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Backcountry Kitchen The Backcountry Kitchen forum is for the discussion of food and cooking gear related topics for backpacking trips (e.g. menus, recipes, stoves, fuel...).


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  #1  
Old 12-12-2013, 03:24 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Stainless Steel Bottles and Boiling Water

If you use a stainless steel bottle (single wall) to boil water in for any backcountry trips, please share which bottle and any related particulars.

Thanks for your participation.

Reality
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  #2  
Old 12-16-2013, 07:42 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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I've used a 750 ml Subzero stainless steel water bottle in the fire to boil water and cook, on two separate overnight "survival" trips. It worked really well, as the height allowed it to set on the edge of the fire, rather than on the coals, and the flame's radiant heat brought it to a boil pretty fast. Much easier than balancing a pot on rocks, or setting it on the coals. A couple sticks served to lift it out, using the lip above the threaded neck. I also had a smaller, 500 ml bottle handy to pour the boiled water into for cooling, so I could put more on to boil or cook with. These were the only cooking/drinking/eating utensils I had with me.

I usually carry a plastic water bottle for weight savings, on a normal backpacking trip, but the practical uses and reliability of this bottle has earned it a place in my heart. On other threads that discuss what one would take on an extended trip, I recall saying I would definitely plan to have one of these along.
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  #3  
Old 12-16-2013, 08:00 PM
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I enjoy reading about your trips, richwads.

I'm wondering about your thoughts on a couple of bottle features. I tend to prefer the cap threads to be on the outside of the neck - mostly for ease of keeping clean. Also, a wide mouth seems to be more useful. Are either of these features of any benefit for you?

Reality
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Old 12-18-2013, 04:08 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
I enjoy reading about your trips, richwads.

I'm wondering about your thoughts on a couple of bottle features. I tend to prefer the cap threads to be on the outside of the neck - mostly for ease of keeping clean. Also, a wide mouth seems to be more useful. Are either of these features of any benefit for you?

Reality
I'm not familiar with threads on the outside of the neck, but I do appreciate the trend of stamping larger threads into the neck (you can see the threads on the outside, though the cap fits INSIDE the neck), rather than the finer machined threads used in the past (like for fuel bottles), for the same reason. Also, the neck opening is a tad bit wider. The really wide mouth version would be better for cooking, I agree, but haven't acquired one. Mine is a cheap drugstore version. Do you have any particular models in mind, or have used?
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Old 12-18-2013, 04:32 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
I'm not familiar with threads on the outside of the neck, but I do appreciate the trend of stamping larger threads into the neck (you can see the threads on the outside, though the cap fits INSIDE the neck), rather than the finer machined threads used in the past (like for fuel bottles), for the same reason.

Yeah, larger threads can be quite helpful. They may be easier to clean too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
Do you have any particular models in mind, or have used?

The Laken bottles have external threads. But, as I recall, those are aluminum.

I believe the popular Klean Kanteen Wide Mouth Bottle with Stainless Loop Cap has internal threads. By the way, they have an updated Stainless Flip D-Ring Wide cap that is interesting.

I have a couple other bottles here and plan to look into others. I'll keep you posted if anything interesting arises.

Reality
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  #6  
Old 12-23-2013, 12:50 PM
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dustin dustin is offline
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I tried a boil test on a free stainless bottle I'd gotten at work, while testing some sierra cups. The bottle diameter was smaller than the hexagon stove opening, so I suspended it with stakes. The flames wrapped up the side sort of like a Caldera cone, so the bottle boiled faster than anything else that day.

This bottle walls are really thin and light, but the opening is fairly wide and it has a little silicone band near the top. I thought maybe this would be a cool option. Besides, being free I won't cry if I warp it. The silicone band is really thin and didn't help much. I burned my fingers getting it off the stove. Might be workable if I squeezed some thicker free silicone wristbands onto it.

The only disadvantages I see (besides the usual instability of a tall container) are that you'd lose the ability to store stuff inside your cookware and since this is a promotional item, upgraded caps or replacement are not going to happen.
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Old 12-23-2013, 01:56 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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For those desiring to hang a stainless bottle over a fire, a fish mouth spreader makes a good bail. It will spread and hold inside the bottle up under the interior neck/shoulders of the bottle.

Reality
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