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Sleeping Gear The Sleeping Gear forum is for the discussion of sleeping gear (bags, mats, quilts...).


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  #1  
Old 03-25-2012, 06:51 PM
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ferball ferball is offline
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Floor Mat for Sleeping

Anybody ever use those interlocking foam floor mats for a sleeping pad? I am trying to put some gear together on the cheap, and I have had these floor mats sitting in the kids closet for a couple of years and they seem like they would work.
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  #2  
Old 03-26-2012, 02:41 AM
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Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
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I've used those kinds of dense foam inter-locking mats/tiles (12" square) in workshop situations before (to stand on when you spend some time at a bench or machine tool..).

And just personally I reckon that particular foam used in those clip-together tiles would be a little too hard/firm for me for a sleeping mat ~ but obviously it varies with everybodys own tastes (and how old your bones are feeling at the time..).

I don't want anything firmer/more dense than those 'blue foam' mats that only cost a few dollars (I picked up a couple of 6-ft ones for only $2 each once at discount store when they clearing them out..).
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  #3  
Old 03-26-2012, 12:25 PM
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ferball ferball is offline
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Well I did some trimming and put together a 22" x 84" sleeping mat. It breaks down and stacks nice, now I just have to sleep on it to see how dumb of an idea it was.
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  #4  
Old 03-26-2012, 05:25 PM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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Backpack: GoLite Pinnacle
Sleeping Gear: Moonstone Lucid 800 w/Neo Air pad
Shelter: Tarptent Sublite Tyvek & Tarptent Double Rainbow
 
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Location: Texas
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I would think it would be a little on the heavy side. Of course, thirty five years ago, el cheapo here tried to use bubble wrap. It wasn't heavy but it sure was bulky and things popped every time I rolled it up to pack it or moved when attempting to sleep on it. It wasn't too long before there wasn't much of a pad left, not to mention the explosions kind of have a tendency to keep a person up.

Last edited by Grandpa : 03-26-2012 at 05:29 PM.
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  #5  
Old 03-26-2012, 05:47 PM
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texasbb texasbb is offline
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Backpack: ULA Catalyst
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Based on the ones I've seen, I'd expect that to be (1) a bit heavy and (2) a poor insulator. Be sure to report back here after you try it.
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Old 03-26-2012, 06:10 PM
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ferball ferball is offline
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There will be some backyard testing before hauling it into the woods, it is on the heavy side, not crazy heavy, but enough to make a difference. Insulation wise I'll let you know in a week or two when I have a chance to try it out.
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Old 03-26-2012, 08:54 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandpa
I would think it would be a little on the heavy side. Of course, thirty five years ago, el cheapo here tried to use bubble wrap. It wasn't heavy but it sure was bulky and things popped every time I rolled it up to pack it or moved when attempting to sleep on it. It wasn't too long before there wasn't much of a pad left, not to mention the explosions kind of have a tendency to keep a person up.

the mental image i have of this amuses me.


i confess, i like this idea of ferball's for the fact that unlike the rollout mats... these STAY FLAT when you lay them out.

depending on the floorpad they can actually be quite soft, too.
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  #8  
Old 03-27-2012, 08:26 AM
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Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
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I bought some 2 ft. square black high-density foam tiles recently to place in the garage at home, when I'm finished doing over the workshop section...

I think they may have included some recycled/chipped tyre rubber in the foam to make it harder than normal (but still a lot lighter in weight than plain thick rubber matting..).

While these aren't practical in any way for actual backpacking, I reckon they could be quite handy and flexible for car camping or caravanning.
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  #9  
Old 03-27-2012, 08:27 AM
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Ralph Ralph is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
these STAY FLAT when you lay them out.

This is a advantage with the Z-rest pad and a couble of others scored to fold flat.

On the other hand to save $$ the famous "blue pad" is about as cheap as they get, and can be trimmed to fit your needs. Gluing a thin strip of aluminum bar to the end allows tighter rolling, but further increases the tendency to curl when deployed.
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  #10  
Old 03-27-2012, 09:56 AM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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Backpack: GoLite Pinnacle
Sleeping Gear: Moonstone Lucid 800 w/Neo Air pad
Shelter: Tarptent Sublite Tyvek & Tarptent Double Rainbow
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 370
I had the infamous blue foam pad back in the early '70s. The color went with the bruises I got from trying to sleep on something so minimal. Once at South Rim in Big Bend, my brother and I spied a blue foam pad at the base of the 500' cliff. We don't know if it blew there or was pitched there by an enraged sleep deprived backpacker.

I do find them and my Z-Rest useful for crawling under the car when doing maintenance. After my knee surgery twenty years ago, I could no longer kneel on anything hard so I used small sections of blue foam as something to kneel on when backpacking but now use a Gossamer Gear SitLight for that.
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