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General Gear Discussion The General Gear Discussion forum is for the discussion of traditional and lightweight (ultralight) backpacking gear that is not covered in other Practical Backpacking™ forums. [Please post about Backpacks, Shelters, Sleeping Gear, Backcountry Kitchen (Food, Stoves) in those respective forum areas.]


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  #11  
Old 08-01-2012, 05:28 PM
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Wayback Wayback is offline
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Sure brings back old memories of silently (?) crashing through briars and creeks in the night as human mosquito bait while trying remember the terrain landmarks from a map last seen under a poncho with a red-filtered light and hoping we were in the correct grid square. Smart team leaders always used two pace men because one of them would get distracted and lose his pace count. It's not much fun to be following an azimuth for a distance in the pitch dark only to find that your pace man zoned out an hour earlier and had no idea how far you had come. Actually, with practice and intuition, the process worked amazingly well. FWIW, the signal for the pace count was to tap your boot with your hand. The low, low-tech method, if you had no beads, was simply to tie knots in a boot lace or length of paracord.
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  #12  
Old 08-17-2012, 06:33 PM
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beekeeper beekeeper is offline
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Backpack: Golite Galaxy
Sleeping Gear: Hammock peapod
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Interesting to read this thread as I was one of those Rangers who used the beads as a pacecounter. I still have some that are about 40 years old that I made "back in the day". When you are dead reckoning in a straight line they aren't all that useful as you simply walk an azimuth or bearing until you hit a"control" like a road or a stream or any other terrain feature. Where we found them particularly useful was walking a dogleg route with possibly two or more changes in direction. When the change in direction doesn't take place at a control, you really need a way to know when you have reached the place where you change direction. That was where they shined. Nowadays you simpyl consult your GPS, if the batteries haven't died
Dave Fox
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayback
Sure brings back old memories of silently (?) crashing through briars and creeks in the night as human mosquito bait while trying remember the terrain landmarks from a map last seen under a poncho with a red-filtered light and hoping we were in the correct grid square. Smart team leaders always used two pace men because one of them would get distracted and lose his pace count. It's not much fun to be following an azimuth for a distance in the pitch dark only to find that your pace man zoned out an hour earlier and had no idea how far you had come. Actually, with practice and intuition, the process worked amazingly well. FWIW, the signal for the pace count was to tap your boot with your hand. The low, low-tech method, if you had no beads, was simply to tie knots in a boot lace or length of paracord.
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  #13  
Old 08-17-2012, 06:43 PM
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beekeeper beekeeper is offline
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Backpack: Golite Galaxy
Sleeping Gear: Hammock peapod
Shelter: Tarp
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Fairview, TX
Posts: 106
As someone who was also in the Oregon State University schoo lof Forestry,I really enjoyed toe pedantry. I have pulled a few chains in my time, although Ithink I remember them being a metal tape by that time...
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Originally Posted by tonto
Ok, so here's another variation on the Ranger Bead thing.
It wasn't mentioned in my first essay because that would be pedantic as well as tedious...
To use Paul Harvey' s tag tag line..."Now you know the rest of the story".
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