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Gear Workshop The Gear Workshop forum is for the discussion of homemade backpacking gear, gear modifications, and repairs.


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  #1  
Old 03-14-2013, 09:46 AM
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atraildreamer atraildreamer is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Providence, RI
Posts: 159
Lightbulb McSpork (Spoon)

In the summer, I often stop at McDonald's and get a McFlurry. They come with a plastic spoon that is easily recycled into a lightweight backpacking spoon that I call the McSpork!

How to make a McSpork:

1. Buy a McFlurry and consume,

2. Keep the spoon, bring it home and wash it,

3. Cut off the little hook at the top of the handle. (I think that the hook is used to attach to the machine that mixes the McFlurry. It is easily removed with a sharp knife.),

4. Make a small hole on the back of the spoon handle, near the bottom (Highlighted in black) to allow any liquids to drain out that may get in the handle when you are eating,

5. Cut little teeth in the end of the spoon. (I used a small pair of scissors.),

( If you are using it for freezer bag cooking, omit cutting the teeth, they will puncture the freezer bag!)

6. Your McSpork is ready to use!
Attached Images
File Type: jpeg Mcflurry.jpeg (3.4 KB, 14 views)
File Type: jpeg McFlurry spoon w tab.jpeg (6.5 KB, 41 views)
File Type: jpg McFlurry spoon.jpg (59.8 KB, 24 views)
File Type: jpg McHole.jpg (53.7 KB, 30 views)
File Type: jpg McSpork.jpg (58.6 KB, 29 views)
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  #2  
Old 03-14-2013, 06:52 PM
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Reality Reality is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,954
Thanks for sharing your idea and photos, atraildreamer.

By the way, you could probably fashion a way to store and cap spices or something in the spoon handle.

Reality
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  #3  
Old 04-17-2013, 03:05 PM
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Robislookin Robislookin is offline
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Backpack: 55L molle pack
Shelter: Kelty Noah 16
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Panama City Beach, FL
Posts: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reality
Thanks for sharing your idea and photos, atraildreamer.

By the way, you could probably fashion a way to store and cap spices or something in the spoon handle.

Reality


Excellent idea I am always trying to multi task almost everything. It’s a cook thing.

Try using one of the new synthetic corks (they don’t swell as much when wet) for wine bottles, but use a very sharp knife to trim it down. And trim it a little at a time, don’t get in a hurry and your patience will be rewarded. You can’t add the cork back after you’ve cut it off.

Be careful using the knife, for some reason knifes have a tendency to cut you…lol. Just a little lite heartedness.
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Old 04-28-2014, 01:48 PM
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atraildreamer atraildreamer is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Providence, RI
Posts: 159
Another cheap camp kitchen idea...

I wanted to cut up a tomato without having to use a full-size cutting board and realized that a plastic cover from an empty oatmeal box that was about to be thrown out was the ideal size for my needs.

The cover is about 6 inches across and has a plastic lip which keeps the food from spilling over the edge.

You can also use the cover from a plastic coffee canister. Look around the kitchen and see what is available.

The price is right, the cover is the ideal size and weight for a backpacker's kitchen and when it wears out, you can just toss it in the trash and get another one!
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  #5  
Old 05-04-2014, 10:44 PM
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FirstRWD FirstRWD is offline
Practical Backpacking™ Regular Member
Backpack: Detours 40L or Bike Panniers
Sleeping Gear: Homemade Synthetic Quilt
Shelter: North Face Mica FL 2
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: WI
Posts: 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by atraildreamer
when it wears out, you can just toss it in the recycling and get another one!
It just might help preserve these forests we like to walk around in.
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