Practical Backpacking™ Forums

Welcome to Practical Backpacking™ Forums (PBF).

You are currently viewing PBF as a guest which has limited access. By becoming a PBF member, you will have full access to view and participate in tens of thousands of informative discussions, to view links and attachments (photos), and will gain access to other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free! Click to Become a PBF Member! Be sure to also explore the Practical Backpacking Podcast.


Go Back   Practical Backpacking™ Forums > Practical Backpacking™ General Outdoors (Backpacking Related) > Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills
HOME FAQ PBF GUIDELINES BLOG PODCAST GALLERY STORE CALENDAR Mark Forums Read

Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills The Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to ancient and/or primitive style bushcraft/wilderness skills (e.g. firecraft, foraging, natural material construction, modern/primitive tools, long-term wilderness survival,...).


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 01-23-2012, 09:27 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Ralph Ralph is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Valued Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 503
You have to use pure cotton balls (some are made with synthetics). A dab of Vaseline on thumb and forefinger and roll the ball with a little pressure between thumb and forefinger to saturate the ball. an old 35mm film can or a pill bottle is good for storing them. To use: take a ball, pull it out a bit to fluff it up. The fuzz easily catches a spark and ignites, the cotton acting as a wick for the petroleum jelly. These burn hot and for a fair amount of time.

I have used these and they work well but mostly I use TinderQuik, a commercial braided tinder that is dry and compact, when using a spark generator (flint-stick, SparkLite or an empty butane lighter (the latter two can be used with one hand).

Mostly I prepare a bit of birchbark and fine kindling and light the fire with a match. I generally reserve made tinder for when I need a fire quickly or the weather is really lousy.

Note: you can make a "match" from a cotton swab on a wood stick by applying the Vaseline as above. Same procedure, fluff it up a bit, apply spark or fire and you can easily reach into a prepared kindling pile.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-24-2012, 06:26 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Simo Simo is offline
Practical Backpacking™ New Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 8
Mmm.. seems lighter to carry and fast! Next week i'll try! Thank you Ralph
If I'll find difficulties, I'll still have the vaseline for a tatoo!! (not for other!!)
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-24-2012, 10:32 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
richwads richwads is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Shelter: Tarp
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: California
Posts: 483
Char cloth is great for flint and steel fire reenactment, but in a pinch vaseline/cotton is much better. I usually don't take any prepared tinder, but if very wet conditions are expected, char cloth would not be my first choice anyway. I was amazed the first time I tried catching a spark with vaseline impregnated cotton - instant flame! and it burned longer than expected also. for cheap, home made firestarter!
Reply With Quote
Please Click to Visit These Sites
  #14  
Old 01-24-2012, 11:58 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Ralph Ralph is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Valued Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 503
Charcloth does catch a spark well, but usually doesn't flare, instead it burns slowly. The way I always used it was to make a nest of dry tinder with the charcloth in the center. Once it catches the spark blow on it to catch the nest afire then put the burning bundle into a prepared kindling pile (I usually make a little tipi shape but a "log cabin" pile also works well, just leave an opening large enough for the burning tinder pile to be inserted (without knocking down the whole contraption).

We made charcloth in a metal coffee can (when coffee came in metal cans opened with a key). Cut chunks of cloth from an old pillowcase and layer in the bottom. Punch a hole in the lid and put on a slow fire. You want to bake the cloth, not burn it up. Remove from the fire when the smoke coming out of the hole diminishes. If you want to be old-timey, store in a brass tinder box, although an Altoids tin will also work nicely.

Since coffee cans aren't available anymore you will have to improvise. The lid should be pretty snug, you want to exclude oxygen to char rather than burn.

I think it's always a good idea to try some of the old-time methods, even if you don't plan on using them. Knowledge is always useful and one never knows when some obscure skill might come in handy - or save your life.

Lots of stuff can be used to make the tinder pile. Shredded and puffed up pieces of jute cord, tiny cedar twiglets, fine wood shavings, shredded cedar bark, shredded birch bark and so forth.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-24-2012, 02:35 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
richwads richwads is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Shelter: Tarp
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: California
Posts: 483
I use a 1 qt paint can from which the paint has been burned off, and old plaid flannel shirts, which are easy to cut into squares by following the plaid!

Yes, with char cloth good fibrous tinder is REQUIRED.

I agree that trial and error using the old ways are a good way to become efficient with minimal resources. I spent two winters lighting my home's woodstove nightly, to the frustration of my wife, who was constantly finding remnants of my tinder bundle here and there afterwards (oops), and having to wait the minute or so it took me to not use a match. Great fun!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Removing old waterproof coating from nylon cloth Haclil General Gear Discussion 6 02-12-2009 05:00 PM
BernzOmatic Heat Cloth Vinovampire Gear Workshop 7 09-29-2007 05:49 PM
Hardware cloth twokniveskatie Gear Workshop 7 07-29-2006 01:47 PM
GG Polycryo ground cloth gussomer Sleeping Gear 3 06-25-2006 09:53 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:41 AM.

Backpacking Forums


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2017 Practical Backpacking™
Practical Backpacking is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacker is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Podcast is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Magazine is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™