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Gear List The Gear List forum is the place to post your actual backpacking gear list, and to read what others have in their packs. Don't forget to specify weight.


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  #1  
Old 04-09-2008, 11:08 PM
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mugs mugs is offline
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Backpack: ULA Circuit
Sleeping Gear: Hammock/TQ/UQ
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Thumbs up 5lb Gear List

I have been preparing for a bp seminar that I am going to give. This has forced me to actually get my gear a little more organized and also make a spread sheet for demonstration purposes. So I thought I would share my list and also seek ways to pare it down even more. It is catered to a normal (for me) 2-4 day trip. I know right off the bat if I took a 40f homemade quilt I could drop about 8 oz (226 gram) right there, but I have not made a qulit yet, hopefully I will in the near future. Also if I did not take a camera even more so. But I wanted to keep it real hence why I have included all items like fuel bottle and food bags (empty of course, but state there volume) However the soap, deet etc, are weighed full. And even though I have never used my rain skirt it still comes along, oh sure I could take a light flimsyer trash bag for it but I like the lawn and leaf bag better. Ok enough rambling for now. will add more as the thread goes along. Thanks for looking.



***Sorry about the layout but it does not transfer very well from excell to here ****


Gear List

Category Item Weight Grams Notes
Backpack
Zilch 1800 ci 122 Custom
Sub Total 122

Shelter
6x9 Cuben Tarp 116 Seam sealed
Ground Cloth 48 Polycryo
Ti Stakes 50 8 Stakes
Guy Line kit 4
Cuben Stuff Sack 4 Small Plus
SubTotal 222

Sleeping
WM HightLIte 512 35F
Cuben Stuff Sack 8 Med Plus
Pad/Pack Frame 270 MB UL.90
Sub Total 790

Cooking
Heiny 350 20 W/Lid
Stove 8
Windscreen 10
Fuel Bottle 20 4.5 oz
Matches 4 Paper Book
Spoon 18 Ti Long Handle
Cuben Food Bag 10 Large
Trash Bag 12 Heavy Duty 1/2 Gal Ziplok
Sub Total 102

Hydraton
Platy Bladder 102 3L W/Hose
Treatment 18 Klear water 10cc
Sub Total 120

Clothing
Wind Shirt 90 Montane Aero
Down Jacket 232 MB U.L. Inner
Combi Hat 34 Turtle Fur
Gloves 30 Poly Pro
Cuben Stuff Sack 6 Med
Sub Total 392

First Aid
First Aid Kit 58 In 4x7 AlokSak
Fire Starter 8 Mini Fire Steel
Tinder Quick 2 3 Tinders
Tooth Brush 16 Burts Bees Mini
Soap 6 3cc
DEET 6 3cc
Sunscreen 26 15cc
Cuben Stuff Sack 2 Small
Sub Total 124

MISC.
TP 16 10 BLU Shop Towls 5x5
Towl 8 Lite Load 11x11
Light 24 Watch Battery Type
Knife 36 Gerber Mini
30 Gal Trash Bag 52 Rain Skirt/Poncho
Info Lanyard 48 Cmpss, Thermo, Wstl
Camera 136 Olympus FE 240
Aloksak 6 For Camera 5x4
I.D. & CC Card 8
Cuben Wallet 1 For ID & CC Card
Sub Total 335

TOTAL 2207
2.2 Kilo
4.8 lbs
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  #2  
Old 04-10-2008, 05:29 AM
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Trudy Trudy is offline
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A very impressive weight for all the stuff you're taking!
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  #3  
Old 04-11-2008, 03:21 PM
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Wayback Wayback is offline
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I am certain that you put a lot of thought into coming up with a sub 5 pound (or sub 2.27 kilo, if you prefer) gear list. But, IMHO, the emphasis appears to have been on getting under 5 lbs rather than comfort, function, and safety. It seems more like a survival kit than a gear list. I imagine that you have the knowledge and skills that would let you survive in a dry, temperate climate with this list -- based on your listed gear, rain, humidity, and rough conditions (e.g., off-trail hiking or dense brush) are not factors that you had to consider in your gear selection.

I would suggest at least one spare pair of socks, and more durable/practical rainwear, among other things. If you are carrying about 0.1 fluid oz of soap, no Germ-X, and only 1/2 oz of TP for 4 days, I also suggest you trim your fingernails.

I would be interested is hearing how you are actually able to make do on a 4 day trip using only the gear on your list.

Last edited by Wayback : 04-11-2008 at 03:43 PM.
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  #4  
Old 04-12-2008, 03:01 PM
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cat cat is offline
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hey mugs!

I would be concerned with a bp seminar that did not include long john bottom & top layers.
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  #5  
Old 04-12-2008, 10:34 PM
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mugs mugs is offline
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Backpack: ULA Circuit
Sleeping Gear: Hammock/TQ/UQ
Shelter: Asym Diamond
 
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Posts: 442
Some thoughts to the ?

Wayback and Cat, I will try to answer and also give insight to the issues and questions raised.
First I must say that this is my list and my gear and yes I do actually use it and it is not just some made up hypothetical gear list that looks good. I use the gear, regularly and for me this is what works.

