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Sleeping Gear The Sleeping Gear forum is for the discussion of sleeping gear (bags, mats, quilts...).


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  #1  
Old 06-25-2013, 08:10 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Warm Summer Nights Sleeping Bag and Quilt Roundup

Which model of sleeping bag or quilt/blanket do you use for warm nights? Since "warm" is a somewhat subjective term, let's consider a warm night to be 50° Fahrenheit (10° Celsius) or warmer (for the sake of this thread).

Feel free to list more than one option and indicate the temperature range (50° F. or above) for which each is used.

Thank you for your participation.

Reality
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  #2  
Old 06-30-2013, 12:15 AM
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GGervin GGervin is offline
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Backpack: Gregory Shasta, Deuter ACT Lite 65+10
Sleeping Gear: REI ThermoPod +0 mummy, MH 3D +40 mummy
Shelter: SD Superflash, GoLite Hut 1
 
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Location: California
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For years, the only bag I had (which by default was my warm weather bag) was an original (1990 vintage) regular size Polarguard NF Cat's Meow 20 degree bag that weighed in at about 4lbs. I used it on warm night by leaving it unzipped or lying on top. (If you can have only one bag, I think 20 degrees is a pretty flexible rating, and can work fine in lots of weather.

Then about 10 years back, I got a got a 40 degree regular size Mountain Hardware Polarguard 3D bag that weighed in at 2lbs 4oz. Sometimes I still had to lie on top if it was warm enough. It's main advantage wasn't really the 40 degree rating (the 20 really did function fine in warmer weather) so much as the weight savings over the old 4 pounder. So to me, a warm weather bag is an excuse to shed pack weight, not to sleep cooler.

Over time, the side effects of a terrible freak accident (age-related weight gain) left me unable to sleep comfortably in the now over-tight bag. So end of last year I got a large size Marmot Cloudbreak, (claimed 32 degrees, 2lbs 4oz). I haven't gotten to try it out yet, that should come in a couple of weeks. I suspect it will be an exact replacement for the MH bag temp-wise, So I'm sure this will become my go-to warm weather bag. I expect a little unzipping in 50 degree weather, up to lying on top when it's warmer still.

Ya know, as I think about it, I usually have a Design Salt Coolmax Cocoon with me, and in warm weather when I'm on top of the sleeping bag itself, I'm still sleeping in the Cocoon. So depending on how you look at it, maybe the Cocoon is my warm weather bag...
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  #3  
Old 06-30-2013, 06:32 AM
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Benwaller Benwaller is offline
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Backpack: Camelbak RimRunner, Osprey Volt 60, Kelty Redwing 50
Sleeping Gear: Kelty LightYear Down 20 / ENO Doublenest Hammock
Shelter: Granite Gear White Lightnin' tarp
 
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Location: Sonoma County, CA
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Very rarely for those really warm conditions do I resort to my Big Agnes Yampa, a bag advertised to be useful to 40 degrees which it is not, believe me; 50 degrees is just about the limit, so that bag sees very little use as temps drop into the 40's in most places around here. Sometimes I'll stuff it in my Redwing 44 day-hiker, but rarely. It's about 1-3/4 pounds and crushes down to softball size, kinda'.

Normally I pack a Kelty 20 degree Light Year Down 20, a decent bag that I use as a quilt on those warmish nights. Fact is, since I've gone to hammocks pretty much exclusively these days I've also been very thoroughly schooled by experience to never leave home with a too-light bag.

Even when the weatherman says it's gonna' be hot.



Ben
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  #4  
Old 06-30-2013, 08:28 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Backpack: Mountainsmith Maverick 65
Sleeping Gear: ALPS +20 mummy
Shelter: Kelty Noah 9x9
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,482
i'm in agreement that a 20 degree bag is probably the ideal all-rounder.

for really warm weather i have one of those fleece blankets/liners, that's for when it's really hot out. when it's not that hot out, i've also got a wool blanket i've had for ages that really does cover a wide range of temperatures.

but if there's high odds of inclement weather i go with my 20F bag, as it's synthetic and won't make a wet trip miserable. i can use it as a quilt if nothing else...
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  #5  
Old 07-01-2013, 05:48 AM
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GWyble GWyble is offline
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Backpack: Mariposa Plus / REI Flash 65
Sleeping Gear: Eureka Silver City / Lafuma WnL 600
Shelter: Tarptent Squall 2 / Appy Trails Mark V
 
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Location: St Charles, MO
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For 50 degrees and above I have cheapo sythetic bag that compresses really small and weighs 21 ounces. It was in a large pile at an army surplus store and had no brand name.

