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Wilderness Photography The Wilderness Photography forum is for the discussion of photography (videography) gear, experience, and technique as it directly relates to wilderness photography. PBF members may also post self-owned photos that have been uploaded to the PB Gallery or as post attachments. Offsite links and offsite photos are prohibited. Please see ("sticky") instructional post located at top of threads.


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  #31  
Old 08-16-2007, 07:53 PM
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NorCalCamper NorCalCamper is offline
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Hi, I recently purchased an XShot.

Quote:
XShot is the essential travel accessory. Every compact digitial camera owner can benefit from it! Whether you're traveling, on the beach with a loved one, hiking in the mountains, rock climbing, on a cruise, or just around the house with the family, now you can be in the picture too! XShot is a great accessory for taking cool videos too! Just spin around with the XShot and you'll get an awesome 3D like video.


mediaimg_7_big.jpg

It's a cool product, pretty light and compact. One downside, since it telescopes your camera tripod connection needs to be in the middle of the camera for even weight distribution. Unlike my FujiFilm x30. :(
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  #32  
Old 08-25-2007, 06:35 PM
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Miner Miner is offline
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I like the Ultrapod. Using the velcro, I sometimes attach it to the handle of my hiking pole which allows me to use it like a monopod and I guess you could use it like that in a similar way as that xshot thing.

Lately, I've been thinking about those water bottle cap camera adaptors (or a DIY version) as for some pictures they would probably work well for (just not on an uneven surface). Certainly can't beat the <= 1oz weight of them.
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  #33  
Old 09-01-2007, 08:14 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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For those thinking about a getting a Gorillapod - some of them come packaged with a bottle cap pod too.



Reality
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  #34  
Old 09-02-2007, 09:14 AM
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roverboy roverboy is offline
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I've got the Gorillapod. I've used it on the last two trips and like it.
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  #35  
Old 09-02-2007, 04:06 PM
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Quoddy Quoddy is offline
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Tripod

I've been using a Joby Gorillapod for almost a year now. Light, compact, and easy to use in almost every situation. All of those photos of me on the trail you might see were taken using it (including my avitar).
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  #36  
Old 07-27-2009, 09:08 PM
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yippikiyo yippikiyo is offline
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My New Tripod / Camera Extender

This little guy is light both in the pack and on the wallet- found at Bed, Bath and Beyond for $10 and seen online as well. It worked very well as a tripod and the bendable legs allow it to be wrapped around the end of my trekking pole and used as a camera extender for those solo shots. It's nice to avoid those fish-eye-looking photos I usually get.

Here it is without the iPhone holder adapter. It's about 6 inches long


And here is a photo of me at GUMO taken with the tripod used as extender.


yippikiyo
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  #37  
Old 07-30-2009, 07:02 PM
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cknighton cknighton is offline
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Wish I had the brand name... I received something like a Gorillapod some years ago as a gift, and it actually holds up to my metal-body FM2 and a 70mm-210mm zoom lens. Once in a while the legs start deforming a bit under the weight, but I've been surprised often how stable it is. Never tried wrapping it around a tree though. The legs are stiff enough that that probably won't work. Will post the brand/model if I can determine it.

Something I do with the digital pocket camera is skip the tripod and just use whatever is handy. Place it on a rock then use a pebble, a bit of web strap, a pencil, anything the right height to prop the body at an angle and point the lens where I want it. You'd be surprised how little that height may be. (This won't cut it if you're shooting into treetops, but for a trailside timer portrait or long exposure of the landscape, it often works well.)

Last edited by cknighton : 07-30-2009 at 07:07 PM.
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  #38  
Old 03-17-2010, 01:59 PM
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tenthumbs tenthumbs is offline
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Tripod suggestions?

Hello everyone. Anyone here hike with a tripod for use with a DSLR camera? Something lighter in weight of course but still able to handle the larger DSLR type camera (I have a Pentax Kx). This would be for weekend trip use so a little added weight won't kill me. Now that I've graduated to the DSLR I would love to get some quality pics that my P&S can't produce.

Thanks!
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  #39  
Old 04-30-2010, 10:43 AM
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Miner Miner is offline
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Recently, I discovered an 11oz fullsize tripod that weighs 11oz called a Zipshot. The legs look to be alum. tent poles with the shock cord holding them together. The legs thus set themselves up automatically once they are set free. However, the tripod isn't that stable. TO use for photos, you really have to use the self-timer or a remote to avoid shaking. For static shots/video it works well. In really strong winds, you will get some shaking in video or long exposures. There is no work around as its the legs flexing that causes it. I haven't decided if this is going to be a long term item that I'll carry. I will admit that it has been nice having a tall tripod for use with my camcorder again when I backpack.


Lately, instead of my ultrapod, I've been playing with using a gatoraid bottle lid with a 1/4" screw added. Into that I screw a Slik SBH-60 ball head. The whole thing is about 2oz. Screwing this onto a full water bottle gives really good support, even if the surface is on an angle. And its far faster to setup for a shot then a gorilla por or Ultrapod (I know those don't take much setup time, but the samll amount that they do I was finding that I was less willing to use them).
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  #40  
Old 04-30-2010, 11:07 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miner
Recently, I discovered an 11oz fullsize tripod that weighs 11oz called a Zipshot.
I've seen the Zipshot. It does the trick. Thanks for sharing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Miner
And its far faster to setup for a shot then a gorilla por or Ultrapod (I know those don't take much setup time, but the samll amount that they do I was finding that I was less willing to use them).
Of course, one of the main reasons people use a Gorillapod is for its ability to cling to trees and other objects. This feature surely comes in handy for many.

Reality
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