Practical Backpacking™ Forums

Welcome to Practical Backpacking™ Forums (PBF).

You are currently viewing PBF as a guest which has limited access. By becoming a PBF member, you will have full access to view and participate in tens of thousands of informative discussions, to view links and attachments (photos), and will gain access to other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free! Click to Become a PBF Member! Be sure to also explore the Practical Backpacking Podcast.


Go Back   Practical Backpacking™ Forums > Practical Backpacking™ Gear Discussion > Backpacks
HOME FAQ PBF GUIDELINES BLOG PODCAST GALLERY STORE CALENDAR Mark Forums Read

Backpacks The Backpacks forum is for the discussion of backpacking packs (including front packs and pack accessories: hipbelt pockets, pack covers,...).


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-08-2016, 06:22 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Jayhawker Jayhawker is offline
Practical Backpacking™ New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 4
Gregory Baltoro

I was really sold on an Osprey Aether but REI suggested that I take a look at the Baltoro. I haven't made it back to REI yet, maybe tomorrow, but was wondering if anyone has experience with this pack? I know it's heavy and expensive, but I'm wanting a "one and done" pack.

Thanks!!

Joe
Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Sponsors
  #2  
Old 03-09-2016, 01:44 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
I don't have a Baltoro, I have an older Gregory Shasta, which is a great pack. When I need a bigger pack, I'm not at all put off by its weight. It's the pack I take more times than not.

Do an internet search for "Gregory Baltoro" and "reviews." You'll find that pack is highly thought of. I think if you are an ultralighter, Gregory isn't a go-to company, but if you're looking for a long distance hauler that can be pressed into shorter trip use, a Gregory can be a very good choice.

Do spend time with someone who can help you fit the pack, load it up, and wander around the store with it for a while. Make sure the torso size and hip belt work for you, since I've heard a few people complain a Gregory can't fit them. (Obviously, I'm not one of those people.) Can you rent one from REI? If you can, do that before buying.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-12-2016, 03:29 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Boomstix Boomstix is offline
Practical Backpacking™ New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 2
Stick with the Osprey they are an awesome pack. Especially the new ones with the "Anti Gravity" mesh systems. I have the Atmos 65 AG. It sits comfortably and really doesn't feel like you are carrying the weight you are.


Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Sponsors
  #4  
Old 04-12-2016, 07:42 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
philman philman is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: MYOG Cuben, Osprey Atmos 65 AG
Sleeping Gear: MYOG Down Quilt, Enlightened Equipment Accomplice
Shelter: SMD Deschutes CF Tarp, SMD Lunar Duo
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Alton, Illinois
Posts: 99
I just recently purchased the Osprey Atmos 65 AG with the intent of carrying as much weight as possible when my wife comes along. The idea being she will merely carry her essentials and additional clothing and I will carry everything else. That would free her up to "play", taking pictures and such. My cross to bare in life. What that roughly equates to for 3 - season 4 - day trips for the two of us is nearly 40lbs. That runs TOTALLY counter to my personal solo setup for similar conditions (15-18 lbs). So, my thought was I had to find the right tool for the job and the Atmos came highly recommended. We'll see beginning Saturday. It's a ridiculously heavy pack. We'll see if it it lives up to all the hipe. I'll try to report back soon.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-02-2016, 03:48 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
philman philman is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: MYOG Cuben, Osprey Atmos 65 AG
Sleeping Gear: MYOG Down Quilt, Enlightened Equipment Accomplice
Shelter: SMD Deschutes CF Tarp, SMD Lunar Duo
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Alton, Illinois
Posts: 99
I know this thread was about the Gregory Baltoro but since it came up I thought I would pass it along. I now have some limited time with the Osprey Atmos 65 AG and, FWIW, here's what I found:

4 Day trip on the AT in the Smokies two weeks ago. Started just a smidge under 40 lbs. I didn't have an opportunity to spend any "real world trail time" with this pack under load prior to the trip (walking around the store with sandbags in your pack just doesn't cut it) so while I thought everything felt adjusted "just right" at home, once we hit the trail reality quickly kicked in and it took me quite some time to get things adjusted properly. I didn't have the torso height nailed (torso height is adjustable) prior to leaving. One very minor adjustment and done. Fiddled with the belt, straps, and finally load lifters and over time I felt like it found its groove. I have to admit that, once the fit was nailed down, it carried very well at that weight. Seemed like I wasn't really carrying 40 lbs. However, I got the feeling that were you to press this pack much beyond that though, say over 45 lbs, it might start "washing out" if that makes any sense. Like worn shock absorbers. I don't think the suspension is well suited too much above 40 lbs. Otherwise, once you get the fit down it rides very nice!

The temps were VERY warm yet the suspended mesh back panel kept my back pretty cool and dry.

The hip belt pockets are small but I found them sufficient for my needs (a few snacks, small bottle of hand sanitizer, small container of sun screen, lip balm) with the exception of my cell phone which went in my pants cargo pocket. Not my preferred location. Next time it will go in a shoulder strap pocket.

There are two large zippered pockets on the front of the pack (zippers run N/S). While handy, as the pack is loaded to capacity the use of the pockets becomes negligible. You're lucky to cram anything at all in them. The large stretch mesh pocket on the front is great.

Hydration bladder sleeve is internal like most packs and, like most, a bladder is a pain to remove, refill, and replace...if that's the route you choose to go. Lots of alternatives around that of course.

Side mesh pockets are accessible from top and front. I used a bladder on this trip and carried a couple of cheap water bottles with Propel in the side pockets for Momma.

All in all, a very nice pack!

Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gregory Baltoro 75 SC_Dave Backpacks 4 07-08-2011 01:08 PM
Updated Gregory Baltoro SJHiker Backpacks 2 05-09-2008 02:03 PM
Gregory Triconi vs REI Mars jpark4 Backpacks 4 05-11-2007 07:25 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:48 PM.

Backpacking Forums


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2017 Practical Backpacking™
Practical Backpacking is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacker is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Podcast is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Magazine is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™