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The Trailhead - General Backpacking Discussion The Trailhead General Discussion forum is for backpackers to discuss non-gear related wilderness backpacking issues (e.g. technique, LNT, hiking partner wanted, trip planning...) that are not covered in other PB forums.


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  #1  
Old 03-21-2010, 06:02 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Things to Do While Pumping (Filtering) Water

Over the years I've heard and read comments from others who've expressed their discomfort and/or dislike with pumping drinking water (using their pump-filter). [And pumping water ranks high on the least enjoyed chore list ...]

The following are some things to do that may or may not make the experience more enjoyable. I'm fully aware that there are some who do not like to pump water who have considered and/or practiced some of the following. However, what we share in this thread may be of use to some backpackers - to overcome a little of their displeasure associated with pumping drinking water.
  • Rest/soak your feet
  • Eat a snack (alternate pumping food into your mouth and water into container)
  • Mediate, pray, or think happy thoughts (or whatever...)
  • Study a map (placed off to the side)
  • Sing a song or chant your favorite mantra (being considerate of others around you)
  • Listen to music (...)
  • Focus your senses on the wild around you
  • Consider it a workout for your hands and forearms (...). Remember to switch hands.
  • Mentally ponder/plan the journey (section) that lies before you
  • [Have someone else pump the water, while you rest ]
These are just a few ideas. Feel free to share any of your own, and/or comment on how you've put some of them into action while pumping water.

Reality

P.S. This thread is not for the discussion of the types (e.g. gravity) or models of filters/pumps - rather,
specifically, what (activities) to do while using pump-filters.
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  #2  
Old 03-21-2010, 07:06 PM
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Browtine Browtine is offline
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I like to take someone along whose either young or inexperienced enough to still think pumping water is fun!

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  #3  
Old 03-21-2010, 07:25 PM
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big_load big_load is offline
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I do the lamest possible thing: count strokes. I don't allow myself to switch pumping arms until I've done whatever I consider to be enough at the moment. I keep raising the limit if I can. I pump as much as 9L when I hit water, so it can take a while.
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Old 03-21-2010, 07:26 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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It's nice that you have a little helper along who enjoys filtering.

Pumping water has been been just part of the total experience for me. Over the decades, experience has increased the pleasure and decreased the unpleasant things for me.

I'm so grateful for any time that I can spend in the wild, so I have little to complain about.

It's completely understandable that there are some who are unable to pump and/or simply do not like to do it. It's my hope that this thread will be of some help for those who choose to pump - as a direct result of people sharing actual things to do while pumping.

Big_load, that's a good one: counting. It seems simple but it's actually a very good method (that works for many with a variety of things).

Reality
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  #5  
Old 03-22-2010, 08:06 AM
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Mountaineerbass Mountaineerbass is offline
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I'll go with about half of your suggestions!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
Rest/soak your feet
think happy thoughts
Study a map (placed off to the side)
Sing a song or chant your favorite mantra (being considerate of others around you)
Focus your senses on the wild around you
Mentally ponder/plan the journey (section) that lies before you
Have someone else pump the water, while you rest

I'll also add shoot the bull, and sometimes even have lunch.

I alway's look at it as a chance to rest and regroup. What's better then sitting beside a nice stream and taking everything in and recharging for a couple minutes.
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  #6  
Old 03-22-2010, 02:10 PM
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Haclil Haclil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
Focus your senses on the wild around you

When I sit pumping I do it as smoothly and methodically as I can until I'm done. Usually it's a peaceful time because I usually work this in after a late dinner and before bed.

Rather than focusing my mind I just try to empty it of thoughts and "be present" to what I'm doing as well as the surroundings. Ok, maybe you could call this "passive focusing", but I think there is a significant difference between the concepts. These are about the most Zen statements I'm likely to make because I'm not a Buddhist!
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Old 03-22-2010, 02:16 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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By "focus your senses on the wild around you" I'm referring to such things as listening to the water, birds, ..., and/or feeling a gentle breeze, et cetera. I don't know too many backpackers who want to rid their mind of those thoughts/experiences.

Reality
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  #8  
Old 03-22-2010, 08:11 PM
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Bradleystj Bradleystj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
Rest/soak your feet

Hopefully soak you feet down flow from your filter intake . . .

There are many things that one might not like . . .

. . . but filtering water is just another chore
that is easier that ascending that 28-38 deg incline for a mile or 2 . . .
IMO both are part of the trip.

We once were rafting on the Maligne river,
and the one of three rafts That I was on deflated . . .
Buddy one and I just sucked it up as part of the trip,
and almost enjoyed it.

Right

Buddy 2 whinnied and cried the whole way out,
as we all were dragging the raft through dense bush.
Pumping a water filter should be way more fun.

Sorry I guess I just process things in perspective/relative to energy output.
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  #9  
Old 03-22-2010, 08:41 PM
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Scrambler Scrambler is offline
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I use a 10L folding bucket to haul water back to camp, sit down where I'm comfortable, and use my filter to fill all my water containers. It's a relaxing time to take in my surroundings.
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  #10  
Old 03-30-2010, 03:05 PM
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Quills Quills is offline
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Another great part about being the water slave is you get to drink colder fresher water than everyone else.
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