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Gear List The Gear List forum is the place to post your actual backpacking gear list, and to read what others have in their packs. Don't forget to specify weight.


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  #1  
Old 04-24-2008, 08:26 AM
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Holubar Holubar is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 19
Alaska Gear List

Here is my 3 season gear list for Alaska.

Some explanations for why I carry some seemingly ‘needless’ items:

· I carry a summit pack for excursions away from ‘base camp’. In it, I carry a survival kit, 1st aid kit, raingear/clothing and my .44 is strapped to the waistbelt. The items with an asterisk* go in this pack when I’m exploring away from camp.
· I carry a bear gun instead of pepper spray for several reasons:

First, pepper spray is about 75% effective against grizzlies/brownies. Firearms average 85-90%. Black bears sometimes find pepper spray pleasant, I consider it ineffective against them.

Second, wind can work against me using pepper spray. It is often windy where I hike. The last thing I want, is to be incapacitated by my own weapon while a bear mauls me or a bull moose stomps me into the ground.

Third, if a bear decides to ‘visit’ me in my tent, pepper spray is, again, a liability, not an asset.

I am not afraid of bears. You shouldn’t be either. But we have a lot of them in Alaska.
In the lower 48 I didn’t, {and still wouldn’t} even carry pepper spray, so if you hike in the states, don’t worry about them.
{But don’t sleep with a tuna sandwich in your tent either!}

· I use a tent instead of a tarp because of bears/mosquitoes/weather. A tarp is not a wise option up here.
· I carry the cold weather gear because it can get very chilly during the summer months.

In fact many things on my list I never used to carry when I lived in the states. The weather in the states is usually better, the terrain is easier, and man is usually at the top of the food chain. This is just MY list for where I live now.
I do envy you guys with the sub-twenty pound packs. But up here it would be impractical, uncomfortable and potentially life threatening to camp in the super-ultralight style.

· I carry the luxury items because I want to.

Pack weight:

I have a dry pack weight of 29.75 lbs. which includes all the items on the list below.

The 2 person items are in Italics. That is, these are substitute items I carry when I go with someone else.

All weights are in ounces.


Kitchen
Cook kit –GSI 12
Water Filter - MSR Hyperlight 9.6
Kitchen kit - dish soap, salt/pepper, oil, spork, etc 4.75
Coffee Cup- Thermos Backpacker, insulated 11.5
Ligher-Windmill 2
Stove-MSR dragonfly 17.5
Fuel bottle 4.75
Camelback hydration bladder 4.5
Plastic garbage bags 0
Paper towels 1
Nalgene collapsible canteens-1.5ltr {2ea} 2.5
Dry bag- Sea to Summit, {Bear bag, for food} 1
Bowl- GSI collapsible 2.8

Sleeping / Shelter
Tent/poles/ftprnt – MSR Hubba/Fibreplex/Spinsheet, Solo trip 51
Tent/poles/ftprnt – Bibler Torre/ Fibreplex/Spinsheet, 103
2 Person trip

Siltarp 8 X 10- Integral Designs, 2 person trip {cooking/rain shelter} 17.25
Siltarp 5 X 8- Integral Designs, Solo trip, {cooking/rain shelter} 9.8*
Sleeping bag- Mt Hardwear, Phantom, 32 Deg. 28
Sleeping pad- Big Agnes, Insulated air core, 72” 20
Pad pillow stuffer- Modified Thermarest cover 2.25
Campstool- Camp Specialties ‘Blue Pack Stool’ 14
Trekking poles- 20 year old Leki collapsible ski poles 0
Pack rainfly- Integral Designs 3
Backpack- GG Nimbus Ozone w/lid 52
Inner Layer
MTS undershorts 2
Silk t-shirt 2
Silk long bottoms 3.25
Silk long sleeve 3
Down shirt- Montebell U.L. down jacket 6*
Socks, 1pr 2.25
Outer Layer
Raingear- SD Isotope jacket/ GoLite Reed pants 11.5*
Windbreaker- SD Ultralight, {wind and mosquito protection} 3.5
Gloves, light- generic polypro 1
Gloves, nitrile rubber, {rain wear} 0.25
Gloves,nylon 1
Folding cap 1
Balaclava, insulated- Bozeman Mt Works, Cocoon 60 2
Balaclava, light, REI MTS 1.5
Mirracool bandana- {Hydrated weight} 10
Footwear
Hiking boots 0
gaiters-short 0
Aqua socks- Nike {Campwear, totally worth the weight} 13.5
Toiletries
Medicine 0.5
wet-ones 0.25
trowel 1
Toilet Paper 0.5
Towel-MSR packtowel, small 0.5
Toothbrush 0.25
Accessories
Bugdope 1.5
Sunscreen/lip balm 1.25
Electrolite capsules 0.25
Watch- Casio G-Shock 1.5
Treo- {cell phone, PDA, bookreader, etc. etc.} 4.5*
i-pod Shuffle + headphones- 0.75*
Camera- Canon Elph 6.75*
Binoculars- Nikon Sportstar 8 X 25 11.25*
Walkie Talkie- Motorola FV200 {2 person trip, weight = each} 3.25
Headlamp+batteries- Petzl Zipka 2
Ultralight summit pack- GoLite Ion 8 *
Gun/ammo- .44 Magnum S&W 329PD Scandium frame, 31*
Holsters- Nylon, 1ea. for main pack and summit pack 2
Sunglasses 0.5
Sew/patch kit 1.75
Emergency kit- Flare, cord, signal mirror, whistle, etc. 7.75 *
First Aid Kit- Adventure Medical UL .9 10.75*
Leatherman-Squirt P4 1.75
Survival knife- Fallkniven WM1 4*
Dog tags 1
Kite 1.25
Handkerchief for sweat 0.25
Straps 0.5
Keys/spare set- 1 set car keys 0.25
Compass/maps 4
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  #2  
Old 04-24-2008, 08:38 PM
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Franimal Franimal is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
Backpack: Dana Designs Arclight
Sleeping Gear: Montbell SS Down Hugger #1
Shelter: Hilleberg Nallo 3
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Iowa
Posts: 41
This post is more out of curiosity rather than advice. I was wondering how necessary the headlamp is during the summer? Alaska is known for its "midnight sun" and most of Alaska gets at least 18 hours of light a day and the northern parts get 21-24 hours. Do you find it helpful to carry it around? Where in Alaska are you hiking?
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  #3  
Old 04-24-2008, 08:44 PM
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Holubar Holubar is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 19
I only use the headlamp in the fall. It starts to get dark enough to need it by then.
I hike in the Chugach and Talkeetna ranges mostly.

