Practical Backpacking™ Forums

Welcome to Practical Backpacking™ Forums (PBF).

You are currently viewing PBF as a guest which has limited access. By becoming a PBF member, you will have full access to view and participate in tens of thousands of informative discussions, to view links and attachments (photos), and will gain access to other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free! Click to Become a PBF Member! Be sure to also explore the Practical Backpacking Podcast.


Go Back   Practical Backpacking™ Forums > Practical Backpacking™ General Outdoors (Backpacking Related) > Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills
HOME FAQ PBF GUIDELINES BLOG PODCAST GALLERY STORE CALENDAR Mark Forums Read

Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills The Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to ancient and/or primitive style bushcraft/wilderness skills (e.g. firecraft, foraging, natural material construction, modern/primitive tools, long-term wilderness survival,...).


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 09-03-2013, 03:41 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Senior Member
Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
one upside to using something softer, such as a 1075 steel - you're a little less likely to chip the blade than you are with harder 1095-type steels. the edge will roll, and can in fact often be re-dressed easier.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 09-04-2013, 07:20 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Pinnah Pinnah is offline
Practical Backpacking™ New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 11
Lowest cost DIY: modify an Old Hickory and cut down the blade to suit.

Low cost DIY: find an old fixed blade hunting knife and file tip to drop point. Western, Camillus, Buck can be found used. Here's an old Schrade modified.


H 15 drop point 2 by Pinnah

Low cost new: Mora classic (birch handle), Buck Bucklite Max fixed blade, Condor.

Medium price new: Esee, Queen drop point hunter, Svord drop point hunter,

I would steer clear of current Schrade
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 09-04-2013, 11:26 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
...to my mind 1/8" steel, 1075 at that, just isn't enough for a blade that may have to be pressed into service for wood processing.

...I have ordered the Rodan, a 5 mm, 5-1/4" drop point (in my view a very practical blade for bushcraft chores other than wood processing; my current "favorite" is the KaBar Mark 1 Navy)
,

Ben
If I'm in cold 3rd season or full-on 4th season packing, the bushlore might go as a back up or adjunct, but I'd definitely have my Kabar heavy bowie with me for wood processing. I take the Bushlore for the other 3 seasons, when our North Cal weather makes full-on fire making an unlikely need for survival - although I wouldn't hesitate to baton through smaller, thinner stuff with the Bushlore.

Definitely looking forward to what you think of your Rodan. I've seen one and felt it, and it's a pretty substantial knife. The Bushlore is puny by comparison. Similar in design and heft to a "small" Becker I've seen, but way more attractively priced.
Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Partners
  #24  
Old 09-05-2013, 06:35 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Benwaller Benwaller is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
Sleeping Gear: Kelty LightYear Down 20 / ENO Doublenest Hammock
Shelter: Granite Gear White Lightnin' tarp
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Posts: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by GGervin
If I'm in cold 3rd season or full-on 4th season packing, the bushlore might go as a back up or adjunct, but I'd definitely have my Kabar heavy bowie with me for wood processing. I take the Bushlore for the other 3 seasons, when our North Cal weather makes full-on fire making an unlikely need for survival - although I wouldn't hesitate to baton through smaller, thinner stuff with the Bushlore.

Definitely looking forward to what you think of your Rodan. I've seen one and felt it, and it's a pretty substantial knife. The Bushlore is puny by comparison. Similar in design and heft to a "small" Becker I've seen, but way more attractively priced.

The Rodan will be here Saturday and I'll update this thread with my findings.

Interesting that you pack a Ka-Bar should wood processing be a possible necessity. Though I don't carry a Large Bowie I do make use of both the Marine 7" and the Cutlass Machete (not at the same time of course) when heavy work is required and always have them with when heavyweight camping. Fact is I am a huge fan of most things Ka-Bar as I have found their blades to be absolutely reliable, their performance entirely predictable, in short I trust the adequacy of their products when pressed into hard service.

As for Nor Cal winter, well, it's pretty minor compared to many other parts of the Nation. Count me as one of those grateful wine country dwellers, long ago liberated from the misery of Illinois Decembers.

Yeah, a howling wind drifting BB snow across a flat plain at 20 below ain't my idea of a good time. Been there, done that.

