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Hammocks The Hammocks forum is for the discussion of backpacking hammocks and related sleep systems.


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  #1  
Old 04-15-2013, 01:13 PM
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Robislookin Robislookin is offline
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Backpack: 55L molle pack
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Location: Panama City Beach, FL
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Searching for a hammock

I am a lamb in the woods when it comes to backpacking as I stated in my introduction. Please take that into account with my questions. Your help is greatly appreciated.

I am lookin for a hammock for my sleeping system and have been searching all over the net reading reviews and watching videos and have found several options. I would like some unvarnished reviews from people that have tried more than one so that I can have a true educated opinion about these hammocks.

These are the hammocks that I have found that are of interest to me. If you have more that I have not listed please mention them.

Tell me what you like and dislike about each in detail please. I want an educated assessment so that I can make an educated choice.


Jungle Hammock by Mosquito Hammock. I am leaning to this one because of the price, the size, and having the netting off the face. I am a big man at 6’ 300lbs. I know that it is not an ultra-light but I am lookin for light not ultra-light for the time being.

Bear Mountain Bridge Hammock Deluxe by Jacks ‘R’ Better I’m not sure about this because of the reviews about shoulder width, swinging issues, and price. What I like is the huge tarp so that I can do almost anything without worrying about the sun or rain. (live in Florida)

NX-250 by Clark Jungle Hammock my main issue with this is the price. What I like is having the netting off the face.

Deep Jungle XL by Hennessy Hammock my main issue with this is the price. What I like is the snake skins for ease of setup and take down.
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  #2  
Old 04-16-2013, 09:56 AM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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Backpack: GoLite Pinnacle
Sleeping Gear: Moonstone Lucid 800 w/Neo Air pad
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Location: Texas
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The Grand Trunk Skeeter Beeter Pro has netting that will stay off your face, is relatively inexpensive, a reasonable weight, and is rated to 400 lb. You'll need to rig your own tarp over it and there is no convenient way to add an underquilt for colder temps, which may not be a problem in Florida. They do offer a sleeping bag that the hammock slips through, but then you lose your mosquito protection, however, they also have a bug net system that would go over all of that.

I bought their regular Skeeter Beeter for my wife. With her back and hip problems, it's difficult for her to sleep on the ground in a tent. In moderate temperatures, the hammock has worked well for her. Once, we camped in a big storm and I rigged a tarp overhead and put my sleeping bag and pad on the ground under the hammock and we barely got a drop on us in a torrential downpour.
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  #3  
Old 04-16-2013, 03:20 PM
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Kylemeister Kylemeister is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robislookin
Jungle Hammock by Mosquito Hammock. I am leaning to this one because of the price, the size, and having the netting off the face. I am a big man at 6’ 300lbs. I know that it is not an ultra-light but I am lookin for light not ultra-light for the time being.

[snip]

NX-250 by Clark Jungle Hammock my main issue with this is the price. What I like is having the netting off the face.


I have a friend who has a Clark Jungle Hammock. He absolutely loves it. He was the first in our group to move from tents to a hammock. A couple of us have followed suit.

My pockets aren't as deep, and I wasn't sure if the hammock scene was for me or not. I bought one of the Jungle Hammocks from Tom Claytor. Shipping time was about 2½ weeks if memory serves.

Likes:
The "envelope" design of the bottom of hammock so that a thin foam pad can be inserted between the bottom two layers is a nice feature in my book. This adds a little "structure" to the hammock and gives a little insulation (though not an extreme amount).

The bug netting is good quality. While it doesn't ship with a spreader bar for the netting, it's easy to make one from branches in the field. It gives a little more roomy feel. There are pockets for a spreader bar to sit in, and the top has an elastic sort of feel to it so it kind of self-tensions.

There are pockets inside the hammock for storing things. My girlfriend reads before bed as part of her nightly rituals, and the hammock accommodated a Kindle with no issues.


Neutral:
The fly. The fact that it uses two stakes is stellar and makes for quick, easy setup. The downside is the unknown of how it will perform in a wind-driven rain. I haven't experienced inclement weather with it yet, so I can't truly say.

Zipper arrangement means you enter from one side of the hammock. I believe the Clark has zippers on both sides of the netting. Doesn't bother me, but it might mess with some folks.


Disklikes:
I just didn't care for the stock straps. Might work well for some people. I replaced the straps, and incorporated some quick adjust buckles similar to the double D-ring setup on a motorcycle helmet. I can adjust the hang without having adjust at the tree. Quicker & easier.


For the money, I think it's hard to go wrong with a Claytor as your first investment. The bang for the buck is going to be hard to beat in my opinion.
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  #4  
Old 04-16-2013, 10:17 PM
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Robislookin Robislookin is offline
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Backpack: 55L molle pack
Shelter: Kelty Noah 16
 
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Location: Panama City Beach, FL
Posts: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandpa
The Grand Trunk Skeeter Beeter Pro has netting that will stay off your face, is relatively inexpensive, a reasonable weight, and is rated to 400 lb. You'll need to rig your own tarp over it and there is no convenient way to add an underquilt for colder temps, which may not be a problem in Florida. They do offer a sleeping bag that the hammock slips through, but then you lose your mosquito protection, however, they also have a bug net system that would go over all of that.

