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Shelters The Shelters forum is for the discussion of backpacking shelters (tents, tarps, poncho-tarps, bivy sacks,...).


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  #1  
Old 04-05-2008, 12:31 AM
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Takas Takas is offline
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First try with a tarp

Over spring break, my wife and I tried using a tarp for the first time, using an A-frame pitch. We got a little rain and mist, but we kept drier than I dared hope. However, we had a lot of very moist air flowing through, and my wife was uncomfortable because of it. I think in a tent the air would have been just as damp or worse, but at least it would have been a little warmer because it wouldn't circulate. So my question is, is there a way to make a tarp more comfortable to someone who doesn't take to cold, moist air, or should I look into tarptents and hammocks?
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Old 04-05-2008, 06:45 AM
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upwardtrail upwardtrail is offline
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as they say, "practice makes perfect."
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Old 04-05-2008, 10:10 AM
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Wayback Wayback is offline
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Modified A-frame/pup tent setup allows most ventilation and thus is most drafty. You will never keep out all drafts, but you can decrease them substantially by pitching one or two edges of the tarp at ground level on the windward side(s) of the tarp. Pitching lower will also help. If the wind is swirling, look for an area with some natural windbreaks. Good luck next time.
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Old 04-10-2008, 08:46 AM
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Rambler Rambler is offline
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One way is to add flaps or "beaks", but another way to create a beak is to create a tie off point about a foot or more back along the ridgeline from the end. OwareUSA makes their tarps this way. Remember that you do not have to put your pole directly under the edge line of the tarp. Place the pole a foot or more away from the tarp. This will let you set your back end even lower to the ground. Tie it off directly to a tree on either end and you will not have to use the pole. In this picture, notice that tie-off point in the halfway point of the outer edge are staked to the ground in an attempt to keep the tarp warmer underneath.
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