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Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills The Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to ancient and/or primitive style bushcraft/wilderness skills (e.g. firecraft, foraging, natural material construction, modern/primitive tools, long-term wilderness survival,...).


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  #31  
Old 12-07-2013, 11:24 AM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
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Location: Sonoma County, CA
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Gave up on the Condor as it was just unredeemable. Re-purpose, re-use, recycle. Had to recycle. But kept the sheath.

Have turned to Morakniv, the Bushcraft and Companion Heavy Duty blades specifically (carbon steel). They really are spectacular blades and have replaced my Kabar Mark 1 in my kit. Light, strong, good steel, great edge-holding - I can't come up with any good reason not to carry the Bushcraft as my primary and the Companion as my secondary.

That being said I do also pack my Kabar Cutlass Machete for processing, clearing and other work best done with something other than a precision blade. Yes, the weight of the thing is significant but as I have moved toward a more self-reliance oriented approach to the boonies I don't pack in much food. In the mixed oak/chaparral/timber environment of our coastal National Forest/BLM lands this is entirely do-able as these ecosystems can supply basic needs.

No, I don't violate the rules. I carry both a fishing and a hunting license and am mindful of our collective and individual responsibilities/obligations to the natural world. But I am not about to relegate myself to being just a consumer of goods totally dependent upon markets for everything I experience in life. I'll buy a knife, yes, I'll own a lot of 'em, yes, and I'll be beholding to those who made 'em, but I will not limit my area of operation to established trails or my time spent in it to the days of food I can carry in. Yes, some may think that I may have lost my mind but they would be in error. You have to actually know what you can actually do and to know that you have to actually do it.

Whatever, the Mora Bushcraft is ideal for the boonies. In fact I bought 5 of 'em as Christmas gifts for the menfolk in our tribe. Actually I bought the Bushcraft with the ferro rod attached; though not entirely necessary it does put the blade and the fire means into one very convenient package.



Ben
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  #32  
Old 12-09-2013, 09:48 AM
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FirstRWD FirstRWD is offline
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Backpack: Detours 40L or Bike Panniers
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What was it you really disliked about the Rodan? To me and my inexperienced thoughts, the blade either needs to come back further toward the handle, or the blade needs to be a bit longer. Preferably the former option. The ratio of blade compared to the whole knife just doesn't look right. The handle seems like it could maybe use a little bit of redesign too, but I imagine it's fine for plenty of people as is.
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  #33  
Old 12-09-2013, 03:18 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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The designer of the Rodan apparently could not decide whether to make a blade or gardening tool. It's too light to be a gardening tool and too heavy for it's blade length to be a knife - overly large handle, blade way too big in both thickness and depth to be useful, way too heavy for its length to take advantage of its mass. Maybe as a chopper it could work, were you to bang the spine with a hammer or a rock or whatever but, since it is too short, it cannot fit that role well either. Which really doesn't matter I suppose as chopping with this or any other knife is a fool's errand anyway; there are plenty better tools for that task.

Bottom line, the thing makes no sense and so fits no purpose well. It is what it is, a designer's cartoon of a knife. Not practical.

Nice sheath, though, so I kept the sheath. I sent the blade out with the recyclables. I do not regret the decision.

And I won't be buying any more Condor products.



Ben
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  #34  
Old 12-17-2013, 06:59 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
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The Rodan Condor sheath works really well with my Kabar Mk1 Navy and I have ditched the uber-black-ops sheath supplied with the Kabar for the Rodan sheath, and have properly outfitted it with a small, soft Arkansas stone and a ferro rod-in-plastic-tube, both secured with ranger bands.

Yeah, I know. But that's what happens when you have too many knives to begin with and too much time on your hands. Sheesh. One minute I'm convinced that the Mora Bushcraft is the be-all and end-all, and it really is, and the next day I'm back to fiddling with some other blade trying to make it work better because I know it can.

Must be, maybe, could be some form of OCD or perhaps senility, I don't know.

Anyway, the quality of the Condor sheath and the utility it provides to the Mk1 encourages me to forgive the obscenity of the Rodan. Actually I'll wager that the cost of a custom sheath as good as the Rodan would be way higher than the price I paid for that knife, so I figure I'm even. Plus I like to think that somebody at the recycling center now has a half-way decent pry bar thanks to me.

We do what we can in service to others, intentional or otherwise.

