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Gear Workshop The Gear Workshop forum is for the discussion of homemade backpacking gear, gear modifications, and repairs.


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  #11  
Old 03-05-2014, 04:26 PM
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striker striker is offline
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Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Gregory Jade 38
Sleeping Gear: MYOG down quilt
Shelter: Bilgy Tarp Tent
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: AZ
Posts: 35
Looks great! Glad it turned out. Now to finish mine...
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  #12  
Old 03-05-2014, 05:17 PM
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philman philman is offline
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Backpack: MYOG Cuben, Osprey Atmos 65 AG
Sleeping Gear: MYOG Down Quilt, Enlightened Equipment Accomplice
Shelter: SMD Deschutes CF Tarp, SMD Lunar Duo
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Alton, Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by striker
Looks great! Glad it turned out. Now to finish mine...

Thanks striker (and reality)! Please pass along pics and details. Momma's wanting one now so my next attempt better be spot on! I'm anxious to see and hear about what you came up with.
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  #13  
Old 12-29-2014, 09:13 PM
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philman philman is offline
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Backpack: MYOG Cuben, Osprey Atmos 65 AG
Sleeping Gear: MYOG Down Quilt, Enlightened Equipment Accomplice
Shelter: SMD Deschutes CF Tarp, SMD Lunar Duo
 
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Location: Alton, Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by striker
I can relate to philman's comments about the fabrics! I am working on a pertex/momentum quilt right now and had the same feelings when I first saw the fabric! I have sewn most of the baffles on and I have to say that so far it isn't so bad. Much easier than sewing silnylon. I haven't needed a walking foot for either the silnylon or these new fabrics. I have found that if your sewing machine has a "low" or "slow" setting that this helps the fabric to feed evenly. I cut a small piece of each of the fabrics to mess around with including trying to poke through them, snag them, etc. I think they are much stronger than they feel.

Just wondering striker, how did the quilt turn out? Did you go with synthetic or down? One of these days I'm going to put one together for the Mrs (assuming my hands work!!!) and was wondering what suggestions/ideas/thoughts you might have.
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  #14  
Old 01-05-2015, 10:08 AM
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striker striker is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Gregory Jade 38
Sleeping Gear: MYOG down quilt
Shelter: Bilgy Tarp Tent
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: AZ
Posts: 35
Actually I made one of each. First I made a synthetic one to test my design. Then I made a down one. I have some photos of each in my gallery. The down one is better and I use it most of the time, the exception being when it is too warm. I think it has about 3 inches of loft.

Well, as far as construction, I would say I really like having a strap system to hold it to the pad, a zipper, and the draft tube on the top of the bag. I made both of mine a bit longer than me and when I cinch the top of the bag just a little bit, it makes somewhat of a hood with the draft tube that I can pull over the top of me. I sleep on my side and this design works very well for me. I am also glad that I put a ton of down in the foot area. I am also pleased with how I constructed the down bag versus the synthetic bag. I used a differential cut and made the outside piece larger than the liner. More importantly, I cut the outside and liner pieces square and then shaped them into a tapered shape using darts rather than making tapered sides on the edges of the fabric. This gives the bag a true curve shape that creates less pull on the insulation. I'm not sure if that description made sense, I think I have pictures somewhere. I can feel a difference in the amount of pull on the outside of the shell with this design versus my synthetic bag.

As far as things to do differently, I do not think that the draft tube along the zipper makes enough difference in this case to bother with it since 99% of the time I don't zip it. The other 1% of the time i can roll on top of the zipper to stop drafts. When I assembled the down bag I used pins instead of tape out of laziness. I think next time I would still use pins because I hate tape, but I'd use superfine pins because I do lose a small amount of down. For the synthetic bag, I didn't do any quilting or tacking of the insulation to the shell when I first made it, but I had to do this at a later date because it was a bit unstable.

I've used my down bag for almost a year now and I just love it. It is one of my most professional looking DIY items.

How about you philman? What did you learn? How is your green bag working out?
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  #15  
Old 01-05-2015, 01:54 PM
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philman philman is offline
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Backpack: MYOG Cuben, Osprey Atmos 65 AG
Sleeping Gear: MYOG Down Quilt, Enlightened Equipment Accomplice
Shelter: SMD Deschutes CF Tarp, SMD Lunar Duo
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Alton, Illinois
Posts: 99
First of all, that is an AMAZING looking quilt! Beautiful! I jumped right in and went straight to the down quilt, following a tutorial I found online. Made some adjustments in length and width to what I "thought" would be appropriate for me. In hindsight I probably should have gone the same route in making a synthetic before the down. Mine needs to be a tad longer.

