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Sleeping Gear The Sleeping Gear forum is for the discussion of sleeping gear (bags, mats, quilts...).


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  #11  
Old 11-09-2013, 12:32 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirstRWD
Dsuursoo, I think I might end up going with a long pad just for the width too. Maybe there will be a convenient way to use the extra length at the top end, and fold it down to make a raised pillow area or something.

Good sleep is one area I just don't want to compromise too much. It makes a noticeable difference for me the next day.

if you're not going to stickler about weight, alps mountaineering makes a line of pads that have multiple options in the wider sizes, including a short length pad. the also make an XL pad that clocks in at a whopping 30 inches wide.
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  #12  
Old 11-09-2013, 03:13 PM
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FirstRWD FirstRWD is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
Backpack: Detours 40L or Bike Panniers
Sleeping Gear: Homemade Synthetic Quilt
Shelter: North Face Mica FL 2
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: WI
Posts: 85
Thanks. I hadn't heard of that company before(still pretty new and lots to learn). I'm not terribly worried about a little weight that gives me better sleep. I'd rather lose weight elsewhere and sleep better if I'm carrying too much. And most of my "backpacking" so far and plans for the coming year are more in bike-packing and doing day-hikes from the main site. Then the weight doesn't make as big of a difference anyway.

I did just find that exped makes a medium-wide option which I somehow overlooked previously. It's a bit lighter than the alps mountaineering mats, but in return it does cost a bit more. The old "needs" vs. budget decision...

Last edited by FirstRWD : 11-09-2013 at 03:30 PM.
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  #13  
Old 11-09-2013, 08:12 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirstRWD
Thanks. I hadn't heard of that company before(still pretty new and lots to learn). I'm not terribly worried about a little weight that gives me better sleep. I'd rather lose weight elsewhere and sleep better if I'm carrying too much. And most of my "backpacking" so far and plans for the coming year are more in bike-packing and doing day-hikes from the main site. Then the weight doesn't make as big of a difference anyway.

I did just find that exped makes a medium-wide option which I somehow overlooked previously. It's a bit lighter than the alps mountaineering mats, but in return it does cost a bit more. The old "needs" vs. budget decision...

alps manages to straddle 'cost vs quality' really well. their stuff is extremely good for the money. their pads are also thicker, for a given size, than most of the competition's pads. you pay in weight but it's like sleeping on a real bed. i'm tempted to just get a pair of the xxl basecamp pads to replace our airbed for car-camping. they're over 4" thick and extremely comfortable.

another thing to look at, in keeping with the spirit of this thread, is those pads with bumpers on the sides to keep you on them. i know one of the big store brands has a line of them, there might be a few others. you can stick with standard size and not shift off as easy.
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  #14  
Old 12-17-2013, 08:44 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
Sleeping Gear: Kelty LightYear Down 20 / ENO Doublenest Hammock
Shelter: Granite Gear White Lightnin' tarp
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Posts: 285
For me 20" just ain't enough, never has been. I tend to flop around when sleeping on the ground. 30" seems more like a necessity than a druther. Now I don't sleep on the ground much anymore as I have been converted to hanging between trees. Not converted so much as saved, really. But I still do find myself beached occasionally so the subject is not irrelevant.

I suppose that, for those ectomorphs who sleep in a mummy bag, 20" is just fine as you can't somnambulate very far across the planet whilst all trussed up like a Christmas goose anyway. But I myself, being a mesomorph, don't ever get into a mummy bag, preferring to use it a quilt. Of course the wanton exercise of freedom has its penalties. Rolling off the pad and onto the cold hard ground is one of 'em.

There is a method to this madness. I thrash about, testing to find that that one area of my creaky body that aches somewhat less than the rest of me, and thence do carefully place that spot upon my beloved BA Aircore for as long as the absence of pain persists. And since that spot moves around so too do I. But you just can't make all that happen readily on a 20" pad, not even an Aircore.

Not to make too fine a point here but it is a mystery to me how gear makers ever came up with 20" as a standard in the first place. I'm not a big guy, I am not overweight, I do not have a "gut" but I do have a 46" chest and the shoulders to go with it - I've been a farmer/logger/lumberman my whole life so exercise has never been an elective for me, I've never had any need to go to a gym and never much appreciated the musty "atmosphere" of such institutions, either - and for me, nope, 20" isn't even close. And all the evidence suggests that smallish people are not in the majority here in America. North Korea, yes, California, no. We have proteins and fats and...20" sleeping pads. I don't get it.

Perhaps it is the lemming phenomena. Light is always better, follow the light even if it blinds 'ya, and it will, just keep on a' runnin' - 20" is good, make yourself fit, that's what they all are, you'll get used to it.

Naw. Get a hammock. That's what I did and it was the best decision I ever made regarding kit for the boonies. Yeah, a hammock. At least it will cut down the hours you spend grunting and groaning on a ground-bound pad.

It's worth a shot.



Ben
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  #15  
Old 12-18-2013, 12:01 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
it is a mystery to me how gear makers ever came up with 20" as a standard in the first place.

Ben

i'm thinking it's either somewhere between 'it fits under an external frame without poking out from the sides' or 'it fits INTO an external frame pack without poking out the top'.
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  #16  
Old 12-18-2013, 04:15 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Shelter: Tarp
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: California
Posts: 483
Hey, I'm 135 lb and can barely keep my arms on a 20" pad (when sleeping on my back), and always wondered how bigger folks (almost everyone) can stand these little pads. I mostly sleep on my side tho, and the width isn't a problem then, only needing to pad one shoulder and one hip. I use a BA insulated air core now and will appreciate the new trend of making the outer tubes a little bigger so you at least know where you are on the pad!! Maybe in my next upgrade (or my next life).
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  #17  
Old 12-18-2013, 07:36 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Benwaller Benwaller is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
Sleeping Gear: Kelty LightYear Down 20 / ENO Doublenest Hammock
Shelter: Granite Gear White Lightnin' tarp
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Posts: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
i'm thinking it's either somewhere between 'it fits under an external frame without poking out from the sides' or 'it fits INTO an external frame pack without poking out the top'.

Makes sense but it's still pretty silly. Seems to me that comfort should drive design and that a rational product manager in the pad business should always consider the insufficiencies of his product offerings in order to at least try to improve sales. But I guess if you can get people to "like" a product on facebook, driven to do so by the hype you feed them coupled with their own ignorance of what they actually want, well apparently that is sufficient success in the post-post-modern age and no further tinkering with the business plan is necessary.

It's weird. We have precious few backpackers as it is and the present trend is toward fewer and fewer people lumbering into the woods for shorter and shorter periods of time, and what do we get?

We get mauve.

Regardless our misplaced adoration of Super Being Backpackers and their unrelenting self-flagellation in pursuit of velocity the fact is that sleeping on a narrow, short, uncomfortable pad with your legs propped up on a pack is not what most people who still go into the woods, and there really aren't that many of them, want to be doing. Most folks I know would prefer to awake refreshed, happy to be in the woods on Day 2 rather than looking forward to going home on Day 3. And that's not likely on a 20" pad.



Ben
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