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Wilderness Photography The Wilderness Photography forum is for the discussion of photography (videography) gear, experience, and technique as it directly relates to wilderness photography. PBF members may also post self-owned photos that have been uploaded to the PB Gallery or as post attachments. Offsite links and offsite photos are prohibited. Please see ("sticky") instructional post located at top of threads.


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  #21  
Old 01-01-2007, 02:14 PM
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Sim Sim is offline
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I just ordered the middle size of the Joby Gorrillapod yesterday. Our camera of choice exceeds the weight capacity of the smallest/lightest model. I'll be taking it on a trip to Death Valley and the Red Rocks area in the middle of January. I'll attempt to do a simple review when we get back.

Steve
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  #22  
Old 04-25-2007, 06:12 AM
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wheatridger wheatridger is offline
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It's the age-old question: how to take a still picture with a camera that isn't?

I just saw a back issue of Popular Photography where someone suggested this lightweight tripod substitute: take 6 feet of light chain and attach it (somehow) to a 1/4-inch screw that fits the tripod socket of your camera. When you want to take a steady picture, let the chain dangle to the ground. Step on the end and pull the camera upwards, putting the chain under tension. It's worth a try.

For me, the whole game changed when I bought a Konica Minolta 7d, which has a stabilization system in the camera body. All my lenses are stabilized now, and seem good for exposures two stops slower than normal. I've taken sharp handheld pictures at 1/4 second with a 70 mm lens! Add the excellent high-ISO performance of modern DSLRs (there's little visible difference between 100 speed and 800), and the need for tripods is considerably reduced. The Sony A100 DSLR has this system, as do some recent Olympus and Pentax models. The weight you'll save leaving the tripod at home will more than make up the weight increase stepping up from a compact camera. Some compact digicams have stabilization too, but beware that they show plenty of noise above ISO 200 or so.

It's a long way from the days when color photos meant working with ISO 10-speed Kodachrome!
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  #23  
Old 04-26-2007, 11:04 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheatridger
It's the age-old question: how to take a still picture with a camera that isn't?

Good point. Although I think a lot of backpackers are using these lightweight tripods for more than image stablization.

It's often used as another hand/person - something to hold the camera while its owner gets in the shot (i.e. self-portrait). The Joby Gorillapod, for example, allows the camera to be held securely on a tree branch. So, image stablization yes, but also just to simply hold the camera to be able to even take the shot.

Reality
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  #24  
Old 04-27-2007, 02:58 AM
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Franco Franco is offline
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Both the Gorillapod and the Ultrapod are part of my arsenal. The Ultrapod is usually with me but the Gorillapod is more fun. Just before I left my job , I purchased a Velbon P Max, 900 g (32 oz) , the lightest relatively stable tripod that extends over 4', good enough for a 2kg (71 oz) camera.
Franco
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  #25  
Old 04-27-2007, 01:08 PM
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Harvest95 Harvest95 is offline
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I am going to be using a Manfrotto 3021BPRO tripod with a Manfrotto 3 way Pan and tilt head 804RC2 that weights total about 7lbs. This will support about 8 lbs. I will also cut down alot of camera shake with this set up, as I will be using a Canon 20D SLR and at times with a Tamron 200-500MM lens and sometimes with a 2X teleconverter.
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  #26  
Old 04-27-2007, 05:03 PM
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elevatn elevatn is offline
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Tripods

I recently picked up a Manfrotto 718b tripod which weighs about 3 pounds (it's a full size tripod). Much heavier than the ones mentioned previously, but with a DSLR the 718b is about the minimum you can get away with. Unfortunately the carbon fiber tripods are seriously expensive. If not for the price, I have myself a Gitzo.
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  #27  
Old 04-27-2007, 07:28 PM
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coloradokevin coloradokevin is offline
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I have a Canon SD700 camera (small point-shoot digital w/ 4x zoom). For my purposes the gorillapod has been wonderful. I bought the tripod to cover my self-portrait issues when solo hiking, and also use it quite often when hiking with the fiance. This thing attaches to nearly anything (trail signs, tree branches, rocks, dirt, etc.), and weighs virtually nothing (smallest size comes in at 1.4 oz if I recall correctly. cheap too (maybe $20?)
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  #28  
Old 04-28-2007, 10:47 AM
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WildlifeNate WildlifeNate is offline
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I made very good use of my Ultrapod this past week. I used it in the woods as an extra hand (like Reality mentioned) so that my wife and I could have pictures of BOTH of us on our anniversary trip. It really showed its usefulness inside Mammoth Cave, however. In order to get any sort of respectable photo, I had to use long exposure times (5-10 sec), and attempting to hold a camera still for that is silly at best. I used the ultrapod to set the camera on rocks, the ground, or tables...or even to attach the camera to handrails. The photos still aren't perfect (a little P&S just can't gather enough light to eliminate graininess in that situation), but they're good enough for wallpaper on my computer.

I may try out a gorillapod, though, because while the ultrapod is quite effective, attaching it to objects with the velcro strap takes more time than I'd like. The gorillapod looks like setup would be a bit quicker.
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  #29  
Old 04-28-2007, 11:50 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildlifeNate
I may try out a gorillapod, though, because while the ultrapod is quite effective, attaching it to objects with the velcro strap takes more time than I'd like. The gorillapod looks like setup would be a bit quicker.

I know what you mean. I prefer the Ultrapod at times for use on the ground, boulders, and other semi-smooth surfaces. However, the Gorillapod is great for attaching it to limbs and other objects.

Reality
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  #30  
Old 04-29-2007, 10:26 AM
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Mataharihiker Mataharihiker is offline
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I have an Ultrapod and a Gorillapod but my favorite is a full size Boden tripod I bought 15 years ago. I had asked for the lightest, full size tripod made and had been told the one I now have was being discontinued...it weighs 1 1/2 pounds so I don't often take it backpacking although I usually take it on dayhikes...
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