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Bikepacking The Bikebacking forum is for discussion that relates directly to bikepacking (also known as bicycle camping). Subject matter should involve the backpacking/camping/bike gear and trip planning as it relates to mountain biking and bicycle touring.


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  #21  
Old 10-14-2009, 03:31 PM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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Backpack: Osprey Atmos 50
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Join Date: Mar 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
it is strange, as solid fuel stoves don't have that whole, you know, EXPLOSION thing going for them... i've seen what happens if a liquid fueled stove should be tipped, bumped, or shifted wrong... 'fwoosh' comes to mind. especially alcohol stoves.

solid fuel burning stove of any sort, what do you get if you knock it over? a few sparks, a pile of burning coals that's easy to put out(as opposed to liquid fuels, which tend to spread when you try to use water on them, and continue to burn if you throw dirt/ash on them...) with water or dirt.

huh.

thinking about it that way makes it seem pretty strange...

Yep, I live in an area that gets burn bans in summer, and any liquid or gas fuel stove is okay, but if it burns solids, no go. Even charcoal grills are out. Never seen a spark thrown from one of those, aside from the fireball that occasionally results when too much lighter fluid is used.
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  #22  
Old 10-26-2009, 02:21 PM
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0nelove 0nelove is offline
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Just thought I'd chime in late, and agree with the others who recomend a multi/white gas stove.

I've got an Optimus Nova that I've been very happy with. The thing about cooking on a bike tour is that (generally) you have more re-supply stops, so you can do a little more involved cooking then on a long backpacking trip.

Plus the added weight is a much smaller percentage of what you're carrying, so it's not nearly as noticeable to carry something heavier as it is with backpacking.
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  #23  
Old 01-13-2010, 10:53 PM
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Debkirk Debkirk is offline
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Backpack: Camelback HAWG
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Hey Life,
We are ultralight bikepackers and our research led us to a little Brunton stove and a Snowpeak pot and cup set. The stove and the fuel fit nicely in the pot. I boils &, heats up thing well. Also, anything cooks in aluminum foil; baking potatoes is my favorite. A little squeeze bottle of olive oil is kinda handy.
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  #24  
Old 01-28-2011, 10:57 AM
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Silas Silas is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lifeontwowheels
Thanks for the replies. I'm looking at both and weighing the advantages and disadvantages.

For white gas stoves, I'm liking some of the Optimus/Primus variants that seem to be getting good reviews. Might look at SVEA as well, since I'm finding new stoves online at good prices.

Really liking the Caldera set up for alcohol-especially the Ti-Tri which allows wood burning.

I have a (Snowpeak, I believe) canister stove lying around here somewhere in my old scout gear. Only problem I have read about these is the relative lack of fuel availability once you hit the American Heartland. If I can find it, I may look at some of the options of mailing fuel and taking a small tea-light alcohol/esbit for back up.

I have the Optimus Nova plus, the Primus Omnifuel, and the SVEA. I use them all. (I motorcycle camp, but feel my comments still relevant)
I like the Nova for its extreme adjustability. I use the Optimus heat exchange pot set they offer. Very durable, excellent heat dispersion.
I also like the Primus. I currently use it with the canister because it's super quick. It simmers pretty well...not as good as the Optimus.

I just started using the SVEA 123's. Nostalgia, shiny brass antiquey! And they cook great! Try to get an old 123, not the 123R. Simmers/cooks better.
Another good choice, especially for the bike, is the old Optimus 8R. I carry those too. Self contained, quick, and simmers pretty well.
Fuel is already in the tanks of the 123 and the 8R. Both burn about an hour on a tank.
The SVEA and 8R require a brief learning curve, but are 100% reliable. The others are much quicker.
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  #25  
Old 03-05-2011, 06:11 PM
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fripphead fripphead is offline
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Very Late opinion

HI All:
Thanks for the answers to this, as I am, too looking into replacing a Coleman Peak 1 circa 1979. Only the weight of a small boxcar- and equally as reliable and durable.
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  #26  
Old 03-06-2011, 02:38 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fripphead
HI All:
Thanks for the answers to this, as I am, too looking into replacing a Coleman Peak 1 circa 1979. Only the weight of a small boxcar- and equally as reliable and durable.

handy to have if barbarians ever lay siege to your camp... you can drop it on them .

the new coleman stoves are pretty light, compared to back then.
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