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Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills The Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to ancient and/or primitive style bushcraft/wilderness skills (e.g. firecraft, foraging, natural material construction, modern/primitive tools, long-term wilderness survival,...).


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  #11  
Old 04-01-2010, 08:43 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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In my view the Kabar standard fighting knife is about as good as it needs to get. Good steel, ample grip, affordable, anything larger might as well be a gun. But not a 357 or 45. No.

Were I wandering around in Alaska pretending not to be food I would select a short lever gun in 450 or 444 Marlin, maybe 45/70; Marlin Guide gun or similar.

By the way, you know how to identify the winner in a knife fight?

He's the guy who dies last.

Ben
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  #12  
Old 04-02-2010, 11:02 AM
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Wayback Wayback is offline
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Rock, knife, big stick, pistol, sharp pencil, hatchet, rope, e-tool, tent stake, Bic lighter, boot, rifle, hiking poles, saw, DEET, walking stick, head. There are certainly others. All have some utility as tools and as weapons. I am likely to have more than one of these handy when I am out of the house. My favorite is whatever I have with me, at the time I need it, that will get the job done and leave me to tell war stories later. The last tool listed is most important.
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  #13  
Old 04-02-2010, 11:50 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
But not a 357 or 45. No.

do elaborate on why not(always interesting to read other people's rationalizations behind what they would carry in that situation).
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  #14  
Old 04-02-2010, 09:35 PM
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Tipiwalter Tipiwalter is offline
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I don't know where you guys camp or backpack, maybe in North Korea or Somalia, but having a weapon or a hatchet that can pierce kevlar is not yet needed in my neck of the woods. I guess when the time comes to defend the land against armed invaders, I'd go with something I can pull off the invaders and use their ammo, etc etc. Maybe it'll be an AK-47, maybe a M79, we'll just have to see. As of yet the mountains of NC and TN are not in total war. Grizzlies? Very few grizzlies in the lower 48, very few.

In the meantime, what tool have I found to be the best for all around survival? Don't laugh: the humble bowsaw. A bowsaw can build wigwams with saplings and put up a tipi using whatever trees are available, I used poplars and locust. A drawknife isn't even needed. A bowsaw can provide firewood in precise lengths and can fell moderately sized trees and cut them up. With just a bowsaw and some cordage you can have a 18 foot diameter tipi up in a couple days.

Beyond the bowsaw, a woodstove is vital for long term living out, both for winter warmth and cooking. Love the woodstove.
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  #15  
Old 04-02-2010, 10:36 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tipiwalter
A bowsaw can build wigwams with saplings and put up a tipi using whatever trees are available, I used poplars and locust.
It's be nice to see a photo of your tool/bow-saw in action. Have a pic handy?

Reality
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  #16  
Old 04-03-2010, 04:48 PM
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SSDD SSDD is offline
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Benwaller, I agree and I love my old kabar as it has seen years of use and abuse and still going strong.

But for bushcraft type stuff I like my hawk as in IMO it's more versatile than a knife.
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  #17  
Old 04-03-2010, 08:32 PM
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etowah etowah is offline
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My hands. Multi purpose, always with me and very dependable in all situations.
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  #18  
Old 04-04-2010, 07:32 AM
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Tipiwalter Tipiwalter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
It's be nice to see a photo of your tool/bow-saw in action. Have a pic handy?

Reality

I don't have an actual picture of handling a bowsaw, but I have the results of what a bowsaw can do. Everything you see, the wood piles, the tipi, was done with a bowsaw.


Last edited by Tipiwalter : 04-04-2010 at 07:42 AM. Reason: photo upgrade
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  #19  
Old 04-06-2010, 04:55 PM
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olpaddy olpaddy is offline
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In my eclectic opinion, the best weapon/tool a person can have is two fold. One, the mind with its storehouse of knowledge (hopefully). Two, the ability to use such knowledge.

My favorite tool is a knife ~ my preference is a knife with a quality carbon steel blade rather than stainless. It is just a matter of preference. The blade length, again my personal preference is more than 4 inches but less than 5 inches. It's style resembles a DeWeese pattern. Again it is my personal choice.

Grace unto ye.
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  #20  
Old 04-09-2010, 05:53 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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I should add: with regard my tools/weapons, I'm not very fond of throwing my tools or weapons away from me. Certainly if I had to, but I'm not likely to pre-plan for that.

Reality
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