight, and then girth hitch the line to the webbing using that. To remove the line all you have to do is pull the line back through the loop you made, plus it relaxs easliy if there isn't any tension on the line.

Adam
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  #8  
Old 01-19-2007, 05:44 PM
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Dusty Boots Dusty Boots is offline
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Backpack: Depends on trip conditions. I have 4 to choose from. 2 Keltys, 1 Gregory, 1 MEC pack
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When I'm tenting, I'll pack a few lengths of parachute cord with my pegs, in their stuff sack. If needed, I'll attach them using the 'Loop Knot', as shown in my 'All Purpose Knots' video
The cord also doubles as guy lines during/for exceptional windy days/locations.
If Tarping, I add varying lengths of parachute cord to my tarp's integrated stuff sac and tie on a suitable length, when pitching the tarp. Each site is different and if need be, I can add a couple of lengths as needed, or just one short piece, to obtain a suitably taut tarp for variable 'pitches' or configurations. YMMV

Dusty
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  #9  
Old 01-23-2007, 08:34 PM
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jasonklass jasonklass is offline
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I always leave mine on. It just saves time when you're setting up. I don't think it causes any significant wear on the webbing of the tent guy-out points to pack it that way. If you think about it, it probably causes more wear to loop and unloop it through the webbing (due to friction) than it does to just leave it in place.
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  #10  
Old 03-02-2008, 08:18 AM
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Miker Miker is offline
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Tarp guyline carrying/storage

I carry my guylines in a stuffsack, not attached to my tarp. I use a 10' x 10' tarp. I carry 2 long(20ft) lengths and various shorter lengths to give me options come pitching time. My lifter cord (for side tie-outs) is a different colour and i always have a loop in one end of these for quick pitching. All my lines are carried neatly hanked. As a newbie to tarping i would like to hear what others do. Do you carry lines seperate or do you leave them attached to the tarp?
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