As for the straps, I'm still on the fence. I flop around a lot at night and find myself having to tuck the thing back in under me now and then. Do you find that the straps allow enough room to turn over yet keep the sides under you?

3" of loft is impressive. What grade and amount of down did you wind up using? How did the finished weight come out? What materials did you use for the shell and baffles?

I don't know that I would have used the full 12 oz of down I got from Thru-Hiker but I do wish I had used a bit more in the foot end. The fact that mine doesn't have a true closed foot box lends itself to some loss of heat. I suppose I could make a down "plug" but just haven't found it really necessary to this point. One thing I do like about the open foot box is being able to just use the thing like a blanket. I've done that on several occasions and when Momma comes along, which is usually only when its above 50 deg, we'll just leave it open and spread it over both of us, though she usually winds up with the whole thing. That's in addition to the lightweight Lafuma synthetic bag she carries! I can't win.

All in all, I love mine but I gotta say that yours looks like a piece of artwork! Incredible!
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  #16  
Old 01-05-2015, 03:31 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by philman
First of all, that is an AMAZING looking quilt! Beautiful! I jumped right in and went straight to the down quilt, following a tutorial I found online. Made some adjustments in length and width to what I "thought" would be appropriate for me. In hindsight I probably should have gone the same route in making a synthetic before the down. Mine needs to be a tad longer.

As for the straps, I'm still on the fence. I flop around a lot at night and find myself having to tuck the thing back in under me now and then. Do you find that the straps allow enough room to turn over yet keep the sides under you?

3" of loft is impressive. What grade and amount of down did you wind up using? How did the finished weight come out? What materials did you use for the shell and baffles?

I don't know that I would have used the full 12 oz of down I got from Thru-Hiker but I do wish I had used a bit more in the foot end. The fact that mine doesn't have a true closed foot box lends itself to some loss of heat. I suppose I could make a down "plug" but just haven't found it really necessary to this point. One thing I do like about the open foot box is being able to just use the thing like a blanket. I've done that on several occasions and when Momma comes along, which is usually only when its above 50 deg, we'll just leave it open and spread it over both of us, though she usually winds up with the whole thing. That's in addition to the lightweight Lafuma synthetic bag she carries! I can't win.

All in all, I love mine but I gotta say that yours looks like a piece of artwork! Incredible!

Elastic in the straps maybe? Give you the room to move, but pulls the quilt back into place?

I tried an underquilt in my hammock that was set up like that. Way less constrictive than one without.
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  #17  
Old 01-05-2015, 05:14 PM
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philman philman is offline
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Backpack: MYOG Cuben, Osprey Atmos 65 AG
Sleeping Gear: MYOG Down Quilt, Enlightened Equipment Accomplice
Shelter: SMD Deschutes CF Tarp, SMD Lunar Duo
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Alton, Illinois
Posts: 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
Elastic in the straps maybe? Give you the room to move, but pulls the quilt back into place?

I tried an underquilt in my hammock that was set up like that. Way less constrictive than one without.

That's kinda what I was thinking. I'm starting to back off a bit on the gram weenie stuff when it comes down to a choice of practicality vs weight (sorry, I'm slow). An ounce for straps on the quilt or my rear end hangin' out in the cold? Hmmm...
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  #18  
Old 01-05-2015, 09:06 PM
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striker striker is offline
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Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Gregory Jade 38
Sleeping Gear: MYOG down quilt
Shelter: Bilgy Tarp Tent
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: AZ
Posts: 35
Thanks for the kind words about the bag I am so flattered!

I used the Thru Hiker kit with Pertex for the shell, Momentum for the liner, and their no see um for the baffles. The down is 850 fill activ-dry with the overfill so close to 15-16 ounces of down. I made the baffles 3 inches and I overstuffed a tad so the measured loft is about 3.25 inches. I am a smallish lady but I used ALL the down and almost all of the fabric. Total weight without the straps is 27 ounces and I would say this is about as warm for me as a standard 10 degree mummy bag -- I sleep very cold so this is what I was going for. I am not really into the super ultra light deal and went for some comfort here within reason but I think that's a good number for what I consider to be extreme luxury.

