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Wilderness Photography The Wilderness Photography forum is for the discussion of photography (videography) gear, experience, and technique as it directly relates to wilderness photography. PBF members may also post self-owned photos that have been uploaded to the PB Gallery or as post attachments. Offsite links and offsite photos are prohibited. Please see ("sticky") instructional post located at top of threads.


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  #11  
Old 04-09-2008, 06:07 PM
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2Questions 2Questions is offline
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These owls have been using this nest evidently for several years. I found them last year and they had 4 owlets. This year ... just two. Mom often perches beside the nest, while dad hasn't been seen for awhile. I've read they may come back 8-10 years during breeding season. Owls don't build nests, they "acquire" one. I've enjoyed watching them.
2Q
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  #12  
Old 04-09-2008, 10:35 PM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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Owls are my favorite bird by far. I had the opportunity to spot a snowy owl in SW Ohio several years ago when I was in college. Awesome bird. Unfortunately, I rarely ever see them.

I saw a great horned in a canyon in Utah awhile back. It was on the ground as though it had caught something. I tried snapping a pic and it took off before the shutter closed. Just a blur. That same summer I saw a barn owl in the road. We swore it was dead (drove right over the top of it!), and since we were keeping track of owls that summer for the USFS, we were going to move it to the side of the road. Imagine our surprise when we got out of the truck when the bird hopped up onto its feet and flew away. I'm not kidding it was laying in the street as though it was dead in Hanksville, UT at about 1:30am. There was a mutilated rabbit left behind when the bird flew off.

My best guess is that the owl was scavenging a roadkill rabbit when someone either hit and stunned the owl, or made it freak out and pass out. It came to when my buddies and I got out of the truck to scoop it up with a shovel.

I do seem to find the barred owls wherever I end up camping because they wake me up in the wee am hours hooting away. Can't say I've ever seen one, though, as it's always still dark.
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  #13  
Old 04-10-2008, 03:59 PM
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Remnant Remnant is offline
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At the risk of getting moderated myself,
Owls are one of my favorite birds as well...when I was younger, we were on
our way to an Amish settlement to get a wagon wheel fixed, and came
across a Barred Owl that had gotten caught in a barbed-wire fence. He'd
evidently hit his "elbows" trying to fly through and gotten flipped over the strand.
We happened to have a cardboard box in the family truckster along
with some bath-towels (don't ask me why-I was a kid and wasn't in charge
of packing duties at the time) So my Dad walked down to the fence with a
towel, and wrapped the owl up in it, then had me hold the wires apart enough
to where he could "un-flip" the owl and untangle it from the barbed wire.
That was one pissed owl!
We put him in the cardboard box, went on up to the Amish settlement, fixed
our wheel, then let the owl loose in our horse barn.
That owl stayed for at least 2 years, and was my buddy when I had to go
down to the barn to feed the horses
(I was around ten, had to do this before I got on the bus for school, so it was
dark in that barn, and having that owl up in the rafters kinda made me feel like I
had a better set of eyes to look
for "monsters")
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  #14  
Old 04-18-2008, 06:25 AM
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Questtrek Questtrek is offline
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Very interesting ... I never knew that about owl pellets.
Very cool pictures
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  #15  
Old 05-21-2008, 01:20 PM
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2Questions 2Questions is offline
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Here's the latest shot of the owl fledge...and look what's been dogging him. This squirrel was not in the least worried about the owl. He crawled up the tree, noticed the squirrel, got this close and continued to ascend to the upper branches.
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  #16  
Old 05-29-2008, 05:07 PM
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Remnant Remnant is offline
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Great Shot! The owlet looks almost ashamed...thanks for sharing!
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  #17  
Old 07-19-2008, 10:54 AM
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Condor Condor is offline
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That is an awesome shot. Must have been great to watch!
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  #18  
Old 01-05-2009, 10:43 PM
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writinginct writinginct is offline
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Those are simply awesome shots. I love owls. And its neat that you were able to see them from one year to the next.

That last picture should be made into a kid's cartoon "Squirrels are friends, not food."
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