1. Yes a lot of thought and practice has gone into my gear. It has taken me about four years to get to this point. I did not intend for it to come in under 5 pounds it just did. Nor am I trying to tell everyone this is the way they are supposed to be. It is my goal and aim in the hopes that maybe someone can use it as a reference point to go off of and cater it to their own hiking style.

2. In regards to comfort, function, and safety.
Comfort, for me I am comfortable with what I have. In fact I have added some comforts back into the kit. I had to bite the bullet and purchase an air pad this year because my hips and back can not take a foamy any more. I also take a camera as to where I used not to. The clothing I take keeps me comfortable and warm very nicely. In fact the down jacket is another comfort item added this year, just because my bones can no longer take a silk weight capaline and wind shirt, so the down jacket replaced the capaline. I am comfortable not carrying a heavy pack!!!
Functionality, I seek ways to get more than one or two uses out of every piece of gear, in not looking at what I was not using, I noticed I never boil more than 12 oz of water so why am I taking a 24 oz Heiny can with me. So I cut one doe that holds 12 oz and allowed some boil room (which actually makes it 14 oz), this is just one example, but I have carries this philosophy into every aspect. I continually analyze what I am taking, what worked, what did not and make changes accordingly.
Safety. You are more prone to injury with a heavy pack that can throw you around and get your center of gravity off balance than a light one that is barley noticeable. I rely on my survival and ingenuity to get me through the rough spots, and believe me they have. My first aid kit though it may be light actually has a lot in it, probably some stuff that no one else has in theirs. I always rule on the side of caution and prepare for it as much as I can.

3. Weather conditions, Actually a lot of my hiking is done off trail via “throw a dart on the top and plot a route” I have weathered some serious storms in my tarp (for a complete and good discussions on tarps, listen to the PBF pod cast) When pitched in some very enclosed positions they can protect you just as well as a tent. In fact I have configured it to be completely enclosed at times (though be it for demonstration purposes, because I feel that it would then create a rains storm inside.) It does not matter the terrain, I hike it. I have hiked in bush so thick it takes an hour to get a half mile and mountain faces so steep that I had to use hand over hand to get to the top. And I tell you what I am glad I had on a light pack and not a heavy one when I was doing it, because I was dry camping that night as well. So yes I take into consideration and have hiked in adverse weather conditions with this kit. I know it is no “walk in the park” nor do I plan like it is. But through a level head one can overcome a lot of adversity.

Rainwear. I do not mind being wet, as long as I keep moving I can stay warm, also the Montane wind shirt does a decent job of spatter protection and I have yet to ever need to trash bag, yet I take it just in case. I just recently picked up a Tyvek jacket that weighs the same as the Montane so I am anxious to do a shower or sprinkler test with it, as well as take it on my next hike, maybe I will even get some rain to truly test it out.

4. Socks, TP, soap,
Socks, I have been blessed with tough feet and ankles. I wash them out nightly and let them air dry, and or I will do a river crossing with them and then take them off and hike w/o socks for a while in my shoes, and hang the socks outside my pack to dry. 4 days is my limit, if I am going on a trip longer than 4 days then yes and extra pair of socks and under wear come along. Then I do a nightly wash and swap.
TP. Nature first TP second thus only needing 2-4 squares a time. I know my body functions, and nothing happens until some time the 2nd day, which only leaves day 3 and the finish up trek of day 4. And again back to dual purpose. I can get another 4 squares out of my cut in half light load towel.
Soap, I use Dr. Bonner’s peppermint soap in a 3cc bottle. It is very “sudsy” and I only need 1 drop on my tooth brush to do the job and 4 drops at a time to wash my hands. Which I do after potty, before meals, and also to clean the mouth piece on my bladder after a fill up or when ever I feel that I need to clean my hands or wash whatever. So3 cc’s lasts me plenty. Again if it is going to be longer than 4 days I switch out to a 6 or10cc bottle depending on the trip duration.

5. Bp seminars and long johns. First the BP seminar is on how to “lighten up” I.E. instead of taking a 12 oz bottle of sun block with you, but actually only use 3 oz why not find a 3 oz bottle and transfer some into that and take it with you next time. Also how to get the most out of your gear, what to look for, ways to pair down, and multi purpose items etc, etc. The whole UL treatise is only discussed within the last 5 minutes or so and it is more or less a “and if you want to get as crazy and fanatical as me, here is the way I do it,” it is more for example sake then anything else. I will give out my gear list just so that they have a spring board or reference to go off of and create there own methodology. I want them to do what works for them and what they feel comfortable with. As I tell them “you can have all the lightweight gear in the world and still die because you do not know how to use it.”

