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Gear List The Gear List forum is the place to post your actual backpacking gear list, and to read what others have in their packs. Don't forget to specify weight.


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  #11  
Old 06-01-2006, 06:24 AM
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Travgirl Travgirl is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Location: Mid-Missouri
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Weee...thanks.

First off, The Pack. I know, it's heavy. But last summer I carried what they supplied and I ended up bruising my collarbones because it wasn't fitted properly. I researched extensively and I made this choice based on my body and me. So - it's staying. (Trust me, I know it's not the lightest choice.)

As for socks and chacos, due to the current status of my blistering feet those could possibly change. I guess I didn't really think my clothes are overkill...but obviously the consensus is that I need to reconsider and I will.

I tried to do my best to purchase the lightest gear that I could afford. I probably won't be able to replace anything for quite some time.

I forgot to put on there I will be taking a small ground sheet. I know, unncessary and probably heavy, but I discovered this weekend without one I missed it.

Oh, and the gaff tape is just a small amount rolled onto itself. And yes, anything that lotion-y that can be put into a smaller container will.

These are great suggestions - I'll get to work and see what I can do!
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  #12  
Old 06-01-2006, 06:57 AM
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gussomer gussomer is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
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Maybe you could take some lighter weight stakes and a lighter ground cloth as your share of the tent.

Also, maybe someone on here can give you advice of making the most of your meals...how can you get the most energy from your meals...some prescribe to olive oil with their meals.

Also, maybe forego cooking breakfast at least half of the time...take breakfast bars instead.

While on the trail, think of light weight as a process rather than a tangible. For instance, do you use a windscreen when you cook and a cozy for keeping meals warm? See the connection? If you filled up with water more frequently and less amount each time. If you ate your heaviest food items in the first few days of the trip. If you avoid getting sun burned and prevent blisters before they happen. If you watched a weather report the day you left and see that the forecast looks more favorable. If you could stock up with food along the way. If you could identify ways to pace yourself (ie HYOH) when hiking...focusing on breathing, proper pole planting, rest steps during ascending. These are just a few of the many examples. Lightweight is not just about the gear on your back. Even then, is your gear packed to optimize your center of gravity?

Based on your list, I am thinking you could easily drop 6 lbs. and not skip a beat. This may not seem like much, but look at it from a mathematical perspective. If your pack currently weighs 42 lbs. and you are able to shed 6 lbs., it is like hiking 6 miles instead of 7...thus if your total trip is 42 miles, the less weight could equate to 36 miles instead. Now, maybe there is a flaw in my logic but no one can tell me that 6 lbs. doesnt make a difference.

Maybe you should look at your gear list from another perspectice....in other words, with a pre-determined goal in mind. Your list is partitioned already...you should consider setting a goal to lose X amount of weight from each of your list subsections.

Also, consider asking yourself the following question for each piece of gear: How could I get by if I forgot this item? For instance, your pack cover...I bet you could come up with a few different answers. Emergency rain poncho, large trash bags, trash compactor bags, tent groundcloth and tape.

Heck, if Survivorman can survive for 7 days on next to nothing in the dead of winter......

Last edited by gussomer : 06-01-2006 at 07:11 AM.
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  #13  
Old 06-01-2006, 07:10 AM
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Travgirl Travgirl is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Location: Mid-Missouri
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Uh, those Micropur tablets take 4 hours!!! That seems like a lot of time if you run out of water...
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  #14  
Old 06-01-2006, 07:48 AM
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Perkolady Perkolady is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 978
My Two Ounces worth...

Travgirl,

I spent two years as a volunteer backcountry ranger in the Pemigiwasset Wilderness area of the Whites back in the 80's and I can tell you that you do need to be prepared for even the possibility of SNOW in August! It DOES happen! It may not be probable, but it's POSSIBLE.

The temp changes there can be severely drastic in a matter of an hour or two.

