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General Gear Discussion The General Gear Discussion forum is for the discussion of traditional and lightweight (ultralight) backpacking gear that is not covered in other Practical Backpacking™ forums. [Please post about Backpacks, Shelters, Sleeping Gear, Backcountry Kitchen (Food, Stoves) in those respective forum areas.]


View Poll Results: Which do you most often use for your backpacking drinking water?
Bottles 29 38.16%
Bladder 13 17.11%
Both on same trip 34 44.74%
Voters: 76. You may not vote on this poll

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  #11  
Old 09-25-2013, 11:12 PM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
I carry my bottle in one of these OR bottle carriers. I hang it from a backpack shoulder strap, so that it slides down to the "V" where the bottom of the pack strap meets the bottom of the pack suspension. That way it rides exactly where a classic canteen would, but I can slide the bottle holder up the strap to get at the bottle any time I want. No reaching around behind, no taking the pack off if I don't want to.

Real interesting survey. So far, no one carries a bladder without a bottle too. I wouldn't have guessed that.
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  #12  
Old 09-27-2013, 05:00 AM
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tonto tonto is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 471
Hiking With An Empty Bladder

Did I tell you I'm a cheap guy?
I refuse to purchase any expensive gear from an outfitter if it can be avoided.
On the trail I take 2 one liter Aqua Fina bottles to treat my water with Aqua Mira.
I also carry a 24 once Gatorade bottle with twist sports top for flavoring water.
While hiking, in my pack I carry an empty 3.5 liter bladder from a wine box.
Occasionally, I'll put a litter or 2 in the bladder to get through a long dry section of trail.
But mostly, I'm hiking on an empty bladder and it's used to tank up at the end of the day in camp.
The best part is everything was super cheap and cheap to replace too.
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  #13  
Old 09-27-2013, 02:58 PM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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Backpack: GoLite Pinnacle
Sleeping Gear: Moonstone Lucid 800 w/Neo Air pad
Shelter: Tarptent Sublite Tyvek & Tarptent Double Rainbow
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Texas
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I also use the bladders from a wine box. As far as I'm concerned, wine in the box beats Jack in the Box any time!
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  #14  
Old 10-08-2013, 10:13 AM
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Wilder Wilder is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Oregon
Posts: 48
I carry both, but only one.

I've used bottles called Chugsters for years. They come in various sizes and are more rectangular than round, which I prefer. They're light and cheap. They have a round screw-on cap which has a snap-open 9/16 inch drinking hole, so it's easy to fill, convenient for pouring and drinking. Graduated in milliliters on one side, ounces on the other. The one I carry is about 9x3x3.25 inches and holds a liter.

But as time went by, I began to envy the guys who can sip while walking with no fuss. I read bladder reviews and found them inconclusive.

So I did this. Find the right sized rubber stopper, drill a hole in it, shove in some tubing, thread the tubing in one bladder tube slit into the pack and out the other slit, secure the sipping end to a strap with velcro.

In bladder mode, the bottle sits in a side pocket with the stopper in the drinking hole. When I reach camp, the stopper comes out, the snap-on lid is closed and we're in bottle mode.

Also, like Grandpa, I've found box wine bladders to be the best compressible water carriers I've encountered.

Hey tonto...

Sorry, I accidentally left you out as a wine bladder brother. Please forgive me.

Last edited by Wilder : 10-08-2013 at 10:43 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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  #15  
Old 10-18-2013, 09:53 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
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I tend to use bottles for a variety of reasons - some of which have been expressed in this thread.

There are times that I've used hydration bladders, when somewhat hands-free drinking was beneficial.

Reality
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  #16  
Old 10-31-2013, 02:29 PM
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KalalauRich KalalauRich is offline
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Backpack: Go Lite Pinnacle
Sleeping Gear: Coolmax blanket and bliss nylon sleep sack
Shelter: Triple bliss hammock
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Oahu, Hawaii
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It is very rare for me to carry a bladder to consume water while I hike. I generally use plastic bottles. However on my last backpacking trip, I decided
to use my Camelbak 100 ounce bladder. Fortunately I brought a liter plastic
bottle too because soon after starting the hike, the bladder began to leak. I may have consumed only half the contents and ran out of water very early on the hike.

Unfortunately there was no water for miles. It was a very strenuous hike. I was wearing a polar heart rate monitor. My average heart rate over the 5 hours that I hiked was 152. I am over 50 and am fortunate that my cardiovascular condition is excellent. I was also fortunate that someone shared their water with me or I might not be posting this as my degree of dehydration was severe.

Needless to say, I will not be carrying a bladder again.

Aloha,

Kalalau Rich
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  #17  
Old 11-01-2013, 11:33 PM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by KalalauRich
...soon after starting the hike, the bladder began to leak. I may have consumed only half the contents and ran out of water very early on the hike.
Welcome to the forum, sorry to hear of your misfortune with the Camelbak. I think it's pretty rare for these to fail, though not unheard of. I'm curious if you were able to determine where the leak came from? Was it a bladder puncture, a hose leak, or did the bladder/hose connection fail?

Glad it turned out well. Running out of water isn't fun. I ran out of water once, and will never let it happen again as long as I can help it.
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  #18  
Old 11-02-2013, 08:28 AM
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KalalauRich KalalauRich is offline
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Backpack: Go Lite Pinnacle
Sleeping Gear: Coolmax blanket and bliss nylon sleep sack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GGervin
I'm curious if you were able to determine where the leak came from? Was it a bladder puncture, a hose leak, or did the bladder/hose connection fail?


That is the million dollar question. When I got home, I filled up the bladder,
hung it up and it did not leak. I squeezed it and it did not leak. But the thing was leaking like a sieve when I was hiking. And after our group got to our destination, one member of my group took my Camelbak to fill up in a stagnant pond, came back and told me it was leaking badly. It is still a mystery because I cannot get it to leak now.
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  #19  
Old 11-02-2013, 01:49 PM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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I think Murphy got wedged into a seal or connection somewhere. He only does that on the trail where he can create the most havoc. I can never get my truck to run rough for the mechanic either.
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  #20  
Old 11-02-2013, 11:20 PM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
Seems like Murphy's always involved... Usually in cahoots with Gumperson ("The probability of any given event is inversely proportional to its desireability").

I wonder if the top opening was sealed properly. The only thing I could think of that would make a disappearing mystery leak like that would be a problem with the top plug (the old ones like mine snapped in place, the new ones screw in). If that wasn't sealed properly, I have no doubt pressure against the bladder from inside the pack would force water out the top and create a "mystery" leak. I'd think a puncture leak or a bladder/hose fit problem would continue to leak or get worse. Just a guess. Maybe not an important one, since you don't seem real enthusiastic about bladders anymore anyway.

I personally carry most of my gear in waterproof stuff sacks inside the pack to defend against disaster leaks or other such water problems.
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