Practical Backpacking™ Forums

Welcome to Practical Backpacking™ Forums (PBF).

You are currently viewing PBF as a guest which has limited access. By becoming a PBF member, you will have full access to view and participate in tens of thousands of informative discussions, to view links and attachments (photos), and will gain access to other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free! Click to Become a PBF Member! Be sure to also explore the Practical Backpacking Podcast.


Go Back   Practical Backpacking™ Forums > Practical Backpacking™ General Outdoors (Backpacking Related) > Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills
HOME FAQ PBF GUIDELINES BLOG PODCAST GALLERY STORE CALENDAR Mark Forums Read

Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills The Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to ancient and/or primitive style bushcraft/wilderness skills (e.g. firecraft, foraging, natural material construction, modern/primitive tools, long-term wilderness survival,...).


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 12-30-2013, 02:06 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Wildfield Wildfield is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 131
Thank you again for your comments. I did a little more research yesterday and decided to order the following knife:



Seemed like a decent price and I have had very good luck with Buck knives over the past 30 years.

I'll try to post a review of it after I have a chance to use it.

Darryl
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 01-02-2014, 12:14 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
purplesherifftaylor purplesherifftaylor is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Junior Member
Backpack: Osprey Atmos 65
Sleeping Gear: Nunatak Alpinist 20
Shelter: 8 X 10 siltarp, or Lunar Solo, depending on conditions.
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
I do like the positive feel I get when sharpening a scandi as there is no guesswork to it at all. A scandi is also somewhat weaker than a secondary of course so you have to be a little more careful how you use the blade; chipping the edge is always a concern.

,

Ben

I learned my lesson the dumb way, by splitting some dry oak for kindling.

Some scandis are steeper than others, so maybe you can get away with batoning, using a knife with a >20 deg. inclusive edge. My scandis have all been the ones where you buy the blade and make a custom stick tang knife: Helle, Brusletto, Polar, Lauri, Mora. A lot of those have a shallower grind, so just be aware of what you are getting.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 01-03-2014, 01:35 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildfield
I did a little more research yesterday and decided to order the following knife... I'll try to post a review of it after I have a chance to use it.
Had a Buck myself for years, the "General," but decided I wouldn't carry it anymore, so I gave it to my brother.

I didn't like two things about it. One was stainless vs. the carbon I prefer now. Stainless has some good advantages, but it's brittle. Some people don't like the idea of battoning with a knife at all. For those who do, stainless isn't as ideal as a good carbon. The stainless blade edge is a little more likely to fracture during the impacts. The second issue was grind. I'd prefer a flat grind for battoning first, a scandi grind second, and maybe a convex grind a third choice. I don't think a hollow grind is as good for that. Hence my preference for my Heavy Bowie or my Bushlore.

But in comparing the Buck you ordered to the Seal Pup Elite, both are stainless, both are hollow ground, and both look to be about the same size. I bet the Buck will be a better performer. Plus, the Buck has a brass flat cap butt. You could do light hammering with it in a pinch (brass is soft, so not too much, dents would show up pretty quick). You'd never get away with that at all on the Seal Pup Elite's polypro handle. And your Buck is just plain prettier besides. I do look forward to a practical review of it from you.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 01-04-2014, 01:47 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Wildfield Wildfield is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by GGervin
I didn't like two things about it. One was stainless vs. the carbon I prefer now. Stainless has some good advantages, but it's brittle. Some people don't like the idea of battoning with a knife at all. For those who do, stainless isn't as ideal as a good carbon. The stainless blade edge is a little more likely to fracture during the impacts. The second issue was grind. I'd prefer a flat grind for battoning first, a scandi grind second, and maybe a convex grind a third choice. I don't think a hollow grind is as good for that. Hence my preference for my Heavy Bowie or my Bushlore.

Great information and feedback...thank you!

Battoning did not enter my mind as I thought about this knife...definitely a reflection of my lack of bushcraft knowledge and knife techniques in general.

I watched a couple videos on battoning with a knife.

In the boy scouts, I had done this before with a folding knife on small branches. Not knowing that battoning was a legitimate knife technique, I performed this method thinking if my dad sees me, he's going to yell at me for hitting my knife blade with this log.

As you mentioned, I too noticed the brass butt end of the knife handle and thought this would be a good tool for tapping tent pegs into the ground.

My curiosity is getting the best of me regarding the discussion about blades utilizing high carbon steel. I've ordered the Condor Bushlore from a seller on Amazon. I'm very curious to use the Condor side-by-side with the Buck for some comparison tests.

Thanks again for the comments. I am learning a lot from this discussion!