As far as your clothing goes,I understand that your list included what you'd be WEARING.
I would say to just pack 2 pr. of socks, 2 undies, and only one pair of shorts. There are plenty of streams to get washing water from to wash things out some as you go. There are many areas above treeline, and if you take a break up there to enjoy the views, you can lay out your wet things on one of the MANY large, WARM rocks to dry in the sun and you'd be surprised how quickly stuff can dry.
You could maybe ditch the convertible pants too. If it gets cold , you can always wear your rainpants over your longjohn pants.
OR maybe bring another lightweight longjohn bottom instead of the conv. pants.

I would ditch the nalgene in favor of the sportsdrink bottle AND maybe a collapsible water bottle. (It can be a LONG, STEEP hike to water in some places- you may not want to go twice)

You may also want to consider either a lightweight poncho or small tarp.
Not that you'd want to WEAR the poncho (the wind is FAMOUS in the whites for ripping off peoples packcovers up there!), but it can rain very suddenly and HARD and it might be nice to have a way to get out of the rain to eat a meal....

I also recommend silnylon stuff sacks. Those stuff sack weights sure do add up after a few!

Sounds like you have a very good list going

<sigh>... I wish I was going with you...
Have a great trip !!!!
Well, that's my two ounces worth...
Perkolady
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  #15  
Old 06-01-2006, 09:13 AM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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Backpack: Osprey Atmos 50
Sleeping Gear: DIY down quilt
Shelter: ENO Doublenest Hammock, WB Bugnet, GG Tarp
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Nacogdoches, TX
Posts: 1,610
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travgirl
Uh, those Micropur tablets take 4 hours!!! That seems like a lot of time if you run out of water...

Read the packaging about what they treat. Micropur tablets kill cryptosporidium, giardia, bacteria (like e.coli and leptospirosis among others), and viruses. Iodine kills all of those EXCEPT cryptosporidium. Crypto is a VERY resilient parasite that has a durable outer casing. The ONLY way to deal with crypto quickly is by using a microfilter. Crypto is the reason micropur suggests a 4 hour wait time, and that long wait is a safety cushion for worst case water. A breakdown of inactivation times is listed here.

I carry both a pump filter and a chemical treatment for the fastest, most thorough treatment of suspect water supplies. That way, the pump takes out the big stuff, and the chemicals are for viruses and other stuff. Sure, my option weighs a lot, but it's worth the weight for me.
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  #16  
Old 06-01-2006, 10:40 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travgirl
Uh, those Micropur tablets take 4 hours!!! That seems like a lot of time if you run out of water...

It takes 4 hours to kill Crytosporidium in cold water - about 30 minutes in warmer water. You're carrying iodine. It is difficult to kill Giardia with it, and it's generally not effective for killing Cryptosporidium. So, the 4 hours is meaningless, since killing parasites is not your apparent goal. Micropur kills bacteria and viruses in just 15 minutes. It's recommended to use iodine longer than that.

You can be drinking out of a couple of your other bottles, while the Micropur is doing its thing in a hydration bladder or another bottle. Or continue to carry iodine with tastes bad, stains, is volatile, and not very effective against certain parasitic pathogens.

Reality
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  #17  
Old 06-04-2006, 10:08 AM
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guru guru is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Location: Chattanooga, TN
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Thumbs up

Okay so here’s my opinion. It will require you to put some money into it, but you can add or change as you see fit. Okay here goes.. ditch everything and keep:

