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Hammocks The Hammocks forum is for the discussion of backpacking hammocks and related sleep systems.


View Poll Results: Do you primarily prefer a cord or webbing suspension?
Cord 15 39.47%
Webbing 23 60.53%
Voters: 38. You may not vote on this poll

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  #21  
Old 03-08-2011, 09:52 PM
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Buffaloscout Buffaloscout is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2007
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I use cord. I need to try webbing some time just to see what it is like.

'scout
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  #22  
Old 03-24-2011, 08:34 PM
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architect architect is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 55
“ Whoopies don’t need no sticking knot”

The points made in this thread seem to be:

Malfunction
Safety
Weight
Convenience
Versatility

Lets assume we don’t want to damage tress and take wrapping 7/64” cord around a tree off the table.

I don’t look at this as one or the other choice.

Malfunction:
Using a whoopie sling (cord) forces you to use a tree strap (webbing). The chose is then all webbing or some webbing. My research on the subject reveled that the AmSteel Blue whoopie sling is the clear favorite cord. Using a whoopie sling in the winter (while I have not done it) does not doom you if it freezes up. Along with the AmSteel Blue the Marlin spike is the predominate method to join the whoopie sling to the tree straps, so not being able to adjust the sling durnig take down does not doom you. You simply unhook it. Whether that sling will warm up in time for the next hang later that day is up for debate. But, worst case scenario you can adjust the position of the marlin spike and you are back in business.

Safety/Weight
Cord/webbing selection is paramount for safety. Polyester seatbelt webbing is rated to 3000 pounds. It’s low stretch, UV resistant, Mildew resistant, abrasion resistant and a little heavy. It’s the Cadilac of webbing. There are lighter versions with half the rating. So going all in with webbing will incur a weight penalty. To off set the weight penalty the whoopie sling is used. AmSteel 7/64 is rated to 1600 pounds and splicing it to a sling derates it 40% to 960 pounds. 24 feet of it will cost you 38 grams. Compare that to 24 feet of webbing at 216 grams.
So blend of webbing and cord make for a safe light combination.

Quote:
Magic Number 30 degrees
Why are you advised to set up the suspension at that angle. Comfort? maybe, Safety Yes!. The 30 degree angle is the lowest angle that allows the weight of you in the hammock to pull out from the trees at the same force. If you weigh 200 pounds, that’s 200 pounds on each suspension. 90 degrees would split your weight (like a swing). Pass that 30 degree mark and the forces go up fast. A 15 degrees almost 400 pound on each strap. At 5 degrees the forces are 1146 pound and pop there goes the sling and cheaper polyesters.

Convenience
Wrapping a full webbing suspension or a tree strap, around a tree, is about the same. The convenience factors into the equation with the final adjustments. Looking for the magic 30 degrees. Sliding a webbing in buckles and sliding a sling is about the same. The only difference is the knot required for webbing. “ Whoopies don’t need no sticking knot”. If you tie cord without a sling it will take even longer.

Versatility
I designed my groups rig to use 9 foot webbing tree hugger to accommodate a near 3 foot diameter tree. My sling ranges from 1.4 to 6.8 feet. That is a lot of versatility not easily achieved in a webbing only suspension. Carrying 22 feet of webbing is heavy and bulky. Finally if you are going to familiar parts, and know the tree diameters in advance you could bring smaller tree straps, say 3-4 feet. This would seriously reduce your bulk and weight. You would never consider cutting down your webbing only suspension. So separates usually do add more versatility because you bring what you need for the trip.
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  #23  
Old 03-24-2011, 09:50 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Getting out and actually using various suspension systems helps to shape one's preferences.

I know that I've always preferred cord, but I now use webbing. [But I still give three cheers for knots -- they will always be of great use and closely tied (no pun intended) to master outdoor enthusiasts and their wilderness endeavors.]

People have been using cordage since hammocks have been in existence. While there's no real need to re-invent the wheel, simple tree-protecting efforts have merit (to which many agree).

Personally, I dislike whoopie slings (but that's just my feelings - based upon my many years of experience). I'm able to easily set up a hammock with no hassle, and I find absolutely nothing that they can do for me that I cannot do to my liking without them.

Many change their mind, once they depend on a particular system for some time -- especially things that are merely novelty or of peer-generated value. Whatever works for them is what's best. I, personally, enjoy it when people come to their own place of contentment with their choices.

For me, one of the major principles of modern backpacking/hammocking is simplicity - especially when I can do something just as good or perhaps better without the addition of some device or additional construction/effort.

I realize that some feel like they need more to set up a hammock - e.g. to get the "sag" right - but, for many, time and experience takes care of this. We are all at different stages. And that's OK.

Have fun with rope or webbing or both - and even whatever slings that are needed/desired.

Thanks to all for the continued participation in the question-topic of this thread and the poll.

Reality
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  #24  
Old 03-14-2012, 01:55 PM
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Landofrath Landofrath is offline
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I have tried several things but in the end I converted my Hennessy over to Warbonnet webbing suspension. I just feel safer with a good strap than I do with a 1/4" thick cord, its Just piece of mind for me. I also like that I can find other uses for the strap and carabiners.
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  #25  
Old 03-14-2012, 02:48 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Years ago I would have never imagined that webbing would become such a useful part of my kit. But when I take the hammock these days, webbing comes along.

I suppose if tree protection didn't come into play, I may have never bothered with webbing.

I could revert to using cord and some sort of tree sleeves, if the occasion arises.

Reality
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  #26  
Old 11-26-2012, 06:36 AM
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Beanie Beanie is offline
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I use lightweight 1" Poly webbing around the trees and 7/64" Dyneema to the hammock with a hook instead of a Biner. This has saved about 450grams from my previous setup and quite a bit of volume in my pack. As a back up I carry a length of cord and a couple of biners in my pack. Not a lot of volume or weight
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  #27  
Old 12-26-2012, 04:43 PM
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Kodiak Kodiak is offline
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Backpack: REI but just got a Gorrilla Backpack from Gossemer Gear
Shelter: WBBB Hammock with WB/SuperrFly in winter And Hennessy in summer
 
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I use whoppie slings on my Hennesy because its lighter and straps on Warbonnet Blackbird if it was just the hammock the straps are faster but after I put on tarp. Hennesy setup is faster.
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  #28  
Old 01-11-2013, 05:45 PM
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Richtorfla Richtorfla is offline
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I like the webbing that's on my blackbird. I also still have the stock suspension on my hennessey. I still think the figure 8 is still the neatest thing! Got pretty quick using the 8's, but like the ease of the warbonnet web suspension. Overall webbing for me wins out. No tree straps to lose. I'll take the weight penalty as others will not.
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  #29  
Old 06-27-2015, 06:38 PM
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Robislookin Robislookin is offline
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Backpack: 55L molle pack
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here in florida you have to use a 2" webbing at the state parks.
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  #30  
Old 06-29-2015, 06:29 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robislookin
here in florida you have to use a 2" webbing at the state parks.

just for the tree wrapping i hope.

i mean, i can dig suspension so wide you can walk on it...


years later, and i'm still a straps kind of guy. the cargo straps i started using oh what, three or four years ago are still kicking strong. they're fantastic.
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