Last edited by GGervin : 01-05-2014 at 12:57 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 01-04-2014, 08:48 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildfield


My curiosity is getting the best of me regarding the discussion about blades utilizing high carbon steel. I've ordered the Condor Bushlore from a seller on Amazon. I'm very curious to use the Condor side-by-side with the Buck for some comparison tests.

there was a pretty interesting discussion on carbon steel somewhere in the gear section a while back. a lot of people like stainless for the maintenance, though carbon's got it's following.

i've had good stainless knives, but i notice you REALLY have to shell out for good stainless blades whereas good carbon steel can be had for relatively cheap.

i'm honestly getting to where i'm going to just bite the bullet and design my own knife. the knives here are great, no question. they've provided fantastic service to thousands of campers and hikers, no matter the material.

but dang if i'm not able to find a knife that has everything i want. sadly.

be wary, your curiosity may lead you down this same road.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 01-05-2014, 12:56 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildfield
In the boy scouts, I had done this before with a folding knife on small branches. Not knowing that battoning was a legitimate knife technique, I performed this method thinking if my dad sees me, he's going to yell at me for hitting my knife blade with this log.
Mors Kochanski wrote a book called "Bushcraft: Outdoor Skills and Wilderness Survival," which I learned about from others on this forum. He has some great info on bushcraft knife use, including battoning. He shows how to cut down a 3" diameter tree without chopping, using no more than a 4" bushcraft knife like the Mora and battoning. If you haven't read the book, I'm betting you'd like it.

In fact (and very much on topic for this thread), he has an excellent description of what he thinks the "ideal" bushcraft knife is. Very few descriptions in other authors are as practical, or as backed with bushcrafting experience as deep as his. I'd recommend it if you haven't read it yet.
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 01-08-2014, 04:33 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Wildfield Wildfield is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 131
Thx for the book recommendation...I've ordered it.

I received the Condor Bushlore today. Beautiful knife; much prettier in person than in photos...especially the handle.

This knife is definitely unlike any other knife I have ever owned. I guess to date, I've mostly owned stainless steel, hollow grind bladed knives. With the exception of a Japanese kitchen knife (used for cutting sashimi), I don't think I have never owned a carbon steel knife before.

The shape of the blade is interesting too...again, unlike anything I currently own. I guess it is a sabre grind (or maybe flat grind?). I can already see this design would be more durable for techniques like battoning.

I have a tree in the backyard that I have to prune this weekend. I'm going to do a little battoning on a couple of the larger branches, with both the Condor and Buck, just to see how they might perform. If anything interesting comes of it, I'll add a post explaining my observations.

Thanks again for all the info! This is fun!
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 01-17-2014, 02:03 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
immadman immadman is offline
Practical Backpacking™ New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 8
Guess I am a little old fashioned...outside of my yellow handled case trapper pocket knife, I carry and use my old Ka-bar USMC knife. Tough, easy to sharpen...you get the picture...
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 01-18-2014, 09:55 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Wildfield Wildfield is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 131
I tested the Buck and the Bushlore on a 1-1/2 inch to 2 inch diameter branch. I used a similar diameter branch like a mallet to batton the blade of the knives, to chop through the branches. I also tried a sort of hatchet like stroke to also chop at the branches. I was pretty careful with my battening and hatchet-like strokes, as I did not want to break or damage either of the blades.

Overall, both knives did pretty well. I feel like I can get a much sharper edge on the Buck (stainless steel) but it does feel more fragile (brittle) than the Bushlore. It seemed like the Buck held its edge better too. Having said that, I think the Bushlore could take much more punishment before sustaining any damage. The carbon steel blade seems more robust and less brittle than the stainless blade. I suspect this is both due to the hollow grind vs. the flat (sabre?) grind as well as the material of each blade. The sabre grind and carbon steel seems to produce a blade that could take a lot of punishment.

Anyways, I like both knives a lot. The Buck is razor sharp and like a fine piece of jewelry. The Bushlore seems well made, robust and durable and feels good in my hand.

Oh boy…is the beginning of a collection???

Sorry for the long post.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 01-19-2014, 12:21 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildfield
Anyways, I like both knives a lot. The Buck is razor sharp and like a fine piece of jewelry. The Bushlore seems well made, robust and durable and feels good in my hand.

Oh boy…is the beginning of a collection???
The two knives are sort of opposites in design philosophy (materials, grind, handle, etc.) so I think they are a great start of a collection. (Some could call it the beginning of an addiction. Of course, I'm sure that would never happen to you...)

It will be interesting to see if you develop an affinity for one or the other over time.

In case you're curious, there are only three steps to 12 step knife addiction programs. Step one is to print out the 12 steps on a piece of paper. Step two is to test the sharpness of your most recent aquisition by slicing up the piece of paper you just printed the 12 steps on. The third step is to buy another knife.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Wenger Ranger Knife Ralph General Gear Discussion 2 07-24-2013 10:40 AM
MSR Alpine Kitchen Knife dsuursoo Backcountry Kitchen 1 09-29-2011 02:15 AM
KaBar Adventure Piggyback Knife Ralph Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills 0 10-31-2010 06:43 AM
HOW do you USE your knife when backpacking? AlanBaljeu General Gear Discussion 45 01-06-2010 08:02 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:48 PM.

Backpacking Forums


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2017 Practical Backpacking™
Practical Backpacking is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacker is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Podcast is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Magazine is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™