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Wilderness Photography The Wilderness Photography forum is for the discussion of photography (videography) gear, experience, and technique as it directly relates to wilderness photography. PBF members may also post self-owned photos that have been uploaded to the PB Gallery or as post attachments. Offsite links and offsite photos are prohibited. Please see ("sticky") instructional post located at top of threads.


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  #1  
Old 02-15-2008, 11:11 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Ultralight Camera Stabilizer / Monopod (< 1 oz)

[Note: I'm not able to post a photo at this time, but I'll try to do so soon - maybe even of my StikPod]

For those of you who want a cheap, lightweight way to achieve image stabilization, here's an easy method using common backpacking items (and a bolt).

Items Needed
  • One small 1/4" bolt (course threads)
  • Section of UL guyline (about your height)
  • Shelter stake (or twig...)
Instructions
  1. Tie one end of line to bolt shaft near head.
  2. Tie other end of line to stake.
Usage

Simply screw the bolt into your camera's tripod threads. Then place your foot on the stake at the other end of the line. Pull the line taut by bringing the camera up to your eye level. Take your photo. [You can freely pivet with this method of stabilization.]

Other than the very light bolt, you're likely to already have line and a stake (or similar) on hand. Give it a try. It works very well and stows in little space.

Reality

P.S. I'm aware of other methods - e.g. using trekking pole (with something like my like my StikPod™) and lightweight tripods. This is just another simple method that is extremely light.
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  #2  
Old 02-15-2008, 03:43 PM
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tpeterson1959 tpeterson1959 is offline
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Good idea! I like it.
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  #3  
Old 02-15-2008, 05:14 PM
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Remnant Remnant is offline
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Here's a way to make it lighter...forego the stake and make a loop that will fit
around your boot/shoe where the stake would be...this is an old trick that 35mm users have used for some time now, I should have mentioned it myself, but the old way of doing it was using thin chain of some sort, not something that would be carried by a BP'er...good find Reality!
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  #4  
Old 02-15-2008, 05:52 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Remnant
Here's a way to make it lighter...forego the stake and make a loop that will fit around your boot/shoe where the stake would be...

That's certainly an option. Here's my thoughts on it though...

1). The stake is already being carried, so there is no additional weight.

2). I, personally, would not put a loop around my foot that is attached to my camera. With the stake or twig method, if I stumble, the line is free and not yanking my camera from my hands.

But some may prefer looping the line/camera to their foot.

Reality
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  #5  
Old 02-15-2008, 08:12 PM
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big_load big_load is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
I, personally, would not put a loop around my foot that is attached to my camera.

Yeah, that sounds like the beginning of a sad story, the kind your friends will laugh about for years.

Your method sounds interesting, though. I'll give it try if I can remember to look for a bolt.
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  #6  
Old 02-15-2008, 08:17 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big_load
I'll give it try if I can remember to look for a bolt.

You may be able to strip it from something you already have. If not, you know where to go. The local hardware or home improvement store should have one.

It does a nice job of stabilizing the shot. And, as previosly mentioned, you probably already have the line and stake with you. The bolt can double as an emergency fishing sinker too.

Reality
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  #7  
Old 02-19-2008, 06:58 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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I've attached a photo showing this setup. There are lighter bolts available, but this one will do at 0.25 oz.

The total weight is 0.50 oz.

By the way, if you're already carrying a gorillapod or an ultrapod, you can simply tie on to that - if you wish to get the camera up to pivot around.

Reality
Attached Images
File Type: jpg PracticalBackpacking_UL-Image-Stabilization.jpg (377.9 KB, 65 views)
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  #8  
Old 03-22-2008, 10:17 AM
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Buffaloscout Buffaloscout is offline
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Any bolt will work, but I recommend using an eye-bolt. The line can be fastened to it more securely.

'scout
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  #9  
Old 03-22-2008, 10:55 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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I like the idea of an eye-bolt. I have one that I used for this one time, but it goes to something else (so I put it back), and I haven't been able to find any more like it with the course (appropriate) threading (locally).

However, there's absolutely no difference in tying a secure knot to either one (with regard to it coming off). My simple knot is not going to be pulled or yanked off in any way.

Thanks for the input.

Reality
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  #10  
Old 03-23-2008, 11:26 AM
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Mataharihiker Mataharihiker is offline
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I bought a camera with image stabilization ...that said, the bolt idea is cool...
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