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Backcountry Kitchen The Backcountry Kitchen forum is for the discussion of food and cooking gear related topics for backpacking trips (e.g. menus, recipes, stoves, fuel...).


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  #1  
Old 02-09-2015, 08:35 PM
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Beamshot Beamshot is offline
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Alcohol stove to pair with Stanley cookpot

I currently use a Bud Light aluminum bottle stove with my Stanley cookpot but was wondering if there might be a better pairing? ( More efficient stove to pair with cookpot?)
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  #2  
Old 02-10-2015, 05:48 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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I've been thinking on this as I've thought about getting one for my son.

A red bull stove if you're feeling like going pressurized could work especially if you put the jets on the inside. A chimney type stove would do the trick.
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Old 02-11-2015, 08:58 PM
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Beamshot Beamshot is offline
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I want to keep away from needing a pot stand if at all possible.
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Old 02-11-2015, 11:38 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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take a look at the cyclone stove. Its a narrow flame stove with a built in stand. Very cool looking and quite hot.

Stand less alcohol stove use with a pot as narrow as the Stanley pot is tough. There are a few out there though. Good luck.
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  #5  
Old 02-12-2015, 12:50 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Most of the efficiency regarding an alcohol stove has to do with harnessing and focusing the heat on the pot.

I've tested and used plenty of alcohol stoves - some more elaborate than others. While the stove design plays a role in efficiency in relation to a certain pot (e.g. pot diameter), a stove certainly won't change the actual properties of alcohol.

A Caldera Cone system harnesses and focuses the heat from an alcohol stove quite well. I've tested the Caldera with fancy alcohol stoves and a simple bottle cap (in lieu of stove), and the bottle cap performed just as good or better. This demonstrated the importance of effectively utilizing the heat over the (elaborate) stove design.

While there are other variables (metal type,...), getting the heat close enough to efficiently spread the flames across the bottom of the pot - without being too close to impede the flames is big factor. Containing as much of that heat as possible with a Caldera Cone or windscreen (...) is crucial.

Some stove designs might not blossom the flames out enough for the pot, while others may go too wide causing the flames to travel up the sides of the pot (which proved OK at times with the Caldera).

I haven't used that Stanley pot, so I'm unsure which factors might come into play (e.g. diameter, metal type, thickness,...).

I apologize that I can't be specific. I hope that someone with that pot will share her or his experience using it with alcohol stoves.

Reality
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Old 02-13-2015, 09:58 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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For reference the Stanley pot is stainless, a fairly narrow/tall pot similar in rough shape to the snow peak 700. Capacity is about 20-24 ounces.

From hands on play the steel is about average for backpacking. Sturdy without being overly thick(thinner than home kitchen cookware). I'd say the base is about... Four, maybe five inches across. The lid is decently fitting with steam vents. It'll work great with stoves like a gigapower or raptor or crux.

Good point, Reality, on the caldera cone. Forgot all about it. The Stanley pot is 99%+ stainless, the only plastic is the tab on the lid for lifting. It can easily take the heat on a caldera. I would recommend using the internal potstands(stakes) with a cone stove.

Another option would be look into the esbit/trangia stove/stand. Its integrated and works well, light, and sturdy. Gives you a solid fuel backup option too.

I've been very seriously considering this pot, if you can't tell. It'd be a solid starter level pot with a good price point and rock solid for use by a kid too.
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Old 02-14-2015, 01:01 AM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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I have a White Box stove which I have used on a few trips. I also have the Stanley pot, which has become my usual cook pot.

I pair the Stanley with a Giga Power, and it works O.K. I use the Stanley because I can keep my emergency survival kit in it, and it fits in the "possibles bag" I always keep with me on trips, so it functions as a dual purpose cooking container. The Stanley's steel and its shape makes it great for boiling water over a camp fire, where the flames can lick up it's sides and help heat the water.

But the Stanley's tall shape with a small surface area bottom works against it's being super efficient in heating water on a stove. Most of the heat from a stove is transferred through the pot's bottom - not it's sides, so a bigger bottomed shorter pot means more efficient heat transfer. I think it takes me a good minute or minute and a half more to boil 20 - 22oz of water in the Stanley than in a GSI tea kettle (from informal timing in the field). I've experimented with home made heat exchangers to increase the heating efficiency of the Stanley over the Giga power, and they just don't help that much. Maybe 30 seconds faster if I'm lucky.

There's really only one time all this is important, and that's if you are short on fuel. That's rare when I have the Giga power with me, since cannister size forces me to carry more fuel than I need. But with the alky stove, the picture's different. I tend to carry only what fuel I need, probably pre-measured to the ounce. There, pot efficiency becomes much more important.

You asked about a better stove for the pot. You could go at it the other way around if you like the alky stove. I bought the kettle specifically to work with the alky stove, and it works real well. A very efficient combo. 2oz of alcohol will bring 24oz or more of water in the GSI just fine. I haven't tried the Stanley with the White Box, and I probably won't because of my observations of it's boiling speed vs. the GSI kettle. If you're looking for a more efficient pot, look at the shape and size of the GSI kettle and find something like that.

I would be curious to hear details of your use of the Stanley with an alky stove. How much water were you boiling, and how many oz of fuel did you need to get it to boil?

Last edited by GGervin : 02-14-2015 at 01:17 AM.
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  #8  
Old 02-15-2015, 08:45 PM
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Beamshot Beamshot is offline
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With my alcohol stove I would say it took about 9 minutes to boil 20 or so ounces with 1.5 to 2 ounces of fuel. Im really not to concerned with it but just wondering what other options are out there.
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  #9  
Old 02-16-2015, 04:35 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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What type of wind screen are you using? Efficiency can be increased there, using a taller and closer fitting screen. You can also improve it by adjusting overall airflow through the cook system.

As for stove options run a search on cyclone alcohol stoves they're a chimney type that has really effective fuel vapor/air mixing for the hottest possible burn. With such a narrow pot and your stated desire to avoid a separate stand(not a bad choice, simple is attractive in many ways) you are limited in your choices.

I think you might well be using a pretty optimal stove already. So if you want to bump efficiency you can turn to changing other parts of your cook system. Improve the windscreen, add a heat exchanger, have a reflective ground plate, things like that.

A semi pressurized side burner like you're using is really simple and rugged. Better with wider pots. A central flame is best for a narrow pot like you have, but there's not many out there that are usable without a pot stand.

I'd say, show us the rest of the system(or tell us) and we can see if there are some tuning that can bring up the efficiency without making things too complicated.
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  #10  
Old 02-17-2015, 08:22 AM
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Beamshot Beamshot is offline
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I do have a windscreen that I can use but given time wasn't with windscreen use! But I haven't even considered a reflective ground plate. Do you care to elaborate more on that? I really like the stove that im using so I think you are right in focusing on other areas for improvement.
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