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Sleeping Gear The Sleeping Gear forum is for the discussion of sleeping gear (bags, mats, quilts...).


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  #11  
Old 08-29-2006, 04:36 AM
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Ohio_Trekker Ohio_Trekker is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: CVNP Lock 39 Trail Head
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Although I don't use a BA Aircore, I never go below freezing without using a foam pad under my Prolite 4, which I usually start carrying in the fall and bring along through the spring. A lot of bulk, but not much weight for the extra warmth the combination of pads provides. Although I think technically they aren't providing extra warmth, they are just preventing the warmth from transfering to the cold ground or visa-versa resulting in a feeling of extra warmth. I liken sleeping on cold ground to a heat sink on electronic components, and like to provide as much barrier as possible, which isn't happening when the down gets compressed under me!

I will often also bring along the foam pad if I know I am going to be relegated to designated camping areas where I'm not going to find a nice layer of duff for sleeping on.
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  #12  
Old 09-11-2006, 11:36 AM
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LtHiker LtHiker is offline
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Do not put boiling water in grocery store water bottles. They can deform and leak, I've seen it happen. The hard Nalgenes(clear) are the best, the poly(cloudy) ones deform but never have seen them leak.

Make sure that you don't have tight fitting clothes on that might be restricting your circ when you are laying down. I also might try a different pad. In the winter I use a ridgerest either alone or with a prolight 4 and I have never had cold problems.
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  #13  
Old 09-11-2006, 11:48 AM
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Seeker Seeker is offline
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my first thought when you mentioned the back pain, etc, was a circulatory/nerve problem. i'm not a doc, but am a strong believer in chiropractic based on my experience with a recurring neck and back problem. army docs gave me pain drugs and muscle relaxants. chiropractor fixed it in a few weeks. nerves are funny things. if you can, get checked out.

the other thing i noticed is the air mattress. personally, i find them cooler than a blue foam mat, though way softer. sort of like a hammock, as far as needing 'bottom insulation' goes. maybe try a blue pad on top of yours, using your normal bag with no long johns at first. obviously, carry the extra clothing with you, just in case, but see if the blue foam pad doesn't fix it.

good luck, and let us know what happens.
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  #14  
Old 09-11-2006, 02:45 PM
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Perkolady Perkolady is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
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Moondust,

One thing I just thought of and thought I'd pass it along...

I know nothing about your sleeping bag, but I do know that for me in the past, I've noticed that it seemed like if there was too much extra room in the lower half of my bag, I got colder, where with other bags that were somewhat snugger (but not TOO snug, thank you), it seemed warmer.

Sort of like too much extra space to heat up...

Perkolady
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  #15  
Old 09-16-2006, 01:45 PM
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Tide-HSV Tide-HSV is offline
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I know what you mean, Perk...

I owned a really nice North Face bag winter back in the early '70s. Although it wasn't sized "large," it was very generously cut, for a mummy. I'm small, and I could never warm it up, although the total loft was something like 12". I finally sold it to a bigger guy, who absolutely loved it. I remember one nightmare night at Icewater Springs, when I accepted a toke off unknown stuff* and ended up so messed up that I couldn't figure out how to get into that bag, other than to take off all my clothes (about 15 degrees F.). I shivered all night long. When I got home, I sold the bag (and made some good resolutions I've stuck to)...

*the offeror was out of New Orleans - I should have known better...
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  #16  
Old 09-17-2006, 08:53 AM
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diana_of_the_dunes diana_of_the_dunes is offline
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I also have a BA insulated air core mattress, and I get cold in it in temperatures below about 40°F. I usually feel it in my hips and not my legs, but it sounds like your legs might be extra-sensitive due to arthritis.

Instead of replacing your entire sleeping system, you might consider trying an Exped DownMat 7, which should also fit in the pad sleeve of your BA bag (assuming you have a rectangular pad already). I have a DM 9, and I use it by itself for winter camping. It's so well-insulated that when I lay down on it, I can feel the heat radiating up from underneath my body. I'm so happy with my DM 9 that I'm going to purchase a 7 with my REI dividend to use for 3 season backpacking.
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  #17  
Old 09-22-2006, 07:00 AM
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Slosteppin Slosteppin is offline
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I can identify with your problem

I've had a problem with lower legs getting cold for about 5 years. I have this most of the year, even at home. Only happens when I sit around to relax or try to sleep. I never have cold problems while I'm active!
I have talked with 2 doctors and both have said "Your circulation is good." No help yet.
I have found 2 things that give me relief. I wear long fleece socks, sometimes even with shorts and a T shirt. To sleep when it is colder I wear tights and short fleece socks.
I have noticed that as we get older (I'm 68) more problems develop. Some get solved and some we put up with.

Slosteppin
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  #18  
Old 08-26-2011, 11:06 AM
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Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
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Location: New South Wales
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Some years have passed since the O.P. here, but I would still like to add a couple of comments ~

It certainly sounded like a circulation problem, didn't it ?

* While thermal undewear and fleecy socks (and beanie, and maybe even gloves..) are obvious, it still has to be loose enough that it doesn't intefere with circulation.

* And with air-filled mattresses of any type, a more economical alternative to a thicker mattress is always to add a thin closed cell sleeping pad ~ as a couple of people had suggested there above..
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  #19  
Old 09-09-2011, 05:48 PM
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notredknee notredknee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moondust
I am having a problem with my legs getting cold when I'm sleeping (or trying to).

Try a trash bag over your legs, using your existing gear. I carry a trashbag for several purposes (waterprofing, sit pad, tablecloth, etc. That thin plastic will increase warmth a lot.
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  #20  
Old 09-17-2011, 12:59 PM
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HighMiler HighMiler is offline
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Backpack: Trailwise External-Frame with various bags
Sleeping Gear: Down-filled Quilts
Shelter: Tarp
 
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Location: Twisp, WA
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My wife had issues with cold legs, too, even wearing winter-weight fleece long johns. She insisted on sleeping on her air mattress for comfort. This was before insulated air-core mattresses came out. I finally added a foam pad to my load and slipped it in-between her bag and mattress at camp.

The next morning she claimed the best sleep she'd ever had while backpacking. The pad was full-length, 3/8" or 1/4" ensolite which weighed about 8 ounces or so. Pure insulation -- no real padding.

Then I found her a shorter sleeping bag -- one made for 5'-6" max. instead of 6'. Difference in bags is a lot more volume to warm up and keep warm. Now she sleeps even more comfy and toasty on her insulated air-core mattress in her properly-sized sleeping bag.
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