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Sleeping Gear The Sleeping Gear forum is for the discussion of sleeping gear (bags, mats, quilts...).


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  #1  
Old 12-20-2013, 06:15 PM
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FirstRWD FirstRWD is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
Backpack: Detours 40L or Bike Panniers
Sleeping Gear: Homemade Synthetic Quilt
Shelter: North Face Mica FL 2
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: WI
Posts: 85
Any thoughts or experience regarding multi-temp bags?

I'm looking at a couple multi-temp bags, like the Kelty Tumbler 40/60. Does anyone have any experience with these bag systems, or even just thoughts to share based on general experience? I'm planning a trip in Europe for a few months next spring/summer and we'll be seeing a decent range of temps, though nothing down to freezing(hopefully). I've got an inflatable sleep pad, so that should help with bottom insulation as long as the bag itself works out.
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  #2  
Old 12-20-2013, 07:52 PM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
Sleeping Gear: Kelty LightYear Down 20 / ENO Doublenest Hammock
Shelter: Granite Gear White Lightnin' tarp
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Posts: 285
I'd advise you to look at the Kelty Galactic 30 if you're wanting a standard rectangular bag. Keep in mind that a rectangular bag takes more calories to heat up than a mummy and loses its heat faster because there is more surface area. So, temps in the 40's will likely require at minimum a 30 degree bag. Cloudloft does not impress me. Down is better.

I do own a Kelty down bag, a Lightyear 20, and have found the quality and utility of it very good for not a lot of money. All of the Kelty products I own are very good quality. No problem with the brand.

I just can't envision how a 40/60 synthetic is gonna' work for anything other than a sofa comforter, because it is too bulky, too heavy and frankly the temp rating is practically no rating at all.



Ben
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  #3  
Old 12-20-2013, 09:25 PM
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FirstRWD FirstRWD is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
Backpack: Detours 40L or Bike Panniers
Sleeping Gear: Homemade Synthetic Quilt
Shelter: North Face Mica FL 2
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: WI
Posts: 85
Thanks, Ben. The bulk is one thing I'm questioning. I've tried a mummy and I don't like feeling like someone bound me up at the feet, but I guess I can probably find a bag with some foot room that's still less bulky than this Kelty or the Eureka dual-temp I was looking at(a 30/50 degree bag). The only thing that concerns me about down is that I've never owned it and I've read so many times that if it gets moisture then you're just cold and out of luck. I'll be traveling for a few months and I don't want to find myself with a wet bag and no way to dry it in the middle of the trip. I'd rather play it safe and go synthetic, so I think I have to deal with some bulk.

Edit: Oh, and as for the temp rating, this is going to be a spring/summer bag, so I shouldn't need too much. I think I'd just sit in a puddle of sweat in a regular 20 degree bag or something like that.

Last edited by FirstRWD : 12-20-2013 at 09:28 PM.
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  #4  
Old 12-21-2013, 06:33 AM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
Sleeping Gear: Kelty LightYear Down 20 / ENO Doublenest Hammock
Shelter: Granite Gear White Lightnin' tarp
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Posts: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by FirstRWD
Thanks, Ben. The bulk is one thing I'm questioning. I've tried a mummy and I don't like feeling like someone bound me up at the feet, but I guess I can probably find a bag with some foot room that's still less bulky than this Kelty or the Eureka dual-temp I was looking at(a 30/50 degree bag). The only thing that concerns me about down is that I've never owned it and I've read so many times that if it gets moisture then you're just cold and out of luck. I'll be traveling for a few months and I don't want to find myself with a wet bag and no way to dry it in the middle of the trip. I'd rather play it safe and go synthetic, so I think I have to deal with some bulk.

Edit: Oh, and as for the temp rating, this is going to be a spring/summer bag, so I shouldn't need too much. I think I'd just sit in a puddle of sweat in a regular 20 degree bag or something like that.

Mindfulness, the most important piece of kit you can pack, can pretty much eliminate the possibility of a wet bag. You do have to be especially careful in heavy fog, of course, but otherwise I think most of those stories about wet down bags are the stuff of urban legend.

So I would go for less bulk, less weight.

Also, sweating in a bag can be effectively prevented by simply opening it up and using it as a quilt. A rectangular bag, as it is not hooded like a mummy, is especially good for this kind of use. This is why I would recommend selection of a bag rated for a lower temp than what you are expecting - it is far better to open up a lower temperature-rated bag on a warm night than shivering in a higher temperature-rated bag when it gets cold. Of course you can also just put on more clothes if it gets too cold for the bag, which is what we all do anyway. A 20 degree bag would seem to be overkill but a 30 might make some sense.

All that being said I really don't have any idea what temps you are expecting and offer these observations only for your consideration.



Ben
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  #5  
Old 12-21-2013, 10:16 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
honestly, the best way to have a multiple range bag is to go with what the US army did, and use layered bags. it can seem a little awkward at first but their sleep system is really useful.

i've actually been considering making an insulated over-bag to slip my ALPS bag into when it's REALLY cold.

as for a wet down bag, i think the few times i've seen it happen are when people slip and fall while fording a stream. this is prevented by packing your down bag in a dry bag, or even a plastic garbage bag.

there are semi-mummy bags out there, too.
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  #6  
Old 12-21-2013, 11:31 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
FirstRWD FirstRWD is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
Backpack: Detours 40L or Bike Panniers
Sleeping Gear: Homemade Synthetic Quilt
Shelter: North Face Mica FL 2
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: WI
Posts: 85
I've been looking at a lot of semi-mummy type options. All of them seem to keep tiny foot-box idea and just open up the top. I didn't mind the top of a mummy, though. It's having my feet all tangled and restricted feeling that I don't like. I guess I just move too much in my sleep.

In any case, I do remember mentions of the army's sleep system in my internet searches. I'll have to look into it more. Maybe that'll be my ticket to warmth through a decent temperature range during the trip(depending on weight and bulk). Thanks for the tip.
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