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Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills The Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to ancient and/or primitive style bushcraft/wilderness skills (e.g. firecraft, foraging, natural material construction, modern/primitive tools, long-term wilderness survival,...).


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  #11  
Old 12-21-2010, 01:47 PM
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beekeeper beekeeper is offline
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I picked up two hides this morning and put them in the freezer. I did it this way because I need to put a scraper together to start and I need to make a fleshing beam. Then I can do the fleshing, soaking, graining, rinsing, acidifying, and membraning over about 4 to 5 days. As I understand it, this is the hardest work. Then I may refreeze or continue on with the wringing and dressing and then refreeze it or go on to wringing and softening at which point it is dry. The last part, the smoking, I can do when I can give it uninterrupted attention. (I don't want to burn up my hide after all the previous work).
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  #12  
Old 02-02-2011, 03:59 PM
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beekeeper beekeeper is offline
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I have a great scraping blade for fleshing now, which is an old planer blade. I also have a schedule 80 green waterpipe that is about 6 feet long and 8" in diameter with about 1/2 " thick walls that I plan to use as my fleshing and graining beam. Since it was 13 degrees outside today I will probably wait till things warm up a bit before starting.
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  #13  
Old 02-02-2011, 08:34 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beekeeper
I have a great scraping blade for fleshing now, which is an old planer blade. I also have a schedule 80 green waterpipe that is about 6 feet long and 8" in diameter with about 1/2 " thick walls that I plan to use as my fleshing and graining beam. Since it was 13 degrees outside today I will probably wait till things warm up a bit before starting.
Brrrr . .
Never thought of pvc pipe for a fleshing beam, but it should work great. Logs tend to get dents and divots that can catch the scraper and damage the hide, but the plastic should hold up well. Are you using the square back of the planer blade? I noticed that Tamara Wilder sells supplies for tanning, including a scraper made from a planer blade.
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  #14  
Old 02-03-2011, 08:03 AM
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beekeeper beekeeper is offline
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It is a blade I got from Braintan and I am using the beveled edge that has been purposely dulled so that it doesn't cut the skin.
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  #15  
Old 12-17-2012, 06:22 AM
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beekeeper beekeeper is offline
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It's been a long time coming together, but I finally put the fleshing beam together with a hide and scraper and fleshed a Nilgai hide yesterday. I plan to get a 30 gallon plastic trash can and mix 20 gallons of water with a cup of potassium hydroxide and flesh out a white tail hide, then dump them both into the solution for a couple of days to buck them.

I learned that there is a trick you can use when making a bucking solution out of wood ashes. When the right amount of wood ash has been added to the water, an egg will float only showing a nickle to half dollar sized part of the egg above the solution. It doesn't work with potassium hydroxide flakes, or red devil lye.
Also, I have fleshed two more hides, both whitetail deer hides. One I put back on ice, the other I put in the bucking solution. Friday I will pull one out and scrape the hair and grain.

Last edited by beekeeper : 12-18-2012 at 03:42 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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