So in closing, yes I do use all my gear listed, yes I know the limits of it and plan according to trip and number of days. I now how to, and regularly practice on how to, handle adverse weather. I will go out in the dead of winter or in a down poor of rain and sleet and try doing BP related things when I am cold, tired, freezing, etc, etc. But I do it in the safety of my back yard or the woods behind my house, so that when it hits the fan I know how to handle it. And believe me it has, and I am still here. This kit is for the typical 3 season backing trips, Early spring and winter get a way different list and some gear changes, especially in the clothing and shelter departments, the pack gets changed out as well. This style of hiking and the gear that is involved with it is not for everyone, and as Reality and Practical backpacking has put it numerous times, people need to do what is comfortable to them. For me this is what is comfortable. Too often people try to take there home environment into the wilderness, which is why there is such a huge market for over engineered, bomb proof gear and big stores to sell it in. In stead of us trying to adapt a little to the environment we feel as if we need to adapt it to our comfortable home environment. Which is why I feel that we as a hiking community need to be more concerned about advocating the outdoors then bantering over whether or not a person is going to survive on a minimalist gear selection., because the more people we can get evolved with wilderness exploration, the more advocacy within government and other entities we can have, so that we will actually have a place to hike in the first place. Hiker Dave taught me that on the PCT last year. He had a 60 pound pack and was happy as a lark with it. Why? Because he was out there and it did not matter who had the lightest pack it mattered that he and we were out there.

Shelter Weather Protection.

Example A: Buttoned down tarp for severe rain/weather protection & plenty room to sit up and cook. (***note*** this is not my normal configuration, but one I have used several time in bad weather)





Example B: A More Buttoned down & wind shedding configuration.





Example C: Complete enclosure, plenty of room to lay down, but would be very condensating inside, but may be good for some aplications.



Notice the side "vents" to try create a cross flow of air.

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  #6  
Old 04-13-2008, 05:46 AM
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markm markm is offline
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Hey Mugs,

I think what matters here is that you are confident that what you pack is suitable for your requirements being, comfort, safety and the enjoyment of it all.

Photos are great, so many different combinations for the one tarp is really amazing, wouldnt be too many weather conditions you couldnt cater for,

Cheers
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  #7  
Old 04-13-2008, 09:37 AM
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Mike_in_FHAZ Mike_in_FHAZ is offline
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Backpack: jam2
Sleeping Gear: 3 season TQ
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hey Mugs, great list. Thanks especially for the tarp images. Helps to see how others are managing bad weather situations.
Have you ever considered using a small umbrella, in place of a trash bag?
Have you ever tried using a hammock as a shelter, to comfort your "old bones"?
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  #8  
Old 04-13-2008, 11:39 AM
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Wayback Wayback is offline
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Mugs,
I appreciate your explanations. I envy the tough feet you have been blessed with. My concerns were, and are, that the limited clothing, sox, etc. would not be sufficient to have something dry to wear in camp, or for sleeping, in rainy, wet conditions. Other than my trips in the mountain west, most of my hiking has been in areas where nothing dries fast on its own, unless you have the luxury of letting it hang in the sun. Apparently that is not a problem where you are.

I use a tarp myself, so I agree with you that a tarp can be pitched to handle almost any weather conditions. The tarp you carry is certainly big enough to provide substantial shelter for one.

Thanks for sharing your list. I would imagine that your students will be challenged by your class.
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  #9  
Old 04-13-2008, 12:12 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
mugs mugs is offline
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Backpack: ULA Circuit
Sleeping Gear: Hammock/TQ/UQ
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Location: Washington
Posts: 442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_in_FHAZ
Have you ever considered using a small umbrella, in place of a trash bag?
Have you ever tried using a hammock as a shelter, to comfort your "old bones"?
I have thought of an umbrella but just have not bought it. One it is a little too heavy for my taste. I also use trekking poles so unless I could rig up a way to mount it on my shoulder and be hands free I don't really see myself using one.
As far as a hammock that is something I have considerd alot. But just have not put forth the funding for one, and again 3 pounds vs my 4.0 oz for my 6 x 9 cuben tarp, keeps me from taking the plundge.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayback
Mugs, My concerns were, and are, that the limited clothing, sox, etc. would not be sufficient to have something dry to wear in camp, or for sleeping, in rainy, wet conditions. Other than my trips in the mountain west, most of my hiking has been in areas where nothing dries fast on its own, unless you have the luxury of letting it hang in the sun. Apparently that is not a problem where you are.

I Hike and live in the Pacific North West where rain is no stranger to the us especially the west side. (I am blessed to be an esatern washington dweller where it is not an issue as much) But for the most part if things come to shove I have been ok with being completly stripped down in a bag, and yes had to put damp clothes on in the morning. But after about an hour or so things are somewhat dried out. Would I have liked a clean dry pair of socks to put on, you bet. But my feet don't really get cold unless it drops to about 20-25F and if I know I am going to out in those temps then I take an extra pair of sock with me. I hear what you are saying though, and maybe I should take that 40 grams into consideration. I guess I have just never felt the need for an extra pair. But now that my body is saying "hey dude, you not the hard core grunt that you used to be, and not jumping out of helicoptors any more" maybe I could allow for such extravagancies. I think for me it is because when I first started BPing again I had it all and a 60 pound pack for a weekend. And now I have swung the pedgilum way to the oposit direction. I am unique like that, very black and white, and no grey. It drives my wife nuts

Last edited by mugs : 04-13-2008 at 12:23 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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