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General Gear Discussion The General Gear Discussion forum is for the discussion of traditional and lightweight (ultralight) backpacking gear that is not covered in other Practical Backpacking™ forums. [Please post about Backpacks, Shelters, Sleeping Gear, Backcountry Kitchen (Food, Stoves) in those respective forum areas.]


View Poll Results: Do you carry a watch on your backpacking trips?
Yes, always 46 77.97%
Yes, sometimes 9 15.25%
No, never 4 6.78%
Voters: 59. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old 02-16-2013, 03:19 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Question Do you carry a watch?

Do you carry a watch on your backpacking trips?

Reality
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  #2  
Old 02-16-2013, 05:56 PM
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Forttom Forttom is offline
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Yes, now a Casio, with lots of nice features such as barometer, etc.
In military, in basic orientation, we used our watches to navigate by, even before we were given any instruction with the compass.

If hiking unfamiliar trails where getting lost is fairly easy, I think it's an indespensible piece of gear. With companies like Casio, making inexpensive, light and nearly indestructible watches with features especially built in for outdoors activities, I can't see a reason not too.

I have a Tag, as a retirement gift from military friends, but now it sit's in a box, as a momento, and as not to add anymore scratches, so I can pass it on when I check out. The Casio's are pretty cheap to replace.

FT
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  #3  
Old 02-16-2013, 08:38 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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i've a nice soviet navy wristwatch, all brass and titanium(doesn't set off metal detectors as it turns out. 100% non-ferrous), hermetic, waterproof(a little), and, most fun: all mechanical.

sure it's a grumble to wind it daily but it's a fun watch to own and has been a conversation piece from time to time.
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  #4  
Old 02-16-2013, 11:35 PM
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big_load big_load is offline
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Yes, I always do. I can usually tell time pretty well by the sun during the day, but it's handy to have a timer and alarm and the correct time whenever I want it.
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  #5  
Old 02-17-2013, 08:57 PM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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My watch is also an altimeter. I've learned (the hard way) to also carry a spare battery for it in my kit.
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  #6  
Old 02-17-2013, 09:40 PM
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Forttom Forttom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandpa
My watch is also an altimeter. I've learned (the hard way) to also carry a spare battery for it in my kit.

My Casio has an altimeter, as well as a barometer and temp and solar powered. It sits in a drawer most of the time, but has never "died" on me. I think those things listed for over $225, but [a store] had them on sale for something like 140ish, plus I had a $30 dollar coupon, so I got it for a little over $100. I also use the chrono feature when using a map to estimate approx. time traveled. No more breaking expensive watches!

FT
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  #7  
Old 02-18-2013, 01:12 AM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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I also carry an old Casio watch with altimeter/barometer. On some trips, the barometer and weather predicting ability have been more important than timekeeping.

I do look at the watch a fair amount when packing, but I think I look at the angle of the sun in the sky more often. Usually gives me a better idea of how much light is left in the day than the watch does.
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  #8  
Old 02-18-2013, 02:01 AM
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Forttom Forttom is offline
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I said I use the chrono feature to....
Sorry, misspoke wasn't thinking. I use the stopwatch feature, which goes to 23:59, as a timer, to judge approx how far i've traveled, and where on the map I should be. No overshooting a way point by an hour....

FT
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  #9  
Old 02-18-2013, 05:23 AM
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Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
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Many times I never bother with a watch if only going out for a day or less (my mobile phone always has it's clock function, and my car has it's clock too, and radio..).

I nearly always do carry a watch for multiday trips. An Avocet Alpine watch I have here has altimeter, barometer and thermometer functions as well; but finding a battery replacement service is the biggest bugbear (Avocet doesn't currently have an agent down here.. ).
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  #10  
Old 02-18-2013, 10:20 AM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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I wear an older model of the women's Axio Mini, which has altimeter and, of course, barometer but not thermometer. It replaced a LaCross XG-55, which had the thermometer and was about twice the size. The Axio is small, has easily replaced battery, and doesn't look feminine enough to make my grandkids embarrassed to be with me. It also has some settings for target altitude, cumulative altitude gain/loss, etc. I've seen some really nice ones advertised but none have been in my budget.

I haven't found thermometers on watches to be too useful since body temperature affects them and I have to take the watch off for a while to get an accurate reading. I have a small digital indoor/outdoor thermometer with outdoor sensor on about a 10' lead that I take with me. It weighs only an ounce or two and cost only a few dollars. When I camp, I string that lead out away from the tent so I can see what the outside air temperature was compared to that in the tent.
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