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Backcountry Kitchen The Backcountry Kitchen forum is for the discussion of food and cooking gear related topics for backpacking trips (e.g. menus, recipes, stoves, fuel...).


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  #1  
Old 11-26-2013, 10:52 PM
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Wildfield Wildfield is offline
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Uni-tasker vs Multi-tasker (mugs)

I purchased 2 mugs today.

The first could be a multi-tasker. Single wall means it can be used to heat water on a stove and/or be a vessel from which soup, tea or coffee can be consumed. It's the right size to contain a 4oz/110g iso-propane canister. It also happens to fit nicely into my Trek 900 pot. Weighs 3.2oz.



The second mug is a uni-tasker. Double wall means it will insulate hot and cold beverages. Can't be used to heat water and inside diameter is too small to hold an iso-propane canister. I really like the form, fit and function…but it's a one-trick pony. Weighs 4.2oz.



I'm thinking I really enjoy coffee and tea so in this case a relatively heavy uni-tasker is okay. Still, I don't sit around for any long period of time in the morning…make breakfast and coffee, eat/drink fast, clean up and get out of Dodge.

What kind of mug do you use and why?
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  #2  
Old 11-27-2013, 09:55 AM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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My brother in law has a double wall mug that I like for the fact it can be held without burning my hands and it's a little easier on the lips with hot liquid, however, I generally use my single wall one for the versatility (and price). I always have a pair of gloves with me and will wear those when drinking hot chocolate or coffee. I've also learned to sip carefully.
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  #3  
Old 11-27-2013, 02:12 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Good topic. I opt for a single wall mug. I can use various (already carried) things to insulate it, if needed.

And, for me, the single wall mug is more versatile.

Reality
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Old 11-27-2013, 09:30 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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double-wall is nice, very nice, in fact, but in practice I'm a single-wall kind of camper.

for the one, i like to not have to linger forever before i drink my hot beverage.
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Old 11-29-2013, 09:51 PM
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FirstRWD FirstRWD is offline
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I like to just slide a sock or something around my single walled cup. It keeps warm plenty long enough for me to drink my coffee or hot chocolate. I'm not much of a sipper, though. I tend to just drink things down. I also like to know that I can use my cup for heating water if I need to. I can definitely see the benefit of sitting around camp with a double wall on a cold night if you're sipping around a fire and maybe splash some scotch into that hot coffee.
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  #6  
Old 11-30-2013, 08:35 AM
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Wildfield Wildfield is offline
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Thank you for all the great feedback. I think I am leaning towards the single wall mug. I like that I can nest a fuel canister, stove and matches inside the cup, and the cup inside my cook pot. I also like that it can be used to heat water if need be. Also, on long, uphill climbs, I have found that my brain suddenly remembers things like, how much heavier my double wall cup, insulated air mattress, water filter, poly-carbonate water bottle and iso-butane fuel canister weigh…and why didn't I go for lighter options!
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Old 11-30-2013, 10:47 PM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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It's funny how my brain notes those same things primarily on climbs. I wonder why that is?
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Old 12-02-2013, 03:23 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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I quit the insulated cup some time ago, since I still need a cook pot anyway, and went with the one cup/pot setup, starting with a SP 600, then switching to an MSR Titan mug for a while. Finally, wishing for a coffee cup to sip on while the cookpot simmered, I broke down and got an SP mini solo combo kit with a 700 size cup nesting in a 10 fluid oz cup. This also nested my ti bushcooker stove. Then last year I got an SP900 kit with 5" fry pan lid (for the occasional mushroom saute or whatever) and nest my bushcooker stove and small ti cup inside it, which added an ounce and a bit more bulk to the kit.

Summary: 10 oz drinking cup, 30 oz cook pot, 5" fry pan, bushcooker esbit or wood stick cook stove, all nesting.

Best of all: the 28 oz cup will still nest with everything else inside the SP 900 pot/pan kit, adding capacity for more people or a 2 course meal.
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  #9  
Old 12-08-2013, 09:39 AM
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Wildfield Wildfield is offline
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Received both cups that I ordered. Both are very nicely made. Snow Peak seems to make very good quality gear. It was 43 degrees last night so I decided to cook outside in the backyard to experiment a little. First thing I did was brew coffee (single cup pour over). I brewed 2 cups - 1 in the Snow Peak Hotlips Titanium 600 Mug and 1 in the Snow Peak Titanium Double 450 Mug. Used Verve Streetlevel Espresso Roast beans (fyi). Also, cooked my dinner outside but that's more or less unrelated to the mugs.

Snow Peak Hotlips Titanium 600 Mug


Weight: 3.25 ounces with hotlips protector and mesh bag
Capacity: 21.2 ounces

Hotlips feature is nice, but I wouldn't use it. The silicone hot lips piece is one extra thing to lose, clean and worry about. Capacity is plenty large for coffee, even if you a want to make a "double dose". No problem to heat water up in this cup. One small isobutane canister nests in this cup but the seam at the bottom of canister prevents it from fitting all the way. You have to put the canister into the cup, upside down and the seam hangs up on the lip of the cup. Hot liquids cool pretty fast, especially in cold weather like last night.

Snow Peak Titanium Double 450 Mug


Weight: 4/375 ounces with mesh bag
Capacity: 14 ounces

Nice mug! 14 ounce capacity is much less than the Snow Peak Hotlips but still plenty for coffee, tea and soup. The insulating feature is very noticeably effective especially in cold weather. That's worth something since I enjoy hot beverages most when they are hot. This is a uni-tasker though in the sense that you cannot use it to heat liquids and not much nests in it. Still, I'm considering carrying this on my next outing, since it keeps things warmer longer.

Overall, I think for longer than a weekend type trip, it's hard to beat the small 10 oz mug that nests nicely with the cook pot of my Snow Peak Ti Mini Solo set. That set contains everything very compactly including stove, small isobutane canister, matches and MSR igniter.

Having said that, knowing the fine insulating functionality of the one-trick-pony Snow Peak Ti Double 450, I'm sure there will be times I wish would have carried the extra ounces.
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  #10  
Old 12-18-2013, 06:44 AM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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I'm on the single-wall side of the house.

A "cozy" solves the insulation problem with no weight penalty and you can make one out of a windshield sunscreen (silver-backed) with just a pair of scissors and some duct tape. Cut, tape the edges together to make a sleeve, fold it flat and stow it where it won't get wrecked. Both my Ti mug, and my 2 quart (yes, that's right, 2 quart, I said that, not an error) pot are fitted with these sleeves. They work very well, no complaints, re-purpose, re-use, recycle.

Going on 3 years with these things and I am happy with 'em.

Double-wall mugs just always seem kinda' ridiculous to me, actually. But then I take a pretty dim view of fluffy marketing initiatives. Generally I find that the most useful, and delightful if I may here use that '90's term, gee-whiz-golly-it-works ideas come not out of a cube farm but out of my own head. Which is also the seat of all folly as well, of course, but hey, you gotta' start somewhere.



Ben
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