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Backcountry Kitchen The Backcountry Kitchen forum is for the discussion of food and cooking gear related topics for backpacking trips (e.g. menus, recipes, stoves, fuel...).


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  #1  
Old 04-27-2012, 01:52 PM
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aberrant aberrant is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2012
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Quinoa Recipes

Hey, last night my wife and I made a chinese food style dish using Quinoa, an interesting grain that is new to us.

Quinoa has a lot of protein, fiber, iron, and magnesium for a grain. Its smaller (and therefore faster cooking) than rice.

We were thinking it would be an excellent ingredient to a backpacking dinner so I came here wondering what recipes existed for it.

Anyone?
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  #2  
Old 04-29-2012, 08:40 AM
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HighMiler HighMiler is offline
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Backpack: Trailwise External-Frame with various bags
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The only real issue I have with cooking quinoa out backpacking, in my experience, is the cooking time. Same with most whole grains.

My basic recipe, and the one we use at home, is two-to-one, water-to-quinoa, bring to boil and then simmer about 15 minutes until grain is clear. Add spices, to taste at start, if desired, or toss with some butter after cooking.

Out on the trail, I do the 2-to-one measure, then boil for five minutes, and set aside covered for 15 minutes in my "cozy." Like couscous.

Even the short method uses a bit more fuel than I like to burn. "Bringing to boil" and "Boiling for five minutes" involve different fuel expenditures.

However, I have dumped in some extra h2o along with a dried soup mix, dried 'shrooms, or other goodies at the start and ended up with a casserole-type main dish. The fuel expenditure seems thereby more justified.

If there is a campfire available, simmering time is not an issue.

Almost forgot: If you search "quinoa recipes" there are sites dedicated to the grain.
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Old 04-29-2012, 10:29 AM
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Wilder Wilder is offline
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You can cook and dehydrate it at home.

Then, at camp, FBC it with an equal amount of hot water.
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Old 05-15-2012, 11:23 AM
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Mountaineerbass Mountaineerbass is offline
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I'm simple, a pouch of chicken, and a couple handfulls of freeze dried mixed veggies, chicken boullion, and I use just a tad more water then 2-1, and I have what we call "mush" similiar to chicken noodle soup. As the name implies it is "mushy", but very filling.

Actually I make two variations, both with "Just Tomatoes" Brand mixed veggies. One variation has "Just Hot Veggies" and the other has "Just Veggies" and I add Rosemary and Lemon (either powder or concentrate).

Quinoa does use more fuel if you don't dehydrate first, but anymore. I've all but ditched the alcohol stove. When I backpack with friends or family we split the Brunton Optimus, one takes the white gas bottle, and one takes the stove. It's still light. Anymore I worry less about the weight of my food. I figure I'm out there to enjoy myself, so I should enjoy my food.
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