Last edited by Holubar : 04-24-2008 at 08:47 PM.
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  #4  
Old 04-27-2008, 10:19 AM
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cat cat is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Location: Alaska
Posts: 63
Hi fellow Alaskan!

We are Alaskans with 10-15# base weight, which isn't even ultralight. Lightweight works extremely well for us especially when we are climbing up in the Talkeetnas or Chugach.

Tarps might be actually safer with our bears due to visibility on both parts. But definitely have mosquito netting!! Some in our backpacking group use tarps with netting.

We certainly have a backpackers' paradise up here, don't we?
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  #5  
Old 05-01-2008, 05:37 AM
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Holubar Holubar is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 19
Cat,

Yes we do live in one of the greatest places in the world to backpack.

I respectfully disagree with your notion that tarps “might actually be safer”, as far as bears are concerned. But I must admit that I side with the James Gary Shelton’s of the world, as apposed to the Timothy Treadwell’s.

I have been in several vicious wind storms, one of which flattened a 4 pole dome and bent a pole. I really use a tent instead of a tarp out concern for the weather, {and possible mosquitoes}, more than anything else.

“Please keep Alaska quiet, don’t wear 'bear bells' ”
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  #6  
Old 05-02-2008, 10:33 AM
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cat cat is offline
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Join Date: May 2006
Location: Alaska
Posts: 63
Did you read the research study in ADN last month that said bear spray is the most effective deterrent of bears?

I still never carry bear spray, a gun, or bells in bear country.I sure have seen lots of bears but only had one close encounter with a brown bear which was while climbing Penguin Peak.The bear looked as nervous of us as we were of him.

I do use a bear vault solo or ursack when packing, depending on where I am. I am thrilled that Denali now has approved the bear vault solo, since it is so much lighter & less bulky that the garcias we used to pack into Denali with.
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  #7  
Old 05-03-2008, 07:36 AM
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mysigp226 mysigp226 is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by cat
Did you read the research study in ADN last month that said bear spray is the most effective deterrent of bears?

If I remember correctly that was primarily because those carrying/using a gun were not well trained to do so. When it comes to a novice gun user (eg: you have not taken a multi-day training class and do not shoot regularly) I'm sure bear spray _is_ more effective. But there is nobody who's going to tell me a properly trained gun owner is better off with bear spray. If that were the case marines would be carrying bear spray, not a firearm.
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  #8  
Old 05-03-2008, 04:26 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,954
[There are several interesting threads in the Backpackers Health & Safety forum here on PBF that deal with bears and devices (spray...) to be used as deterrents. That is a great place to discuss those issues.

The rest of Holubar's backpacking equipment choices are best suited for discussion in the Gear List forum.]

Holubar, how's the Isotope jacket been working for you in sustained rain (if you've used it that way)?

Reality
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  #9  
Old 05-03-2008, 09:31 PM
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Kutenay Kutenay is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 81
Interesting list and mine for all over western and northern Canada is quite similar. I am also in total agreement with the attitude/defence tool although mine latest just came today and is quite different.

I have a green Hilleberg Soulo enroute from bearriver in Utah and an OD- Integral Sildome coming in next weeks mail; I prefer a tarp/bivy in bear country, BUT, a bad July storm with 18" of snow and 50+ mph winds for 3-4 days tends to keep me a tent user.

The Integral Yukon is another new option that intrigues me.
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  #10  
Old 05-04-2008, 04:28 AM
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Holubar Holubar is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
Holubar, how's the Isotope jacket been working for you in sustained rain (if you've used it that way)?

The Isotope has not been used much since I bought it.
I hear there are some durability issues with it.
I hope it holds up.
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