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Gear List The Gear List forum is the place to post your actual backpacking gear list, and to read what others have in their packs. Don't forget to specify weight.


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  #11  
Old 04-19-2010, 08:23 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austin
Has anyone found that it is easier to bring regular gatorade bottles than to deal with platys? and will 2 one liter bottles be sufficient? it also seems like it would be more difficult to get water into the smaller mouths of the bottles, has this been a problem?

depends on your filling method. the gatorade/1-liter trick has been used a lot. your bulk is higher, but your cost and simplicity are better, so there's that. one more facet of 'everything is a trade-off'. the gatorade can be tougher. a platy in your emergency kit is still a great idea.

Quote:
Originally Posted by austin
Could the duct tape suffice as the thermarest repair kit also?

if you can clean off the thermarest and keep the patch dry. you might need to fiddle with it from time to time. great in a pinch though.


Quote:
Originally Posted by austin
Next, I hear everyone talking about fire starters and matches. Would bringing two small lighters and storing them in different places not be suffiient? why are matches or firestarters any better when they weigh nearly the same?


reduncancy=safety. i carry matches, lighter, and a firesteel. i primarily use the lighter. but lighters can break, or the winds are too high, or your hands are too cold. matches are similar. it can be too wet, or you can lose them. the firesteel goes around my neck on a lanyard. there are times where it works when other things don't. sure, you might never need anything other than the lighter, but better to have and never need, etc. you won't notice the extra ounce and a half(if that) of weight. trust me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by austin

they said that there were not too many bears in the area we were hiking. Would it be completely inorant of me to think that a regular food bag will suffice?


hang it high. hang your cookware with it. hang it well out from trees. of course, there are those big open plains you might be crossing, and bears are less afraid of one or two people than they are of a group.

Quote:
Originally Posted by austin
Any suggestions on pocket knives that won't burn a hole in my pocket?

beretta made an airlite model a while back that was fantastic. see if those are still out there. gerber is the old standby for a lot of folks as they're readily available and well priced. if camillus were still around i'd suggest their all-stainless GI pocket knife.

Last edited by big_load : 04-19-2010 at 09:48 AM.
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  #12  
Old 04-19-2010, 09:51 AM
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big_load big_load is offline
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Every place I've hiked in CO has at least some bear activity, some have a lot, including everywhere I've been along the CDT. Where was the Outward Bound event?
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  #13  
Old 04-19-2010, 10:02 AM
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Wayback Wayback is offline
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Austin,
I carry a Platy hoser and a couple of Gatorade qt bottles, and sometimes a spare 2 liter Platy bladder I can also use with the hose. (I can go through a quart of water an hour in very hot conditions.) I find this works well. I use Micropur treatment and this combination seems to work out so that I can always have some water to drink while the rest is treating. Use one of the bottles to fill the Platy bladders if you have trouble getting the bladders filled at your water source. You can also use a small cook pot or mug for this. I have not (yet) had a Platy problem. The Gatorade bottles are cheap, come with a treat inside, are very tough, and weigh a quarter pound less than a hard Nalgene (1.8 oz vs. 6+ oz)

As for fire starting, I carry two Mini Bic lighters at about 1 oz for both. I carry one in my pocket and the backup in my first aid/repair kit. I have never had one break. I don't know if they ever run out of fuel. I seem to use one for years and then lose it before it ever runs dry. IMHO, except for the Man vs. Nature/Survivor Man and "cool" factors, there is really no need to carry several extra ounces for a flint-and-steel type fire starter. The Mini Bics will do everything you need, and do somethings the other can't readily do, including lighting a cigar or candle lantern.

A versatile folding knife that will not break the bank is a Victorinox Swiss Army "Huntsman" model at about $35. Two good blades, scissors, very nice saw blade, and other surprisingly useful features. I have carried one for over 30 years. The field is wide open on fixed blade knives -- depends on how much knife you want or need and how much you want to spend.

Hope this helps.
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  #14  
Old 04-19-2010, 01:34 PM
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adventure_dog adventure_dog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austin
Would it be completely inorant of me to think that a regular food bag will suffice?
As long as you hang it properly, a regular food bag will be fine - except in areas that require an approved bear canister.

If anything, you'll want to hang your food bag and cook set so that other - smaller, cuter - critters don't get into your stuff.
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  #15  
Old 04-19-2010, 09:49 PM
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austin austin is offline
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hey guys, thanks again for the the comments.

Quote:
Originally Posted by big_load
Every place I've hiked in CO has at least some bear activity, some have a lot, including everywhere I've been along the CDT. Where was the Outward Bound event?

The Outward bound trip started from denver and we drove an hour or two into the mountains..im not exactly sure where it started, but it was in the holy cross district; We ended up in leadville. On the trip, we didn't even hang our food bags;they were just dispersed throughout our backpacks(there were 3 or 4 different food bags for the group).

It seems that there are a variety of knives to choose from, so I don't think that will be a problem thanks to yall.

Two gatorade bottles and a spare platy seems significant enough. Thanks
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  #16  
Old 05-22-2011, 10:09 AM
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crizyal crizyal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austin
On the trip, we didn't even hang our food bags;they were just dispersed throughout our backpacks(there were 3 or 4 different food bags for the group).

I have been hiking in the Holy Cross Wilderness area and seen black bear on my hikes. I know they are there! Please hang a bear bag.
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  #17  
Old 07-16-2011, 05:00 AM
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Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure_dog
You'll be in bear country in both places. An approved bear canister will be required on the JMT; you'll at least need some cord and a caribeaner for bear bagging in Colorado.

Other things I'd add:
  • pocket knife
  • tenacious tape or duct tape for repairs
  • Thermarest repair kit
  • something to dig a cathole with
  • anti-inflamatories (i.e., Advil or Aleve)
  • another bandana or two
  • fire starter and matches
  • sunscreen
  • sunglasses
  • bug dope
  • 1-liter Platypus (so you can treat and drink at the same time)
  • polypro gloves
I agree...

I was thinking pretty much the same when I read the OP - that he was packing a bit light-on in the essentials and toiletries..

Except that I would go for a 2 or 3 litre Hydration sack down here in my part of the world, (I never carried enough water back when I was a teenager..).
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