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Sleeping Gear The Sleeping Gear forum is for the discussion of sleeping gear (bags, mats, quilts...).


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  #1  
Old 01-19-2012, 03:08 AM
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Haclil Haclil is offline
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Bag for both Heat & Cold

Oh boy, tomorrow I'm going to trek in an area where night temps will be 34F some nights and up to 60F other nights!

For flexibility (i.e. the layering system) my plan is to take two ultra-lite bags. One of them is designated good down to 42F (6C) and the other down to 47F (10F). I want to avoid taking my old heavy and bulky "arctic" mummy bag.

Darned if I know whether the two together will keep me warm on the 34-degree-Fahrenheit nights!

What would you recommend?
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  #2  
Old 01-19-2012, 05:47 AM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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I would say, yes. I used a setup like that with a Slumberjack SoLite (40 degree) inside a Slumberjack Deelite (30 degree) and was comfortable at about 10 degrees and I sleep cold. It works best of one bag is smaller so when nested the insulation compression is minimized. The space between the two bags also traps dead air, increasing the effective insulation. One downside is having to fiddle with two zippers.
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  #3  
Old 01-19-2012, 10:08 AM
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SSDD SSDD is offline
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Hmm IIRC a normal 40 deg down bag has a loft of about 3/4" and a normal 30 deg bag is 1.5"-2" loft so that should help.

Now here is a trick I use when I am in sub 0 deg temps with my o deg bag I will take gummy bears and eat a handful before bed and every time I wake up to keep the internal fire burning, Also a good just before bed thing is a box of jello with only 1-2 cups of hot water and drink it as it will give you a lot of calories and warmth to start the night with.

remember in a tent the air temp is about 5-10 deg warmer than outside and use base layers and you should be ok


Good luck and have fun

Last edited by SSDD : 01-19-2012 at 10:44 AM.
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  #4  
Old 01-19-2012, 10:44 PM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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Backpack: GoLite Pinnacle
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I think you'll find using one bag inside the other will actually be too much insulation for 34 degrees.

You can probably get by with one of those bags and a bag liner. If it's too cold, wear some of your layers.

Silk mummy liners are generally thought to take your temperature rating down approximately ten degrees.

About fifteen months ago, my brother in law went on his first backpacking trip and I think the REI guy retired on all the stuff Bill bought. Bill had so much gear, he didn't bring his sleeping bag, thinking he'd be warm enough just sleeping in his clothes. He wasn't. We opened my 20 degree down bag and used it as a quilt and we were fine in temps down to about 30.

Bill had a fifty pound pack when we started that hike. Mine was thirty, and only because I had a bunch of his gear in mine, too. After the third night, he stashed about twenty pounds of gear in the woods by a Forest Service road for us to pick up on the way back. Three months ago, we backpacked together again and Bill had a twenty two pound pack. He's a believer now.
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  #5  
Old 01-30-2012, 12:10 AM
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djtrekker djtrekker is offline
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This is a late post I guess, but an interesting topic. For down to 30 degrees I stay with my 40 deg down bag. If needed, I carry a Sea To Summit Thermolite liner (heavy by liner standards, but only 13 oz). I have my fleece pants and wool socks, so by wearing the fleece and wool, sleeping in the liner and cinching up the hood, I'm good to probably 15 degrees. In a tent, I'm probably good to 10 degrees of outside temp, though I've not pushed my 40 deg bag that far.
I routinely use the liner with 40 deg bag to 30-40 deg temps.
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  #6  
Old 01-30-2012, 10:31 AM
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richwads richwads is offline
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I think a 40 deg bag can be usable up to 60 deg, if used as a quilt and you leave leg(s) and/or arm(s) uncovered. It can also be used down to 34 or so with clothing added (base layer, jacket, stocking cap as required).

I have sweated out a couple warm trips in a mummy 20 deg bag that mosquitos drove me into. Also, I have unexpectedly experienced frosty nights with a 40 deg bag, and found myself getting up and putting more clothes on in the middle of the night. Oh well . . . .
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  #7  
Old 02-24-2012, 06:37 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
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My practice in such conditions is to pack a 40 degree down bag and wear a down jacket if it gets too cold for the bag. Works well enough for those temps, doesn't take up a lot of room in the pack and I always pack the jacket anyway.

It's a practical way to get more range out of a lightweight sleeping bag. Besides, it's what's in the closet.

Ben
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