,

Ben
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 09-05-2013, 01:34 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
Interesting that you pack a Ka-Bar should wood processing be a possible necessity. Though I don't carry a Large Bowie I do make use of both the Marine 7" and the Cutlass Machete (not at the same time of course) when heavy work is required and always have them with when heavyweight camping. Fact is I am a huge fan of most things Ka-Bar as I have found their blades to be absolutely reliable, their performance entirely predictable, in short I trust the adequacy of their products when pressed into hard service.

,

Ben
The main reasons I picked that Kabar were that it seemed to be a good design (long flat grind 1085 steel blade, 1/4" tang, decent handle with guard designed for wood work not combat), has a good reputation for batoning, and it was quite inexpensive at the time (think I got mine a couple of years ago for about $50.00). Most stout batoning knives are considerably more. So like my Condor, price was a factor. I don't think the Heavy Bowie is pretty. But everything about it is functional (as long as you want a knife that big to begin with).

Last edited by GGervin : 09-07-2013 at 03:47 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 09-05-2013, 03:03 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Benwaller Benwaller is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Associate Member
Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
Sleeping Gear: Kelty LightYear Down 20 / ENO Doublenest Hammock
Shelter: Granite Gear White Lightnin' tarp
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sonoma County, CA
Posts: 285
The Ka-bars sell precisely because they are stout, reliable and affordable; if you lose one you know where you can get another and you know that it will be just as good as the last one. That can't be said of many products in the market today.

On the aesthetics of it all, well, yeah that Bowie ain't pretty but I bet you can give most wood a decent whuppin' with it and that is the reason you got it, right?

Sometimes pretty just doesn't matter. Or maybe sometimes pretty means something entirely different than physical beauty. I find a woman who can drop an elk at 400 yards quite beautiful which has nothing whatsoever to do with the color of her eyes. They are a very soft brown by the way.

But really, I mean how many times have you been out there and either been with or encountered folks who think their $300 knife is their girlfriend? I've seen lots of 'em. Proud as peacocks and loathe to put the blade to the wood, always checking their kit to reassure themselves that their prize is still in proximity. I don't know why they risk the stress of potential loss, probably for the same reasons that they seek trophies through marriage. Fact is you just can't rub 'em hard enough to keep 'em shiny. Unless that's all you do.

I am reminded here of the immortal words of Crocodile Dundee, "That ain't a knife - this is a knife...", as he cleans his fingernails and then picks his teeth with it, crocodile meat stuck in all the tiny cracks of the scales. I think I get what he means.

That a knife is always just a knife.

Useful to keep in mind, that.

Ka-bar. It's just a knife.

That it is, and I've got several.

,

Ben

Update on the Rodan.

Hmmmm. Well, the sheath is outstanding. Otherwise it's pretty much a pry bar, though I can see some use as a notcher. But there are better options out there even for this purpose. The handle is outsized (huge actually), the blade too heavy for its length (but that's to be expected, given the steel thickness), the plane of the secondary not a plane at all but a convex radius (makes me suspect that this "sharpening" was "accomplished" by somebody sitting astride an ammo box working a Harbor Freight vertical belt sander running tired grit). Shiny edge though. Good job on the symmetry of the face angles, too; what you get on one side is reflected well on its opposite. And the black blade coating is hard and slippery. But I always remove all applied coatings from all my blades anyway so the quality of the coating is irrelevant regardless.

It's not actually horrible, but its not ready for prime time either in my view, kinda' a caricature really, certainly not a "bushcraft" candidate unless you need to make camp furniture out of bamboo.

But I do like projects and this thing is gonna' be one. So, my plan for this chunk of steel is to cut the plastic "indestructible" (and I'm thinkin' that it really is) handle off and re-profile the whole thing, thin it down all over. I have the technology and no other more interesting projects at present; might be able to make a knife out it. If I can't, well, I do have an outstanding sheath into which my Mark 1 fits really well.

To be fair, for the price it's a pretty good effort and I don't here infer that the Condor product line is junk because there are likely examples of good blades to be found within it. But in my view the Rodan just ain't even close, mainly because the design absolutely sucks. As for temper, well, I suppose I could run out to the shop and see if it will cut mild steel bolts if I hit the back hard enough with a ball peen hammer, but that would not be a fair test.

Naw, I'll just fix it. We learn by doing.