I bought their regular Skeeter Beeter for my wife. With her back and hip problems, it's difficult for her to sleep on the ground in a tent. In moderate temperatures, the hammock has worked well for her. Once, we camped in a big storm and I rigged a tarp overhead and put my sleeping bag and pad on the ground under the hammock and we barely got a drop on us in a torrential downpour.


Thank you, grandpa, for the info. I had not found this hammock company before in my endless search for knowledge on the net. I do like the hammock you recommended and the price is defiantly right. But I am lookin for more of a 3 to 4 season hammock. If I can even call my area a 3 season area, but I eventually want to do at least a section or two of the AT. And I know that I will need at least a 3 season hammock at that time. And I really do not have the money to invest in more than one piece of the same equipment. But thank you for introducing this company to me. I checked them out and I might buy their pillow, it looks good.
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  #5  
Old 04-17-2013, 12:38 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robislookin
I am a lamb in the woods when it comes to backpacking as I stated in my introduction. Please take that into account with my questions. Your help is greatly appreciated.

I am lookin for a hammock for my sleeping system and have been searching all over the net reading reviews and watching videos and have found several options. I would like some unvarnished reviews from people that have tried more than one so that I can have a true educated opinion about these hammocks.

These are the hammocks that I have found that are of interest to me. If you have more that I have not listed please mention them.

Tell me what you like and dislike about each in detail please. I want an educated assessment so that I can make an educated choice.


Jungle Hammock by Mosquito Hammock. I am leaning to this one because of the price, the size, and having the netting off the face. I am a big man at 6’ 300lbs. I know that it is not an ultra-light but I am lookin for light not ultra-light for the time being.

Bear Mountain Bridge Hammock Deluxe by Jacks ‘R’ Better I’m not sure about this because of the reviews about shoulder width, swinging issues, and price. What I like is the huge tarp so that I can do almost anything without worrying about the sun or rain. (live in Florida)

NX-250 by Clark Jungle Hammock my main issue with this is the price. What I like is having the netting off the face.

Deep Jungle XL by Hennessy Hammock my main issue with this is the price. What I like is the snake skins for ease of setup and take down.

be aware that most of the tarps you've listed have max weights in the 200-250 pound range. this isn't just for the suspension but also the fabric and construction. sometimes it's conservative with fudge factor but not 20%+ fudge factor.

hammocks are generally built for them skinny hikers.

ENO's hammocks are actually tested and rated to 400+ pounds. you will have to source the bugnet and tarp separate, but the hammocks themselves are under a c-note.
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  #6  
Old 04-17-2013, 12:11 PM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: GoLite Pinnacle
Sleeping Gear: Moonstone Lucid 800 w/Neo Air pad
Shelter: Tarptent Sublite Tyvek & Tarptent Double Rainbow
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 430
Robislookin,

Thank you for the heads up on Mosquito Hammock's product line. It gives me some more options to consider for the future that are more in my budget area.
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  #7  
Old 04-22-2013, 04:04 PM
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nogods nogods is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kylemeister
I have a friend who has a Clark Jungle Hammock. He absolutely loves it. He was the first in our group to move from tents to a hammock. A couple of us have followed suit.

My pockets aren't as deep, and I wasn't sure if the hammock scene was for me or not. I bought one of the Jungle Hammocks from Tom Claytor. Shipping time was about 2½ weeks if memory serves.

Likes:
The "envelope" design of the bottom of hammock so that a thin foam pad can be inserted between the bottom two layers is a nice feature in my book. This adds a little "structure" to the hammock and gives a little insulation (though not an extreme amount).

The bug netting is good quality. While it doesn't ship with a spreader bar for the netting, it's easy to make one from branches in the field. It gives a little more roomy feel. There are pockets for a spreader bar to sit in, and the top has an elastic sort of feel to it so it kind of self-tensions.

There are pockets inside the hammock for storing things. My girlfriend reads before bed as part of her nightly rituals, and the hammock accommodated a Kindle with no issues.


Neutral:
The fly. The fact that it uses two stakes is stellar and makes for quick, easy setup. The downside is the unknown of how it will perform in a wind-driven rain. I haven't experienced inclement weather with it yet, so I can't truly say.

Zipper arrangement means you enter from one side of the hammock. I believe the Clark has zippers on both sides of the netting. Doesn't bother me, but it might mess with some folks.


Disklikes:
I just didn't care for the stock straps. Might work well for some people. I replaced the straps, and incorporated some quick adjust buckles similar to the double D-ring setup on a motorcycle helmet. I can adjust the hang without having adjust at the tree. Quicker & easier.


For the money, I think it's hard to go wrong with a Claytor as your first investment. The bang for the buck is going to be hard to beat in my opinion.
I own two Claytors - agree completely.
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