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Sleeping Gear The Sleeping Gear forum is for the discussion of sleeping gear (bags, mats, quilts...).


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  #11  
Old 10-05-2011, 09:15 PM
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DeLvxe DeLvxe is offline
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Backpack: ULA Circuit
Sleeping Gear: Golite Ultra 20 and POE mat
Shelter: SMD Lunar Duo
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 51
insulation

The pad is insulated. The insulation on my 2/3 length pad is concentrated around the shoulders and hips.

Insulation isn't too bad, but it seems a bit colder than the older POE Max Thermo it replaced.

Terry
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  #12  
Old 10-05-2011, 09:45 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,954
Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure_dog
I'd appreciate any updates when and if you do take it out in colder temps.
Will do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BuffaloSkipper
I presume this is not an insulated pad? If so, I did not realize that, and makes a difference.
It is insulated. I indicated the insulation in the first post. And there's also a heat-reflective property. It's likely to need supplemental insulation in freezing conditions. YMMV.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Delvxe
Insulation isn't too bad, but it seems a bit colder than the older POE Max Thermo it replaced.
The Peak Elite AC is actually the replacement for the Ether Elite 6.

Reality
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  #13  
Old 10-11-2011, 07:39 AM
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BuffaloSkipper BuffaloSkipper is offline
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Backpack: ULA Circuit
Sleeping Gear: Hammock, UQ, TQ
Shelter: Terrapin Tarp custom
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Deep South
Posts: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
It is insulated. I indicated the insulation in the first post. And there's also a heat-reflective property. It's likely to need supplemental insulation in freezing conditions. YMMV.
Reality

Thanks for the correction. I overlooked that. Where we are, we are only below freezing a few nights a year, and not in areas where there is often frozen ground due to periods of below freezing temps, so this may be a good pad for my and our scouts.
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  #14  
Old 07-22-2012, 08:48 PM
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adventure_dog adventure_dog is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Portland, OR
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I have had the Pacific Outdoor Equipment Peak Elite AC mat for about 8 months. I've used it several times on overnight outings recently and probably won't be using it in anything other than +60-degree temps in the future. My most recent trip was two nights at 4,700' and 5,000' in the Pacific Northwest, humid conditions, with overnight lows in the mid-40s. I was sleeping in a 20-degree down sleeping bag.

I am a cold sleeper (as many women are) and the first night I couldn't sleep well because of cold spots on my heels, hips/low back, and shoulders. The second night was at higher altitude so I fortified the mat with my backpack under my feet, a sit pad under my hips, and a mylar emergency blanket wrapped around the pad. I also brought the dog into my sleeping bag. These interventions made the mat more tolerable from the cold, but my sleeping comfort was compromised because of all of my additions.

Sans add-ons, I found this mat to be generally comfortable. The mat performs best on very flat ground, as I find that it loses air throughout the night and can sink into the terrain, creating pressure points in the gaps between the vertical tubes. The POE mat doesn't feel overly narrow, even with the tapered ends, and the length fits me well at 5' 9". My mat weighed in at 12 oz and packs down easily and compactly. It takes about 15-20 breaths to fill it.

I found this mat to be better for warm sleepers and/or for warmer climates with mild nighttime temps. If you're sensitive to cold, proceed with caution. For an additional 4 ounces, I will take the full-length all-season Neo Air for mountain nights in the Cascades - no dogs required.
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  #15  
Old 07-22-2012, 11:40 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adventure_dog
I found this mat to be better for warm sleepers and/or for warmer climates with mild nighttime temps. If you're sensitive to cold, proceed with caution.
I'd have to agree with this. However, I'm sure my idea of what's warm or cold differs from yours.

The coldest I've used it without an additional ccf mat was 45 deg. F (rainy weather) - with a down quilt draped over me. I had on an ultra thin base layer. I also wore merino wool socks. I got cold (on top) one time when I removed the quilt from my torso, because I thought it wasn't cold out because I was quite comfortable. However, it was cold enough to make me cover back up.

This was simply one overnight experience. I'd say without hesitation that other trips (same approx. temp) could have different results.

I've been cold on warm temp trips with similar gear that I've stayed warm with on colder trips. Variables abound. I learned long ago, as a child in scouts, that one person's gear experience is not that of another.

Each person should do appropriate testing for his/herself. Hundreds of gear items that work for others are poor choices for me. I've also read of several items that do not work for others that perform wonderfully for me.

There's not likely to be any piece of comfort gear (e.g. shoes, bag, mat, jacket,...) that I wouldn't suggest that people proceed with caution regarding - and I certainly do not recommend taking other peoples experiences with gear and running with it unchecked for personal approval.

I've got a strong, personal opinion about "reviews." When it comes to personal comfort: they mean nearly zero to me - in terms of leading me to opt for the item(s). The feature set/specs and construction are one thing, how it "feels" (performs) for me (others) is quite another (read subjective).

Thanks for relating your personal experience with this mat. For those who aren't careful (cautious) making their gear selections, your experience serves as a good admonition.

For me, these issues are worked out in my backyard, rather than the mountains. Test Test Test.

Reality
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