How I did the straps is I used some clips, i think they are suspender clips, and sewed some on the bags and put some on elastic straps to go around my pad - I just sewed those in a loop using a box-x anchor pattern. There are some close ups in my photo gallery on the synthetic bag. Getting the correct tension on the elastic is the hardest part, but it seems to be effective at keeping the bag in place as I move around while still giving some wiggle room. You can move the clips around on the straps to keep them close together under you. Not the lightest solution but fine and I have been satisfied enough not to mess with it. I have found that it doesn't matter all that much because if I am super cold, I just zip up. I bring them maybe 20% of the time, mostly I just use it like a quilt.

I totally get the footbox versus convertible shape debate. I went back and forth and decided that I was going for a super warm down bag and I wanted a foot box. I find that it helps to anchor the bag as I toss and turn. BUT if I were doing a warmer weather quilt I'd probably try your way for flexibility. How warm would you say it is comfortable to when its open like a blanket? What is the loft? Can you compare the 950 and 850 fp down? I haven't seen both.

For the Mrs, it sounds like she might sleep cold?? If so, I would definitely go a bit oversized. I am very comfortable if I can pull it up over my head and it is very luxurious to have a bunch of extra down in the foot area. I love having that baffle across the top too, it was a little tricky but I like having the semi hood. Have you considered making your quilts attachable? I thought about this for the husband and I and then it seemed complicated and I gave up.

Last edited by striker : 01-05-2015 at 09:07 PM. Reason: added link
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  #19  
Old 01-05-2015, 10:14 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
philman philman is offline
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Backpack: MYOG Cuben, Osprey Atmos 65 AG
Sleeping Gear: MYOG Down Quilt, Enlightened Equipment Accomplice
Shelter: SMD Deschutes CF Tarp, SMD Lunar Duo
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Alton, Illinois
Posts: 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by striker
How I did the straps is I used some clips, i think they are suspender clips, and sewed some on the bags and put some on elastic straps to go around my pad - I just sewed those in a loop using a box-x anchor pattern. There are some close ups in my photo gallery on the synthetic bag. Getting the correct tension on the elastic is the hardest part, but it seems to be effective at keeping the bag in place as I move around while still giving some wiggle room. You can move the clips around on the straps to keep them close together under you. Not the lightest solution but fine and I have been satisfied enough not to mess with it. I have found that it doesn't matter all that much because if I am super cold, I just zip up. I bring them maybe 20% of the time, mostly I just use it like a quilt.

Nicely done!

Quote:
Originally Posted by striker
How warm would you say it is comfortable to when its open like a blanket?

I would guess around 45 deg. or so for me. But that would be with a Cap 2 layer on. I'm by no means an expert on how bag/quilt ratings are derived but I'm factoring in a base layer of that weight for a "comfortable rating". Looking back on it, I said it was ok down to 28 deg. (closed up) with a Cap 3 layer on. In my mind ok now means I survived! When we hit the AT shortly after that there were some nights in the mid 30's and I wound up using my synthetic jacket to get nice and cozy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by striker
What is the loft?

Just under 2".

Quote:
Originally Posted by striker
Can you compare the 950 and 850 fp down? I haven't seen both.

I went with the un-treated 900 fp so I can't say.

Quote:
Originally Posted by striker
For the Mrs, it sounds like she might sleep cold?? If so, I would definitely go a bit oversized. I am very comfortable if I can pull it up over my head and it is very luxurious to have a bunch of extra down in the foot area. I love having that baffle across the top too, it was a little tricky but I like having the semi hood.

She is a cold sleeper. Sometimes she comes to bed looking like the Stay Puft Marshmallow man because she's got so many layers on! Thus the quilt. What you've done seems like it would be ideal for her. I think it would certainly lower the range at which she would feel comfortable going along.

Quote:
Originally Posted by striker
Have you considered making your quilts attachable? I thought about this for the husband and I and then it seemed complicated and I gave up.

I thought about it but came to the same conclusion. With the taper of each quilt I don't know how effective it would be. Still under consideration though!
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  #20  
Old 01-08-2015, 09:11 AM
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striker striker is offline
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Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Gregory Jade 38
Sleeping Gear: MYOG down quilt
Shelter: Bilgy Tarp Tent
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: AZ
Posts: 35
Yeah, for attaching quilts I think it would be much easier if you have simply tapered quilts that can open up flat. I had considered doing something like putting a few spot of velcro or something on one side of each of the quilts so that I could connect them but have them overlap slightly to help with the offset from the taper. The other option I considered was using some sort of spacer that would attach to both and potentially make a footbox but that seemed like one of those DIY ideas that could go horribly wrong haha.

That is quite a good level of warmth for that weight!! I think that is what I will shoot for for my next project. I need both a warm weather synthetic and down quilt, right???
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