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Fishing & Hunting The Fishing & Hunting forum is for discussion (on-site content) that directly relates to wilderness fishing and hunting with an emphasis on engaging in these activities while on backpacking trips. Lightweight/packable gear, personal experience/technique, and trip reports are of central focus. [Reminder: PBF is for actual content, not links/reference to offsite content.]


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  #1  
Old 06-13-2013, 09:28 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Takedown Rifles

Do you have a takedown rifle? Or, is there one that you particularly like?

By the way, have you seen the new Ruger 10/22 Takedown? Of course, others remain lighter (e.g. Marlin Papoose).

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  #2  
Old 06-14-2013, 07:56 AM
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Grandpa Grandpa is offline
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I've owned an Armalite AR-7 Exlplorer for about 40 years. I used to toss it in my airplane when I'd be flying out West but I don't show up at airports (even General Aviation ones) with firearms anymore.
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  #3  
Old 06-14-2013, 07:00 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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I have a Marlin Papoose .22, but for hitting what I aim at I prefer my Thompson Center .22 carbine (taken down in the following pic):




I finally ordered a .357 magnum barrel for it. I first had to sell some stuff (other barrels and scopes) to rationalize this decision .
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Old 06-14-2013, 07:30 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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i've been eyeing takedowns for years. i know they'll be an eventual purchase.

that said, i REALLY wish there was a takedown similar to the AR-7 but in a beefier caliber, something a bit more brisk and maybe even medium game capable than a .22LR, but that would still fit in that compact a package. maybe i'll draw one up one day and find a gunsmith who can make it.
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Old 06-14-2013, 07:41 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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I agree that the AR-7 packaging can't be beat. I would drool over a caliber legal for deer. Might have to finally break down and buy one. Maybe from Dsuursoo .
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Old 06-14-2013, 08:12 PM
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ContainsImages

Nice rifle, richwads.

There are several large caliber (.457 mag., .50, 30/30,...) takedowns to be had, but they come with a big price tag.

Here's my takedown "US Survival" rifle:



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Old 06-15-2013, 01:34 AM
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Bushwalker Bushwalker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
i've been eyeing takedowns for years. i know they'll be an eventual purchase.

that said, i REALLY wish there was a takedown similar to the AR-7 but in a beefier caliber, something a bit more brisk and maybe even medium game capable than a .22LR, but that would still fit in that compact a package. maybe i'll draw one up one day and find a gunsmith who can make it.



I've seen a .308 (7.62mm) "Scout rifle" on a couple of gun-oriented websites this year, that would fit such a brief in all but one area : their weight (around 9 or 10 pounds all up..) would mean that they would be of more interest for car-based and base camps...

I reckon it could still be ideal for a standby rifle kept in one's SUV while travelling and camping; or as a practical "working" gun in a few farming/agricultural situations..

********************************************

WHILE I haven't used one of those Ruger 10-22 "survival rifles" as yet, from what I've read of them so far makes that seem ideal for a lot of extended backpacking trips, and long distance car trips down here ~ as with their two smaller magazine sizes, they would be quite legal under Aussie weapons laws.

AS for travelling on the airlines down here, any guns you have can be carried as "check through" luggage ~ as with knives, axes, bows and arrows, as well ~ and claimed back from the airport on arrival..
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Old 06-15-2013, 09:57 AM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushwalker


I've seen a .308 (7.62mm) "Scout rifle" on a couple of gun-oriented websites this year, that would fit such a brief in all but one area : their weight (around 9 or 10 pounds all up..) would mean that they would be of more interest for car-based and base camps...

I reckon it could still be ideal for a standby rifle kept in one's SUV while travelling and camping; or as a practical "working" gun in a few farming/agricultural situations..


the scout rifle concept was kind of a glamour kid about ten years. steyr makes a really NICE one but it comes with the pricetag the name demands. i don't know if for a 'survival/takedown' rifle i'd want a cartridge quite so beefy. for an extended expedition type scenario, it would be really nice, if i couldn't take an outright full-size rifle.

it'd definetly be one of the intermediate cartridges that can go into a carbine reasonably well. no lighter than 5.56, i'd say(brisker than .223), probably no more powerful than the old 7.62x39. part of the goal is to keep the action of a size that could pack into the stock reasonably well. both of those rounds do well with short barrels.

or, if the action needs to be kept short, one of the old-school necked-down 9mm variants. some of those were amazing varmit cartridges.

of course, with beefing it up comes the challenge of, how the hell do you pack it into the stock, which is a form-factor i really appreciate. i don't want to give up the magazine, as that's a great feature. the barrel has to be a certain minimum length legally...

it's quite the challenge.
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Old 06-15-2013, 01:27 PM
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richwads richwads is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dsuursoo
it'd definetly be one of the intermediate cartridges that can go into a carbine reasonably well. no lighter than 5.56, i'd say(brisker than .223), probably no more powerful than the old 7.62x39. part of the goal is to keep the action of a size that could pack into the stock reasonably well.
or, if the action needs to be kept short, one of the old-school necked-down 9mm variants. some of those were amazing varmit cartridges.

of course, with beefing it up comes the challenge of, how the hell do you pack it into the stock, which is a form-factor i really appreciate.
Eliminating the action itself makes it easier. Just a frame that a hinged barrel hooks up to. Then the design detail that needs to be worked out is only how to get the 16" barrel inside the stock, with the trigger mechanism in the way. OTOH, a TC frame/trigger mechanism is attached with only one bolt to the buttstock. I'm thinking a TC type of design could be tweaked to get frame and barrel both inside the buttstock, easier than a repeater type of action. And strong enough to take any cartridge you want.
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Old 06-15-2013, 11:50 PM
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dsuursoo dsuursoo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richwads
Eliminating the action itself makes it easier. Just a frame that a hinged barrel hooks up to. Then the design detail that needs to be worked out is only how to get the 16" barrel inside the stock, with the trigger mechanism in the way. OTOH, a TC frame/trigger mechanism is attached with only one bolt to the buttstock. I'm thinking a TC type of design could be tweaked to get frame and barrel both inside the buttstock, easier than a repeater type of action. And strong enough to take any cartridge you want.

very good points, yes. a break-block/falling block design is almost ridiculously strong and could take a lot of different cartridges. heck, it could even swap calibers among cartridge families(the .248/.308/.357win family comes to mind).

my biggest gripe about it is the lack of a swift follow up. shot placement all you want, but sometimes that quick second shot is the ticket to dining.

if a beefed up takedown went above (lighter)pistol calibers, the action would become significantly too large to be semi-auto. then some form of bolt-action is probably the best bet for a repeating design.

i might be over-thinking this... this has been done before. the M96. modify it for a longer, removable barrel and enlarge the stock to acommodate it. here i've been thinking along traditional 'rifle' lines when it's not 100% necessary. make the stock water-tight and bam. takedown, survival/emergency rifle, more oomph than a .22LR. the old 7.63 mauser round was fantastic for light game, in the neighborhood of .30 carbine.

well huh. now to go out and find a gunsmith willing to make a mauster broomhandle-type gun. and figure out a way to make it unusable without the stock in place. oo, that's the hard part.


all theoretical talk aside, i do wish there were more LARGE takedown guns. the laws on taking apart a break-action are variable to sketchy. scout rifles don't take-down and they're expensive. regular rifles are too bulky, carbines don't usually(disregarding the various pistol-magnum carbines) have the power...

there was a savage model out there, as i recall, where the barrel was held to the action by a fairly easy to remove nut. what was that, the 110? the 140?

Last edited by dsuursoo : 06-15-2013 at 11:55 PM.
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