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Camping The Camping forum is for discussion that relates directly to wilderness camping (commonly referred to as car camping).


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  #1  
Old 07-08-2007, 10:03 AM
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Perkolady Perkolady is offline
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Fun Teaching Kids Outdoor Skills

Recently, my daughters and I were reminiscing about some of our camping trips we went on when they were younger. Many of our trips included some sort of outdoor skills learning activities, which were loads of fun, and often had quite humorous results! I thought I'd share a couple...

"Treasure hunts" were a big hit. This was great to help teach them some navigation skills. Besides visual clues, I would also give them a simple compass and nature guide books, which they would use to locate the next clue. The 'treasures' would usually be something like the makings of smores, or money for ice cream, or even something like a notepad and pens. They also learned a great deal in the process about geo. terms and different rock, tree, and plant types, since sometimes they had to look things up in a guidebook to see what things looked like.

One of the funniest was "Barbie Survival". Each of their Barbies had to survive in the wild for 3 days with only 3 things (they got to choose), along with whatever they could 'find'.
Then, they had to deal with shelter, water, etc., and once they had things situated, they each had to show the rest of us how their Barbie was going to survive. It really got them to think about things carefully.
Well, one daughter made a little stick/leaf wickiup type shelter, and decided she could scoop water out of the creek with a makeshift large leaf 'cup', and even gathered some wild edibles, and had no problem getting a fire started with her firesteel (They weren't allowed to use lighters or matches yet).
My younger daughter was VERY resourceful. She found a can for water, a ziploc bag (so Barbie didn't have to get wet or dirty- bivy?? lol ), and for her shelter, she had found and rigged up a discarded bra as a hammock for Barbie! LOL!! You never know what kids will come up with

What are some ways you teach your kids outdoor skills?

Perkolady
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  #2  
Old 07-21-2007, 01:20 PM
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SwampFoot SwampFoot is offline
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I'm not real good good at coming up with games, but I usually let Boo carry a map and let her navigate (with close supervision of course). So far she has done really well at keeping track of where we are and where we are going. She really has started to get into animal tracks, bugs, scat and other cool stuff. I usually try to bring along a guide book of some sort that she can use.

I guess that I am not really original, but we sure have a good time!

Steve
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  #3  
Old 12-04-2007, 09:49 PM
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BeaverTrapper BeaverTrapper is offline
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Quote:
One of the funniest was "Barbie Survival". Each of their Barbies had to survive in the wild for 3 days with only 3 things (they got to choose), along with whatever they could 'find'.

That's outstanding! I'm going to substitute 'Power Ranger' for Barbie.
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Old 07-04-2009, 02:57 AM
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tonto tonto is offline
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News Flash: G.I. Joe Gets Voted Off The Island!!

Getting kids into nature & camping is the main reason I'm still involved as a scout leader after my boys aged out.
I'm still not sure who gets a bigger kick out of a kid solving a challenge-- him or me.

P.S.-- I think Barbie can kick G.I. Joe's butt after reading this post!!

Last edited by tonto : 07-04-2009 at 03:02 AM.
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  #5  
Old 07-04-2009, 07:17 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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my youngest picked up on how to use the firesteel just through observation. she's a smart one, at two. my son, at four, got the idea quick, but needed to be shown the correct pressure.

teaching older kids, in many times, has been a 'here, check this out' quietly said during one of the day-gatherings. something about creating that 'i'm gonna show you a secret' atmosphere really works with my nephews. the looks on their faces when i showed them how to make stone knives this year were priceless. they got such a kick out of making 'caveman knives' that i'm really going to have to sit down and try teaching them proper knapping. the responsible ones, anyways.
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Old 09-26-2009, 01:19 PM
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ellyann ellyann is offline
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my son loves car camping that we started this year (wish i had started him younger) our biggest challenge was learning to enjoy hiking, he just couldn't get into it even while my best friend who is a regular nature guide for local parks and I would show him how to Id aniamles, birds, and plants. Then we took him geocaching total different kid, he loves holding the gps (around his neck offcourse) and helping to locate the caches. so now his favorite thing about camping besides getting to pee outside(he is 5 and boy go fig) is treasure hunting.
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Old 11-23-2009, 03:13 PM
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tpeterson1959 tpeterson1959 is offline
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10 Plants and 10 Animals

One of the earliest requirements for Boy Scout rank advancement are to find 10 plants and 10 animals. I did it when I was 11 and I've done it on almost every trip since.

I taught it to my kids and then to the scouts I worked with.

I don't always get a full 10 (especially hard in the desert or in winter) but the trips are always more enjoyable because we observe what's around us.
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Old 09-12-2010, 08:05 PM
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GingerSnap GingerSnap is offline
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Not having children of my own, my partner and I steal our nephews for camping outings. To convince them to learn new things, we usually give them special tasks that each one is in charge of--at the very beginning, it was pointing out all the trail blazes, and noticing where different trails went off, or identifying poison ivy plants along the trail.
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  #9  
Old 09-13-2010, 12:46 AM
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tonto tonto is offline
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A Quest For Fire

Human curiosity works in my favor.
I find my young charges receptive if I keep up on my skills.
I strive at not thwarting youthful enthusiasms.
Especially with pyrotechnics.
I click with Dsuursoo's application of stealth education.
A casual enthusiasm sparks their interest.
The flame of primal enlightenment in a kid is a personal rush.
They become a link in the chain.
And the primitive knowledge is handed down from the ancestors.

Last edited by tonto : 09-13-2010 at 01:21 AM.
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