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Gear List The Gear List forum is the place to post your actual backpacking gear list, and to read what others have in their packs. Don't forget to specify weight.


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  #11  
Old 05-17-2012, 07:32 PM
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Holubar Holubar is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 19
Well, it’s been about 4 years now and I’ve changed a fewthings in my list.
First, I don’t live in AK anymore so I don’t need the handcannon. That saved a lot of weight.
Second, I bought some Leica binoculars to save weight. Thereare lighter optics out there for much less. (But not better unfortunately)
I still carry everything on my ’08 list. My standard ofoutdoor living hasn’t diminished.
In addition to lighter cordage replacement, (tent,drawstrings, etc.), and uber light stuffsacks for everything, my replacementitems have cut my dry weight to about 23.5 lbs, and I still have a luxury campat the end of the day.
I still carry a real tent because I don’t like getting wet andI don’t like bugs crawling on me while I sleep.
Some items that I replaced and the new weight:
Ultralight summit pack- Sea to Summit daypack 2.4oz
Gun/ammo-NA Arms .22 mini revolver* 6.8oz
Holsters-No longer needed -2oz

Binoculars-Leica 8x30 7.8
Asics superlight flats {Campwear, totally worth the weight} 8.6oz
Stove-MSR Simmerlight 6.29oz
Coffee Cup- Sea to Summit 4oz
I know these don’t add up to the 5+lb savingsince ’08. It’s hard to keep up with all the lightening tweaks through theyears. For example, I repackaged all my cooking kit items in much smallercontainers which saved several ounces. I kept buying lighter stakes, althoughthe toothpick thin titanium ones don’t hold worth a darn sometimes. Littletweaks here and there took the ounces off.
Fortunately, materials are still gettinglighter, stronger and more high-tech.
I can’t believe I used to carry a 60lb pack…Heck,I can’t believe I used to be able to carry a 60lb pack. Ahh youth.
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  #12  
Old 05-19-2012, 07:52 PM
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Hanr3 Hanr3 is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 138
Great lists.

I used ot work on Adak Alaska and backpacked across the island a couple of times. Beautiful country for sure.
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  #13  
Old 06-03-2012, 07:21 PM
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nogods nogods is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 213
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysigp226
If I remember correctly that was primarily because those carrying/using a gun were not well trained to do so. When it comes to a novice gun user (eg: you have not taken a multi-day training class and do not shoot regularly) I'm sure bear spray _is_ more effective. But there is nobody who's going to tell me a properly trained gun owner is better off with bear spray. If that were the case marines would be carrying bear spray, not a firearm.

They have training classes for using a firearm on a bear attacking you while you are in a tent?

Have you ever shot a bear? How far did it run before it collapsed? Now imagine shooting a bear 5 feet from your vitals. Ya think it is going to just fall down dead next to you in the tent?
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  #14  
Old 06-04-2012, 03:41 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by nogods
They have training classes for using a firearm on a bear attacking you while you are in a tent?

Have you ever shot a bear? How far did it run before it collapsed? Now imagine shooting a bear 5 feet from your vitals. Ya think it is going to just fall down dead next to you in the tent?

no, but given that all of a sudden this big thing it was messing with made huge flame and owie-noise, it's going to be rocketing for the hills toot-sweet.

you don't need to ever actually HIT the animal you're trying to drive off. even domesticated animals will boogie right the heck out of dodge if you put a round in the dirt in front of them. big noise+ spray of dirt out of nowhere=run i don't understand it.

/has carried a gun on many a hike.
//used it to drive off coyotes a handful of times, once at very close range with charging/challenging behaviors. i never had to aim AT them, just pull the trigger more than once.
///compact 9mm is probably the best thing to take, if you insist on taking more than a .22LR.
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  #15  
Old 10-28-2012, 12:23 AM
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Blazer Blazer is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: alaska
Posts: 13
You're gonna need something a lot bigger then just a 9mm or .22 for bears. Those will only piss it off and wont do much good. If you're going to defend your self against a bear then why have it endure a slow death from a poor decision of firearms? If you're going to defend yourself with a gun then actually do the more humane decision to dispatch the animal in a quick manner. Although those firearms may be appropriate for a coyote, they are no substitute for a bear that can be up to 40x's larger.
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  #16  
Old 10-28-2012, 10:59 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blazer
You're gonna need something a lot bigger then just a 9mm or .22 for bears. Those will only piss it off and wont do much good. If you're going to defend your self against a bear then why have it endure a slow death from a poor decision of firearms? If you're going to defend yourself with a gun then actually do the more humane decision to dispatch the animal in a quick manner. Although those firearms may be appropriate for a coyote, they are no substitute for a bear that can be up to 40x's larger.

given that i've seen .300winmag rounds bounce off of bear skulls(the most likely area you'll hit during a charge), and hit in torso with no effect due to bad placement, the 'something a lot bigger' is probably going to be on the order of an RPG or similar. perhaps a carl gustav recoilless rifle. that might do it.

this is why i love people that hike in the more civilized parts of the world. the assumption that a bear is an unstoppable murder machine. they're as easy to frighten, if not easier, than coyotes. carrying something heavy 'to stop them' will make you look like a poacher or a fool. if you hike smart, you don't need it at all(you can drive them off by yelling at them).

a bear driven off by actually being shot with a 9mm or similar has about a 5% chance of dying. their immune systems are incredibly resilient. their fur is damn near as tough as kevlar. they have a layer of fat under their skin that plugs any holes that might actually be bleeding. their ribcage is essentially a steel cage that a wee little 9mm isn't going to even crack, let alone blow through. you would have to get incredibly lucky to have that bear bleed out.

and, frankly, if i'm attacked by an animal, i don't care what kind of death it has, so long as it stops attacking me. perhaps it's coldhearted of me that i'll give more of a damn about my own hide than making sure whatever critter took exception to me is safe and snuggly warm, or dead instantly, or whatever the criteria for proper resolution of the attack is.
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