,

Ben

Last edited by Benwaller : 09-07-2013 at 07:23 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
Reply With Quote
Please Consider PBF Partners
  #27  
Old 09-14-2013, 02:28 AM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
(makes me suspect that this "sharpening" was "accomplished" by somebody sitting astride an ammo box working a Harbor Freight vertical belt sander running tired grit)
Hey, wait a minute... What's wrong with that! My ammo box is very comfy, and... never mind. Forget I asked...

Your take on the Rodan is about the same as mine when I picked it up and felt it. A little heavy and a little large-hilted for the length. Couldn't figure out when I'd carry it. But I really wanted to like it. Still reminds me of an inexpensive BK-2.

I'd love to see whatever mods you accomplish on it. I do think there's a sturdy, useable knife buried in there somewhere.

As I said above, I'm pretty sure all the Condors - bushcraft style and otherwise - are convex grinds when the photos make them look like scandis. (My bushlore is, the bushcrafts I've purchased, thought twice about and returned were, and my golok is, along with all the other big and little Condors I've personally seen.) Some say that's good since convex grinds are strong, others say it sacrifices ease of cutting. Any Condor can be reground to scandi. I guess whether that's advisable depends on the specific blade and your own preference. For now, my Bushlore is still convex. Bet that Rodan is beefy enough to regrind without sacrificing any strength.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 09-15-2013, 10:14 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
FirstRWD FirstRWD is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
Backpack: Detours 40L or Bike Panniers
Sleeping Gear: Homemade Synthetic Quilt
Shelter: North Face Mica FL 2
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: WI
Posts: 85
Ben, thanks for the feedback on the Rodan. What you said about it pretty much fell in line with what I was thinking about it. I think the cutting edge needs to be ground all the way to the handle, and the handle does seem bulky. I feel like if they fixed those two things, which shouldn't really add to the cost of the knife, then it would be a serious consideration for myself and probably others.

Luckily the Bushlore seems to have a reasonable handle and they did change the blade so that the cutting edge goes to the handle of the knife. It's not as large of a knife as the Rodan, though, so it's not of interest for someone looking for something that size. Your custom Rodan sounds like it should be a cool knife. Please do post about it after you're done working on it.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 09-16-2013, 07:29 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
GGervin GGervin is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Forums Moderator
Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: California
Posts: 436
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
the bushlore isn't all that far off from the knife that horace kephart designed a hundred and some years ago. about the same steel grade, same size roughly, etc. it's not a bad design at all. it's just extremely traditional. it's a knife that will get a lot of jobs done.
I don't quote the same post twice too often, seems a little odd. The last time I quoted this, I mentioned the Condor Bushcraft. Now, I've dicovered yet another Condor bush knife. ...Called the " Kephart." Even closer still to the knife Kephart advocated.

I haven't had this one in hand. Expect I'd personally like it a little better than the Bushcraft, maybe noticeably less than my Bushlore. But it's interesting how seriously Condor has taken cheap, utilitarian bush knives in the North American tradition. Same steel and grind, but several alternatives for blade and handle design.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 09-21-2013, 05:49 PM
© 2006-2016 Practical Backpacking™ / All Rights Reserved
Ralph Ralph is offline
Practical Backpacking­™ Valued Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 503
I have a lot of knives, probably more than I need but many are special purpose.

The Mora is a fine "starter" knife but Moras are designed for slicing and carving not for pounding on.

For very durable, reasonably priced knives that can be pounded on Condor is hard to beat. Full tang, good handle design and materials and good leather sheaths make them good bushcraft tools. I have two at the moment, a Nessmuk and a Hudson Bay and am pleased with both. The Bushlore or the Kephart will be my next purchase and either I would recommend as a "starter".
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Wenger Ranger Knife Ralph General Gear Discussion 2 07-24-2013 10:40 AM
MSR Alpine Kitchen Knife dsuursoo Backcountry Kitchen 1 09-29-2011 02:15 AM
KaBar Adventure Piggyback Knife Ralph Bushcraft & Primitive Wilderness Skills 0 10-31-2010 06:43 AM
HOW do you USE your knife when backpacking? AlanBaljeu General Gear Discussion 45 01-06-2010 08:02 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:40 AM.

Backpacking Forums


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2017 Practical Backpacking™
Practical Backpacking is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacker is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Podcast is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™
Practical Backpacking Magazine is a trademark of Absolutely Prepared™