InsulSeat – since you really like it.
Leki poles
Headlamp
Kelty 25*
Pocket Rocket – although you could go with an alcohol stove here
2 8 oz isopro fuel cannisters

titan kettle
lighter (Bic, pink if anyone cares )
1 lexan spoon
1 box waterproof matches
3 or 4 pairs of wool socks and maybe 2 or 3 pairs of liners – you only need 1 pair of socks and no linersChaco sandals – use crocs or waldies for camp shoes
1 or 2 pairs of shorts – ditch the convertible pants and only take one pair of shorts to hike in
2 t shirts – you only need one t shirt
2 sports bras – you only need one SB, perhaps 2
4 pairs of underwear – you only need one pair of underwear, perhaps 2
precip jacket
midweight long underwear bottoms
midweight long undwear top
contact case
small bottle solution
glasses w/case
sunglasses w/ case
baby wipes
sunscreen
bug spray
small amount of Dr. Bronners
pocket knife – a swiss army classic will do everything you need
toothbrush/paste
hairbrush w/ties (folding kind with built in mirror)
whistle
chapstick
3 bandanas (1 for pee rag, 2 for other stuff) – you could get by with 2 bandanas
head net
p cord
gaffers tape (similar to duct tape)
small journal w/pen
small digital camera
Trash bags (for food and babywipes)

I would get a new pack like the Granite Gear Virga or Vapor Trail. Also look at Gossamer Gear and ULA’s packs. Try to get something in the 1-2 lbs. range. Go with a ¾ length sleeping pad. The Thermarest prolite 3 or 4 is nice and light. You could use your insulseat under your feet at night. Go with a sil-nylon pack cover and sil-nylon stuff sacks. Ditch the nalgene bottles. They’re almost ½ lbs each empty. Go with Evian, Dasani or Aquafina 1 liter water bottles. I believe they’re about 1 oz. each. Use Aqua Mira for water treatment. Iodine tastes horrible and doesn’t get rid of everything. I didn’t see what you’re using for a shelter. You dont need the precip pants. If you feel the need for rain pants look at the Go-lite Reed pants. They're 4 oz and waterproof/breathable. I could take two pairs of hiking socks and no liners. The second pair of socks can be used for camp if your feet are wet, or you can use them over your gloves to keep your hands warm. I would also ditch the boots and go with trail running shoes like the Montrail Vitesse or Hardrock.

I would look at Henry Shires Tarptents or Gossamer Gear’s line. The SpinnShelter is really nice by GG. You don’t need all the clothing. When you put on a clean pair of shorts or underwear you will smell fresh for about 20 minutes. After that, you will stink again. To me there’s no point in it. But, I do understand psychology you might feel better or cleaner – so there’s really no wrong or right in it. I would look at getting a Western Mountaineering Flight vest or jacket. They will keep you much warmer than any fleece out there. They’re ultralight and very warm.

Most of my suggestions will cost money. But, they should get you a base weight close to 10 lbs. This should help lyou hike longer and reduce the fatigue a heavy pack brings.
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  #18  
Old 06-04-2006, 09:17 PM
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Ben2World Ben2World is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travgirl
I tried to do my best to purchase the lightest gear that I could afford. I probably won't be able to replace anything for quite some time.

Another 2 ounces of suggestion... If there's a piece or two that you wouldn't mind swapping out -- except for the money you had just spent buying them -- look to Ebay! It's easy as heck to use, and you can often get your money back or even make a small profit -- particularly if you have bought your gear on sale and they are in "near new" condition!

I once sold a "lightly used" sleeping bag for $1 more than what I paid for NEW!
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  #19  
Old 06-05-2006, 06:04 AM
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Travgirl Travgirl is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Location: Mid-Missouri
Posts: 36
You kind of helped answer my next question: Is 1 pound worth $100? I could save 1 pound if I trade in the ridgerest and insulseat for a prolite 3 and the thermarest convertable chair. So, that's probably going to happen.

I appreciate and understand why you are telling me to take less underwear. However, if girls sit around in wet undies bad things can happen. It's more or less so I can prevent an infection.

I sat down with my food scale and took a hard look at a couple things on the list. I'm going to try and pack up and go to the post office sometime this week.

But it might be in vain, the new boots I picked up aren't working out. (see blister thread)

Okay fine. I'll conceed to the aqua mira.
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  #20  
Old 06-05-2006, 07:43 AM
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gussomer gussomer is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Cache Valley, Utah
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So, roughly how much does your pack weigh right now?
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