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Shelters The Shelters forum is for the discussion of backpacking shelters (tents, tarps, poncho-tarps, bivy sacks,...).


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  #11  
Old 03-21-2008, 09:34 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubaloff
For those that own both, is The One replacing your Lunar Solo or do you intend to use them both for different weather patterns/seasons?

To me, The One is seeming like the perfect fair-weather tent with some decent protection from a light rain and wind.
I've used both... In my opinion the Lunar Solo is likely to handle the blowing rain better, since it can batten down more.

For me, the netting (thus this shelter) is really only needed during bug season - and it's during a time that I don't see any blowing rain (it's unlikely, but not impossible). We all have to determine the where, when, what, and why for ourselves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rubaloff
Ironically, I've only had non-stop rain on two or three of my backpacking trips, so finding that bomb-proof 3-season shelter may be a moot point for me.

Based upon that either one may work for you.

Take some of the helpful comments that others give into consideration. But just make sure that you don't allow yourself to slip into getting something because you feel that certain people have it or that it has this or that award or endorsement (it needs your approval the most). Think it out real good, paying close attention to your real needs. If it's the LS that meets your needs, go with it -- if The One does it for you, then go with it.

One thing that I'll warn you about... Whichever one you get, if you get a little spooked by the size and weight of the ultralight shelter and want to send it back, be sure to hang onto it a little longer and set it up a few more times (days apart). More than a few have sent UL tents back only to wish they had not been so hasty. UL shelters tend to grow on a person some -- it can take a little getting used to the first time around (for some).

I wish you well in your decision.

Reality
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  #12  
Old 03-21-2008, 10:19 PM
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severenz severenz is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2008
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Quote:
Take some of the helpful comments that others give into consideration. But just make sure that you don't allow yourself to slip into getting something because you feel that certain people have it or that it has this or that award or endorsement (it needs your approval the most). Think it out real good, paying close attention to your real needs. If it's the LS that meets your needs, go with it -- if The One does it for you, then go with it.

Reality, this is great advice and is unfortunately what makes the decision so tough for me. Because I've never owned an ultralight solo shelter, I'm not totally sure what my exact needs are. From other folks, I've learned about issues I never would have thought about and probably saved myself some trouble by skipping specific shelters.

As with any other gear that I've used and changed over the years, I understand that sometimes one simply has to jump in, buy something, and try it out. We can learn about our backcountry needs simply by trying new gear. That being said, a $25 LED headlamp is a little different than a $300 solo tent, so I'm paying a bit more attention and soliciting for as many opinions as I can get. I suppose the worst that can happen is that I'll have to sell the tent and try again.

The tough thing for me is that I'm an avid online shopper and research even minor purchases very thoroughly. However, never in my history of online shopping have I had so much difficulty in choosing a product.

Once again, thanks for all the advice. I doubt I'd go wrong with either tent and since I'm a gear head, I may end up trying out more than one. I'll let you guys know which one I go with and add my opinions on the appropriate threads.
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  #13  
Old 03-22-2008, 07:44 AM
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stb_43 stb_43 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
By the way, is that the way that you plan to use your stakes?
Reality

Reality-
Yes; I've used the 9" Eastons as shown in the pictures since I cut off and replaced the shockcord. If ground is at all firm, the longer stakes work fine leaving a couple of inches above ground. There is still as much of the stake in the ground as with shorter 6 inchers although, of course, the stake is subjected to a greater leverage force. Haven't had any issue except in very loose, sandy soil where any stake has a problem (and I try to avoid anyway).
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  #14  
Old 03-29-2008, 08:03 AM
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stb_43 stb_43 is offline
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I've had a PM request to post more info and pictures on the guy-out mods I did to my Lunar Solo. I've been pretty busy and will do this as soon as I can but will probably consolidate it all on an older existing thread about pitching the LS.

Keep in mind that Ron has recently changed design so that the bungee connection is from the upper corner of the bathtub floor (instead of the base) to where the webbing is attached to the fly (not the stake end of the webbing). The mod I did might only apply to the earlier version of the "e" prior to this change. However, I've not actually seen the change and don't know if it fully resolves the pitching limitations and while adequately allowing stretching the floor to full dimensions and keeping the mesh straight without lifting the corners of the floor off the ground. The SMD website picture indicates that the new version will be better but I'd need to see it (or more detailed pictures) to know for sure.
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  #15  
Old 03-31-2008, 04:47 PM
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Grannyhiker Grannyhiker is offline
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Backpack: SMD Comet
Sleeping Gear: WM Ultralight/KookaBay custom insulated air pad
Shelter: Tarptent/Gossamer Gear Squall Classic
 
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Location: NW Oregon
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I was eyeing The One, but after checking the measurements for both The One and my current Lunar Solo, I'm sticking with the latter. The Lunar Solo has more floor space so there's plenty of room for my dog as well as me. The floor space in The One is exactly 10 square feet less than in the Lunar Solo. My dog is part of my sleeping system, so I need him in the tent!
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  #16  
Old 04-02-2008, 12:44 PM
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Ben2World Ben2World is offline
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Torn Between the Two

I am torn between the Lunar Solo and The One. Light weight is good, but I like the Lunar's added floor space and more importantly, that it requires only one pole. I don't always carry my trekking poles. But when I do, the Lunar would allow me to use one pole when going on evening hikes after setting up the tent...
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  #17  
Old 04-02-2008, 12:57 PM
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FamilyGuy FamilyGuy is offline
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Four things:

1.) The One is going to be much better at any type of moderate snow load than the Lunar due to the two pole design and musch less unsupported fabric.

2.) The One is bigger than the dimensions suggest because the rear wall of the shelter angles out considerably, attached to the floor by angled mesh. So in fact the width of the shelter is much greater than it would appear just by the written specs.

3.) The One will have more usable space for the hiker to physically move around than the Lunar. It also has more headroom over a greater area.

4.) The Lunar, however, is going to be a better shelter for horizontal blowing wind. The way The One is currently configured, the front cannot be lowered to the ground (which is the only fault with this shelter in my opinion).
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  #18  
Old 04-02-2008, 01:02 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FamilyGuy
4.) The Lunar, however, is going to be a better shelter for horizontal blowing wind. The way The One is currently configured, the front cannot be lowered to the ground (which is the only fault with this shelter in my opinion).

Yes, I agree ... the inability to lower the vestibule can be a problem in the wind. In such circumstances, placement/location is paramount.

Reality
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  #19  
Old 04-02-2008, 01:09 PM
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Ben2World Ben2World is offline
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Curious, how far down toward the ground does the vestibule flaps of The One reach -- as compared to the Lunar?
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