For even warmer weather I can get by with a Thermolite Reactor which I really like.
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  #6  
Old 07-01-2013, 11:37 AM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GGervin
If you can have only one bag, I think 20 degrees is a pretty flexible rating, and can work fine in lots of weather.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Benwaller
Normally I pack a Kelty 20 degree Light Year Down 20, a decent bag that I use as a quilt on those warmish nights. Fact is, since I've gone to hammocks pretty much exclusively these days I've also been very thoroughly schooled by experience to never leave home with a too-light bag.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
i'm in agreement that a 20 degree bag is probably the ideal all-rounder.

When I'm hiking the mountains (i.e. Cascades) in the summer, nighttime temperatures can drop into the upper 20s or lower 30s (F) - a significant fall from the daytime 80 or even 90s (F) experienced during the day.

I've often carried either a 30° (F) Western Mountaineering option or a "20°" (F) quilt (which was more like a 30° quilt).

However, when I know that I'll be in an area and climate where the temperatures are not going below 50° (F), I don't carry the aforementioned. I've used a light liner or a lighter quilt/blanket option.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GWyble
For even warmer weather I can get by with a Thermolite Reactor which I really like.

How close to 50° (F) would use it exclusively?

Reality
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  #7  
Old 07-01-2013, 01:31 PM
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GWyble GWyble is offline
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Backpack: Mariposa Plus / REI Flash 65
Sleeping Gear: Eureka Silver City / Lafuma WnL 600
Shelter: Tarptent Squall 2 / Appy Trails Mark V
 
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Location: St Charles, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality

How close to 50° (F) would use it exclusively?

Reality

I probably wouldn't use the Thermolite Reactor exclusively if it was going to get below 60°(F) at night. In warm weather I won't be carrying a base layer or jacket.

My son just used it on an overnight hike near Taum Sauk Mountain last week. He was in shorts and a t-shirt and only carried this liner for a sleeping bag. He didn't have to get inside it until about 2am.
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  #8  
Old 05-18-2014, 05:44 PM
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Taedawood Taedawood is offline
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For years, my 50 deg and above insulation was a Mountain Laurel Designs Spirit 40 deg synthetic quilt that weight 15.3 oz. However, this past year I switched to an Enlightened Equipment Revelation 30 deg. down quilt that weighs 20.2 oz. I find the down quilt to be more versatile in that it is more compressible, more breathable, and more comfortable over a wider range of temperatures, well worth the extra 5 oz to me.
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  #9  
Old 05-25-2014, 09:49 AM
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tonto tonto is offline
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To Bag Or Not To Bag...that Is The Question

I've been a Scout leader for the past 18 years and have done a lot of experiments with different sleep set ups.

One option I've used when the temps get above 50 degrees is to not carry a sleeping bag at all.

Instead, I use a one pound, long model, REI Minimalist Bivi Sack.

I crawl inside wearing my hiking cloths (what I'd be packing anyways).

If the temps drop into the 40s I'll put on light thermals, wool socks, fleece cap, and a wool shirt (again, what I'd be packing anyways).

Things I like about the Bivi option:

1. Slumber protection at 1 pound.
2. Bug net opening keeps the pests at bay and provides a little extra warmth if needed.
3. The Bivi provides weather and convective heat loss protection without the extra weight of a tent.
4. Cowboy Camping is just a quick throw down without the need to set up a shelter.

When I was on the Appalachian Trail from May to July last year I decided not to bring the bivi and used a more conventional option.

On that hike I did a lot of shelter hopping because it was convenient not to set up a shelter.
Just about every night there was room in the shelters as the thru-hikers where long gone.
For back up when the shelters where full, which wasn't often, I carried an 8 x 10 sil-tarp instead of a tent.
I only needed to set up the tarp 5 times in three months.
The tarp set up with stakes, tie outs, and a 4 mil contractor trash bag ground sheet, was 1 pound 5 oz.

For sleeping:

During the whole hike I carried a one pound 3/4 length self inflating Therma-Rest sleep pad.
I also carried a 3 oz 18" x 18" section of cut down yoga mat that served double duty for insulation under my feet and as a sitting mat.
As back up for cool nights I still packed some light thermals, wool socks, and fleece cap.

From May to June I used a 2 pound $2 thrift store down barrel style sleeping bag, good to about 35 degrees.

In July, I switched to a 1.5 lb cheap Ozark Trail fleece bag, good to about 50 degrees.

The whole set up provided shelter and sleep at 4.5 pounds from May to June and 4 pounds in July.
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