Maybe Condor should just make sheaths. They really seem to know how to do that right.


Ben
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  #35  
Old 12-18-2013, 12:01 AM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
...maybe, could be some form of OCD or perhaps senility, I don't know.



Ben
Knife collecting as a form of senility? ...And here I always thought senility was something to be feared. Maybe I'll start looking forward to it!

I'll agree Condor does make a good sheath. It is amazing they give them away free with knifes sold at the price point they do. Glad you found some redeeming feature in that Rodan purchase.
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  #36  
Old 12-28-2013, 05:25 PM
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Wildfield Wildfield is offline
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I have only carried small pocket knives (Buck Cadet, Leatherman Squirt, etc), various lock blades (Buck 112, etc.) and various multi-tools (Leatherman Skeletool CX, etc.) for daily use and/or hiking/camping.

What do you think of this knife (SOG Seal Pup Elite) as a "starter/bushcraft" type of knife? I don't know anything about the brand (SOG), blade material (AUS-8 steel) or handle material (glass reinforced nylon). After reviewing a few knives online (SOG, Benchmade, Kershaw, Spyderco, and Buck) this model sort of caught my eye.



Thoughts and comments appreciated!

Thank you,
Darryl

Last edited by Wildfield : 12-28-2013 at 05:52 PM.
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  #37  
Old 12-29-2013, 12:46 AM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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Especially in the more expensive stuff, a lot of people seem to think highly of SOG. In my opinion, some of their inexpensive stuff is not designed very well.

I have a seal pup elite, in the 'bright" finish you show above. When I ordered mine from a well known internet clearance retailer, there were two variants advertized. One was of AUS 8, and the other was of a Chinese Cr steel. Thinking AUS 8 to be sufficient steel for light bushcraft use, I ordered that one. I used it on one trip, and found the edge simply didn't hold up. Edge retention was poor when just carving or cutting through small pieces of wood, and it quickly got waves and very small chips in it. The surface finish marred surprisingly easily. It feels and acts like a cheap knife blade.

When I got back, I wrote the vendor and asked if I had been shipped the wrong knife, mine did say "China" on it. The vendor said they contacted SOG and were assured it was AUS 8 despite the "China" stamp. I don't believe it. I think mine's a lemon in the cheaper steel from China. I won't be using it again, due primarily to the blade quality issue.

(I work in the pet industry, and have often seen problems with wrong or unapproved ingredients slipping into products from vendors who do business with chinese suppliers, resulting in recalls. Everyone who has a dog or cat has heard of this. Perhaps unapproved substitutions could happen with knife makers who use steel sourced from China, too? Maybe my knife isn't a representative sample of the design.)

Steel issues aside, I did like the overall size and weight of the seal pup elite, and I liked the feel of the handle when I held it. I want to like this knife. But when I used it, I liked the handle less. I like the feel of my bushlore's handle better, but that could just be personal preference. There are lots of people on the internet who say they use and love this knife in AUS 8 for camp and bushcraft, so it might be a good starter knife if it's really got good steel. But for me, I'm done with it. Especially since mine isn't good steel.
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  #38  
Old 12-29-2013, 01:31 PM
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Wildfield Wildfield is offline
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Thank GGervin...appreciate your feedback. Disappointed to hear about the quality of the blade but relieved to hear this before I made the purchase.

I'm not familiar with the various blade materials. I think I should spend some time researching blade materials before doing more research on the knives themselves.

Thanks again for the feedback!
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  #39  
Old 12-29-2013, 10:19 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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i'm kind of glad i never picked up the SOG knives i was looking at.
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  #40  
Old 12-30-2013, 02:05 AM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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Wouldn't want to imply all SOGs are trouble. I suspect the Seal Team Elite is the apex of the line, and the Fusion Fixation (not the Seal Pup Elite) is the nadir, based on personal inspection.

I think the Seal Pup Elite was sourced from China, Japan, and - yikes, I've forgotten the third source, Taiwan maybe?. Only the China ones with the Cr steel have recieved a bad rep on the internet - and that's the one I think I have. The others have gotten good to very good reviews.

As a final musing, I'll mention I got mine for - what was it? $15.00 I think? Before shipping. On clearance. There is the remote possibility you get what you pay for in knives, and that just might include clearance knives...

Last edited by GGervin : 12-30-2013 at 02:16 AM.
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