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Wilderness Photography The Wilderness Photography forum is for the discussion of photography (videography) gear, experience, and technique as it directly relates to wilderness photography. PBF members may also post self-owned photos that have been uploaded to the PB Gallery or as post attachments. Offsite links and offsite photos are prohibited. Please see ("sticky") instructional post located at top of threads.


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  #1  
Old 01-01-2008, 05:00 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Backpacking Llamas

I came upon these llamas (and their human companion - not shown) while hiking on the shoulder of Mt. Jefferson in Oregon.



Reality
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  #2  
Old 01-06-2008, 12:05 PM
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Remnant Remnant is offline
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How did they react to you hiking past them? I'm assuming that you probably spent some time talking with the human companion and the llama's got used to your presence...prolly a lot easier to deal with than horses, as llamas have been used as pack animals in the New World longer than horses have. But I don't know a thing about llamas and their demeanor other than sometimes seeing them in pastures in MO.
Neat that somebody's out there hiking with them! Never could understand why (unless you had a fetish) somebody would raise them and not -use- them.
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Old 01-06-2008, 12:32 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Remnant
How did they react to you hiking past them?

They were calm. I did take it easy around them. I didn't want to spook them in any way.

The guy had them up on Mt. Jefferson in an alpine meadow camping for one week. There was a violent thunderstorm the night before this, but he said they all did well.

As I recall, he said the llamas were young. There were 4 of them with packs on, and he had a pack too. I'm sure he was comfortable, but there wasn't any patio furniture hanging off of any of them (like on the backpackers I saw coming in that day).

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Old 01-07-2008, 11:58 AM
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Rambler Rambler is offline
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My sister and brother-in-law have used llamas for several summers hiking in the Wind River Range out of Lander, WY. Here is what they report: Llamas can carry up to 80 pounds. (My sister has never used them to carry that much) The llamas are easy to hike with. They follow along behind on a tether. When the hiker stops, they stop. Llamas are not at all friendly like a dog or horse. They do not want to be patted, or hang around your tent looking for affection. They spit, so watch it! At night they will keep other animals away. They are hobbled at night to keep them near. They only need about a handful of grain a day, and they carry the food. I assume they supplement their diet by grazing. My sister has always been great around animals, she has raised chickens, pigs, and horses, but my brother-in-law has little fondness for domestic animals, so if the llamas were at all difficult he would be the last to use them. My sister blew out a knee doing sports, so not having to carry a heavy pack makes backpacking an option. She loves being outdoors, fly fishing and away from people. She and my brother-in-law live in Maine and throughly enjoy using the llamas in the west. (They are headed back again next summer)
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Old 01-11-2008, 09:06 AM
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Hanger Hanger is offline
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There are a few llama farms in Knoxville, and they are used in Great Smoky Mountain National Park by the rangers to move supplies up to Mt. Leconte. I have yet to see one though.
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Old 01-12-2008, 10:46 AM
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Mouldy Mouldy is offline
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I saw the Forest Service in the Winds using them. They were carrying fishing nets ( the big ones to do surveys) and other random stuff. For two fisheries guys, they had 8 llamas! I thought it was a bit of overkill but who knows how much stuff they needed. Also saw a man and woman with a couple of them out there. Could have been have been Rambler's sister! I've never used them but i am an experience horse packer. The handful of grain sounds pleasing compared to the 10 or so pounds a horse or mule needs a day.
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Old 01-15-2008, 10:41 PM
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JimKirk JimKirk is offline
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reality, i think a great podcast would be with a llama or goat packer talking about the basics of owning and hiking with these animals.
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Old 01-16-2008, 03:56 PM
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Remnant Remnant is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimKirk
reality, i think a great podcast would be with a llama or goat packer talking about the basics of owning and hiking with these animals.

That does sound like it might make an interesting podcast or two! If you can find dedicated/enthusiastic packers...
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  #9  
Old 01-19-2008, 03:36 AM
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Dogwood Dogwood is offline
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LLLLLammmas are smaller, lighter and eat less than horses. They have padded feet. Because of these factors they create less trail erosion. They are mainly used as pack animals, but I've heard of small children riding them occasionally. They make great watchdogs(watch animals?). In Patagonia their relatives, Alpacas, are sometimes used around flocks to alert of predators. If they don't like U they will spit at U, but I've never had a problem. I've seen them on trails in Cal. and in Great Smokey Mnts. NP. I've always wanted to get a pic of the llama trains going behind Grotto Falls while on their way up to resupply the cabins on top of Mt. LeConte.
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